Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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0

Easy to fix! In PS, go to WINDOW, then ARRANGE, then "FLOAT IN WINDOW" should take care of it! I also set my workspace to photography (WINDOW, WORKSPACE, PHOTOGRAPHY).... Gives you the best layout for editing photographs... Hope this helps!


2

I appreciate your question how to make dreamlike pictures and also your analysis of the histogram. My point here is that the histogram only helps you in part for making a dreamlike picture. This is my analysis of the picture and some of the others on the linked page: First and foremost, these pictures are dreamlike, because these are our dreams. It's ...


0

Using Photoshop and a levels layer. Hold down the Alt key (Windows) and slide the highlight arrow towards the center. That will show the brightest pixels first. Then pull the Shadows arrow towards the center. That will show the darkest pixels


3

I think there's a psychological aspect to this as well. It's easy to only look at the technical things of a photograph, but no matter how fancy your lighting equipment or camera is or how many years of experience and gathered post processing knowledge you have: in the end, content matters, that is: what you see in the image. I think the post processing ...


7

The histogram for this image looks like this: Key points: Nothing over in the far left — the blackpoint is lifted, or to put it another way, the deepest, darkest color is not black, but gray (and there's not much of that). The bulk of the tones, including a big spike, are way over in the brightest 90%. And, there's also a spike at 100% — that is, fully ...


1

Open the Levels dialog box and watch the image as you move the slider. That's the quickest way to visually "watch it"? Levels is sometimes referred to as threshold range (Gimp), luminosity sliders (in Lab color space), and similar terminology. Find the Levels equivalent commands and adjustments in your software. Since the question mentions Photoshop and ...


1

You can click on one step of the history stack on the right hand side to view the image "as it is at that step". Click back to the top to view the latest version. Warning: while you are viewing one step of the history stack, any attempt to edit the picture will discard the top of your stack. You can go to the step you want in history, make a snapshot, come ...


1

There is no such thing as a natural photo. Whether intentional or not, every photo is an interpretation of reality. Cameras don't see the same way our eyes/brains do. I don't think I've ever seen a photograph that was "plausible as a real life eye view." I'm always aware I am viewing a photograph rather than the actual scene. What is included and what is ...


1

I think the natural answer is that if the goal is "natural", then avoid the Vivid and Landscape colors.


4

Each control has two different uses; to compensate for shortcomings in the original exposure, or to add an effect to the image. In a certain range the control has the first use, beyond that it has the second use. The problem is that there is no specific values where a control goes from compensating to effect, and in each case there isn't even a specific ...


2

On the other hand I doubt advanced functions like noise reduction, local contrast or edges could be obtained through traditional film photography — and it seems quite easy to fell on the "too much" side of photo editing. There is no doubt that digital files allow much more processing flexibility than traditional silver halide film. But in this ...


2

One big one you can do digitally that was very hard to do with film is color correction at more than one place along the dark/light range. Unless you were doing very complicated, time consuming, and difficult masking, you could only color correct a photographically processed (as apposed to digitally processed) image at one color point. Color enlargers had ...


3

Actually local contrast / edge enhancement can and was done with film. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsharp_masking#Photographic_unsharp_masking Other processes that could be done with film include: cropping, contrast enhancement, rotation, colour manipulation, selective brightening/darkening, gradient filters, image compositing, dust/spec removal / ...


2

To capture images like this you will need The night of a new moon (the moon will wash out the image otherwise). You may be able to get away with a sliver of a moon as well. Log exposure, I usually opt for below the 30 second range so that you wont see star trails. Unless you are trying to shoot star trails they are fun as well. A tripod or something to ...


6

According to author's annotation to the image at 500px, it was taken in desert of Medina, Kuwait. It was submitted for inclusion with Ubuntu by someone else, and luckily the Albanian photographer Shady S. was happy to give his permission. More generally, you'll need a location with no light pollution from surroundings. Technique-wise, have a look at already ...


0

When I edit JPEGs, I don't want to use Lightroom's Export, because it always generates a new JPEG, and the additional compression may lead to a quality loss. Preventing quality loss due to re-compression is exactly the reason why you want to create new .jpeg files. LR always creates the exported images from the raw files and applies all changes. LR ...


0

This looks like Scratch, by Assimilate Inc. This is (very pricey) color-grading software used for video, and not normally used for still photography (although it can work with and produce stills). In fact I think this is just the free Scratch Play, which is a video player with the ability to generate color correction tables to use in the full software. I ...



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