Serene Life

by garik

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30

I find that when it comes to stuff like reviews (including, but not limited to photography equipment), you probably don't want to put all your eggs in one basket for anything important. If you look at two or three (or more) reviews, however, you should start to see some common themes emerging -- ie, the lens is soft wide-open, or it focuses slowly, or ...


18

I think these two sites should not be completely lumped together. Let's let each man talk for himself. From Ken Rockwell's "About" page: Apparently the world finds my opinions very useful, but remember, they are the opinions of one man. I have a big sense of humor, and do this site to entertain you (and myself), as well as to inform and to educate. I ...


16

It is at least partly true of some of the busiest photographers. It has nothing to do with the photographs not being edited, and simply means the photographer isn't the one doing the editing. Just for example, during the Olympics, the guys doing shooting just shoot. They have at least a couple of cameras, and an assistant who's responsible (among other ...


15

Patience and persistence. "Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst." - attributed to Henri Cartier-Bresson I'm amazed how much you learn simply by taking more pictures. I started a photo a day project last October, and I can tell a huge difference in the quality of my photos now compared to when I started. Also, take an evening and spend a ...


11

Gregory Crewdson (more) For the surreal mood and feeling he can craft in a photograph with his controlled lighting mixed with 'in situ' lighting. That and the storytelling nature of the photographs that cause you to linger on the image, wondering what the subjects are doing... or have done.


11

Just do an image search with google on that url http://www.google.com/imghp and it will offer to search by image. Which results in: Best guess for this image: Saul Leiter and, following some of the results, the title "Lanesville, 1958".


11

Tokihiro Sato, I believe. A site with his work is here: http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/satoexh.html The specific photograph you're referring to is http://photoarts.com/gallery/sato/87.html


10

K-rock has some interesting opinions, but I often think of him as the Matt Drudge of the Photography world. I suspect most of his opinions are to generate views, and to that end, he has succeeded. Here is how I judge the opinions of online photographers; how do their own personal galleries look?


9

Michael Kenna inspires me the most. You can see his work compilation here. There's a short documentary on his techniques. His work exudes sophistication through simplicity. You sense the solitude, the etherealness, and tranquility, as if you were in the scenes yourself. "Six Sticks" pictured above, is one of my favorites of his. I emailed him a while ...


9

Websites like kenrockwell.com and bythom.com are entertaining and idiosyncratic. They are an expression of their owner's personality and deserve reading for that reason. But when you are looking for good guidance when selecting a lens you should rather go to one of the several sites that approach the matter in a serious disciplined way. There are a ...


8

One among many that's been hugely inspiring to me: Twin Cities Brightest He's got some really interesting light-painting work, much of which has interesting conceptual components to it, e.g. his "alien abductions" series, including this one: He also frequently shows how he does what he's doing, which is another way he's inspirational to me, e.g.: An ...


8

Interesting that you put Ken Rockwell and Thom Hogan in the same question; my take is that these are very different types of people. As others have said, Ken is kind of a nut. On the other hand, I find Thom Hogan's reviews particularly compelling because they relate real experiences and read very sane - for example, Thom has a good attitude (IMO) about when ...


8

The best thing you can do is shoot a photograph of it, crop it, then go to google image search and upload it through clicking the small camera icon. Google will try to find similar pictures hopefully helping you to find the image. I doubt we can help you much beyond that with such a vague description.


7

Henri Cartier-Bresson. Another 'old master' who is just as relevant as today as 70 years ago. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Cartier-Bresson


6

Becoming a professional wedding photographer means running a small business, and that requires sales and marketing. Being successful means selling your services to a lot of potential clients. It has very little to do with making great photographs. If you are not a people person, if you can't sell, your business will fail even if you have the talents of the ...


6

In my opinion you are asking the wrong question. First of all, you shouldn't ask questions of a professional that you would like to hire before taking a look at their portfolio. That is the complete opposite of what I would do. This is a rule, steadfast, true: Let the work speak for itself┬╣ Does the photographer have an excellent portfolio full of the type ...


5

I find Vivian Maier's street photography especially inspirational. Over a period of some 40 years she took more than 100,000 photos, mostly street scenes in Chicago See this link and this link. She is remarkable for the single minded way in which she devoted her adult life to photography, spending her off duty hours walking the streets and taking ...


5

Henri Cartier-Bresson I like street photography a lot and therefore Henri Cartier-Bresson is my hero: http://www.photoquotes.com/showphotographs.aspx?id=98&name=Cartier-Bresson,Henri


5

Garrit Pieper I linked to http://garrit.deviantart.com and not to his own site (http://www.garrit.de) as it seems to be in redesign. Some work of him: and many more on deviantart.com


5

No, that is incorrect. However, some photographers do avoid digital post-processing, and some still shoot film. To say that all "high class" photographers would avoid editing software is far to general of a statement though. Edit: A "high-class photographer", by your definition, one who can produce good results for every single shot would not use editing ...


5

Thom Hogan is a very reputable guy and his site has a lot of insightful info especially when it comes to lenses. I read a lot of great lens reviews from Dpreview and such, but Thom goes a step further than all of them, he actually tells you why this particular lens behaves this way in this particular situation, or what makes it underrated or overrated lens. ...


5

The Photographers's Ephemeris With this, you can pick a location on a map, and the app will show you the times of sunrise/sunset (and moon), including the times and a graphical indication of where the sun/moon will rise/set on the map, so you can plan shots. This has been a windows app that is now available on Androis and soon on iOS. This may be the one ...


4

I don't think there's a specific answer to this question because most other artistic disciplines can help your photography. Studying paintings or learning to paint yourself can allow you to see light and shadow in everyday scenes around you as well as teach you about classic composition techniques. So, I think painting is a great thing for a photographer ...


4

Ansel Adams, hands down ... I love his treatment of nature in black & white. I've used his work as inspiration for a number of my projects.


4

I'll bet you 10 to 1 that I may the only one to post a link to an amateur, but I find the wife of a friend of mine to be one of the most inspiring to me. Her photostream on Flickr is a big reason for it, but the biggest reason is that she only started shooting a couple of years ago, never held an SLR in her hands before, and this is an example of what she ...


4

This is a pretty subjective question... However, I'm game. :) Skill, obviously, helps a great deal especially when you have to react to the moment and be able to adjust quickly for that. However, that alone isn't going to create a great photo. An old adage was f/8 and be there, indicating that you should forget about the camera and get the image. Easier ...


4

When I was at University I attended a talk from someone working for the North Yorkshire police's imaging unit. It sounded like a very interesting job, which ranged from crime scene photography, surveillance and promo work. This department was one of the largest and best in the country, and so regularly performed work for the other police departments, who ...



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