Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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2

Well, let's say camera A is the Velvia, camera B is your Nikon. Camera A converts physical colors to virtual colors ("pixels") using funcA. Camera B converts physical colors to virtual colors (pixels) using funcB. Establish an ICC profile (ICCA) that converts the pixel color to viewing environment color. Establish an ICC profile (ICCB) that converts the ...


1

Symbian? Have you tried Photo Effect? Probably your best bet is to find a way to install Android on that smartphone :P For Android I highly recommend Pixlr Express - which is free, simple to use, and does everything you need.


3

The act of adding pixels to make the image larger (without adding extra information (this is an important point)) is a basic function of any image processor. There are any number of applications that can do this, however NO image processors can add information to your image, at least not automatically. They can use the information that is already there to ...


2

You can print a 461 by 491 image at whatever size you want, but it isn't going to have any more detail than it has right now. You can't invent detail, you can create new pixels that will make a smooth shading to make it seem less pixely, but it will then just seem more blurry. Unfortunately, at that low of resolution, you really are not going to be able to ...


4

Short answer: Oh, boy... Long answer: The way exists, of course. However, the quality most probably will be very low because the difference in dimensions are too big. I assume that "print it in a regular image size" from your question talks about an image somewhere around 6 MPixels, which is rather conservative. Perhaps other would say 8 Mpixels. Anyway ...


1

A quick Google search for "ios raw files" brings up many results: PhotoRAW, Pirawnha, Photogene, Lightroom Mobile. I haven't tested these, so this answer is incomplete, but perhaps someone can go through these, test them out and comment on their pros and cons.


3

If you open the image with any editor, you can see in the histogram (below) that it only uses (in a significant proportion) 12 of the 255 available brightness levels. This means that it only has 12 shades to represent the image that it captured. Switching to the logarithmic histogram, you can see that actually there is more, but the most significant ...


1

What seems to have been done is to enhance the contrast while the skin of the woman has been treated with "digital makeup". There are specialized G'MIC tools that you can use to make a person look younger.The problem with doing this by hand is that you need selectively blur the skin to remove the unwanted small scale features while making sure you hide the ...


1

Besides the retouching it appears to only have gotten a treatment with some contrast tool (like levels or curves) and a saturation adjustment. Nothing fancy! user342626 might be right with the dodge and burn tools; they are used to "paint" onto the image, making it darker or brighter. That way the editor can paint with "light" and give form and depth to the ...


1

I agree with the comment. Your camera probably came with software to do this. Look for contrast and more broadly, curves adjustments. The background may have been handled by selecting that color to change it, or by using a dodging tool to lighten it. If you don't have software for that, check out your local retail store that sells software. They'll have a ...


0

I read an article by a snowboarding photographer. The answer was faster than software methods. A very potent and high cycling flash unit, assuming the background is too bright and too distant to be affected. Expose for the background adjusting for the total exposure time. Adjust flash power to brighten and freeze the subject. Keep the shutter open while the ...


2

There is a simple method to automate the process using Photoshop. It could be recorded as an action or scripted. Load all of the images into a stack and take the median of each pixel (there is a built in function to do this, might just be in Photoshop extended though). This should give you an image of just the background. Load up the first image and paste ...


0

Yes - I've done this twice, successfully using two separate software tools. The key was to use software tools that have image registration and alignment capabilities. There are quite a few available. The first tool I used, and probably the most flexible, was done using a Panoramic stitching tool, PTAssembler (http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr.htm). ...


0

The answer is definitely YES but if this iPhone use only then it probably doesn't really matter as the destruction of your image is part of the aesthetic of SNAPSEED. NIK Filters make a sharpening plugin and a Analogue FX plugin for photoshop that you can use with 16bit images - as NIK make SNAPSEED then that's the direction you could go


3

So, the short answer if you're editing and saving from Snapseed is yes. There are a couple of reasons why this will result in reduction of quality: You've discarded data from RAW to PNG/JPG in the first place. This now gives less information for Snapseed to work with and so further edits could result in even less data, especially in the shadows and ...


0

One thing you could try is converting the photo in RawTherapee using either of LMMSE or IGV, its two demosaicing algorithms optimized for noisy images. When I tested them against other RT algorithms and Adobe Camera RAW, they were clearly superior. I didn't see a significant difference between the two.



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