Serene Life

by garik

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1

Panorama maker from Arcsoft - This recognises Canon RAW (.CR2) and also .TIFF. Please note, it only exports to the following formats. WINDOWS - JPEG, TIF, BMP, TGA, MOV, SWF, PTViewer MAC - TIFF, JPEG, JPEG-2000, HTML On the Windows version it will recognise JPG, JPEG, TIFF, TIF, RAW (Adobe DNG (.DNG), Canon Camera RAW File (.CRW;.CR2), Epson RAW Format ...


4

Stitching RAW files is problematic. In order to get a good stitch you ideally want to correct vignetting and distortion first, something that you would do in your RAW converter, then just output TIFFs of a smaller size (no need for full size when combining multiple files usually) and things will be both quicker and more accurate.


1

If you're using Darktable 1.4+ you will have access to the masks combobox, inside modules, that can create the masks. You also have access to the masks manager which is in the left panel. The masks manager displays and modiefies the different masks you've created. Note that the mask feature is still quite new and I wouldn't trust it with important work ...


0

You could use dcraw to convert raw files to "raw" tiff files that only contain the raw data using the command "dcraw -D filename". The stitching then needs to be done by taking into account the Bayer pattern. This means that you must extract from each tiff file the pixels that belong to each of 3 color channels. You can use programs such as ImageJ, you do ...


3

PTGui can stitch RAW and DNG images as input. However, remember RAW files do not contain any editing adjustments (such as CA correction, noise reduction, or vignetting correction), so there's not a lot of advantage to be had by going this route, rather than converting your RAWs to TIFFs, and then stitching the TIFFs. See also: Are there any open source ...


0

It would be possible, but it would also be just about the hardest way to go about doing it. Not only would there be next to no interactivity (no real-time feedback on the image changes) while you create your gradient, you need to mentally manage the translation between the RGB 0-255 scale that the info panel displays and the 0-100% scale that the gradient ...


1

Another option which would work well for your scenario is DBGallery, a solution for which I am part of the product team. It is a multi-user photo organization system which runs across a local area network. Links from InDesign work because it stores links to the original files rather than storing the images in the database. To edit the file in hotoshop, ...


0

I use GIMP and ImageJ. ImageJ is a free program that allows you to more easily do lower level manipulations on the individual grey values of the pixels than "higher level tools" such as GIMP.


1

Darktable is a very powerful photo processing tool. You cannot "paint" as with Gimp/Photoshop, but you can apply many kinds of filters in a non-destructive way to your photos. The description from their website expresses the features best: darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom ...


0

Gimp is very good and you can also try Paint.NET. It has a very "Photoshopy" feel to it and it is open source.


1

Try Gimp - it's an open-source alternative to Photoshop (though not as powerful of course).


1

Paintshop Pro is for making pixel edits to individual photos (à la Photoshop). Aftershot Pro is for organising and making non-destructive edits to RAW files (à la Lightroom).



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