India Point Park

India Point Park
by matt-ball                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

I tried to replicate this 'soft year sharp look for a long time in Lightroom and couldn't quite figure it out. I thought lowering the clarity would help, but that just made the image hazey. After a lot of playing around I came up with the following method.. Creating matting effect using tone the RGB tone curves. (For how to do this, just search how to ...


5

Every image format (JPEG, PNG, TIFF, etc.) that I know of can only represent rectangular images. This means that unless you define your own image format, this simply cannot be done. The only thing you can do is to work with transparency. Even though the image itself will still be rectangular, if only a circular portion of it is opaque, it will look like a ...


0

Raw files are basically digital negative of an image. At the same time jpeg is optimized output created by camera. jpeg cannot contain so much data that a raw file can, so its impossible to convert a jpeg image to raw.


6

Short Answer : you may be lucky ! As you supposed, it seems that you have indeed experienced some corruption(s) during the transfer. Technically speaking, a JPG is made of tiny blocks of pixels called "MCU block" (Minimum Coded Unit). In the case of your image, the MCU has the size of 16*8 pixels (regular sizes are 8*8, 8*16 and 16*8). As one can see in ...


3

There exist methods to do this, but as Alex. S also points out in his answer, there are no standard tools that I'm aware of that will do it for you. In principle, it's a straightforward problem. While there are a vast number of mathematically possible raw files that are consistent with the given JPEG file, the vast majority of those are not likely to be the ...


4

You cannot (should not) produce a raw from a jpeg. Theoretically it would be possible as compressed NEF is based on a TIFF container and a "wide" JPEG/JFIF variant IIRC. And all is not lost as, having run these kinds of competitions, I can say that you may still be able to enter depending on what type of competition it is and why they want raw files... ...


28

In addition to the points Alex S made, you need to consider why they want RAW. There are several possible reasons: Bit depth as Alex S said. JPG suffers from compression artefacts which RAW doesn't. Blown up to exhibtion size these can jump out and ruin a print. Having the RAW file is often used as a proxy for having taken the photo, as RAWs aren't ...


27

RAW is not (or minimally) processed image data from camera sensor. JPEG is processed image data. Typically, raw-files from modern cameras have 12-14-bit per pixel which means up to 16384 values (for more details see Michael Clark's comment). JPEG can have only 256 luminance values per RGB channel. This means that jpeg contains much less data than a ...


3

I was wondering what would happen if you were to add an adjustment (contrast, hue, color balance, etc.) in Photoshop/Lightroom/etc., export, then reopen to do the very opposite, and repeat the same process hundreds or thousands of times? That depends on what the adjustment is. More specifically, it depends on whether making the adjustment and exporting ...


5

Actually, if you're doing these edits in Lightroom's Develop module, or Adobe Camera RAW, it will have no effect whatsoever, other than where you finally end up in your adjustments, because ACR (which is the codebase behind Lr's Develop module) performs non-destructive editing. What you're editing every time you open and make a change on the file, is just ...


1

This is not an artifact of the Sony file format, but is related to your lens. All lenses have some amount of optical imperfections/distortion, but camera manufacturers now are compensating for these imperfections through the use of software-based "lens correction". As the earlier answer explains, one software is displaying the image with the lens correction ...


4

When you are opening the images with FastStone, you are likely seeing the JPEG preview generated in-camera and attached to the raw file. If your camera is set to apply lens correction or distortion correction then it is likely being applied to the image when the JPEG preview is generated. Lightroom generally ignores in-camera settings for things such as ...


1

The look you are desiring is as much about the light being shot and the exposure levels chosen as it is about the film itself. Instax seems to be fairly low contrast, less saturated, and slightly cooler in temperature than what most digital cameras output by default. But if you look for photos tagged with "Instax" on flickr, you quickly see the wide variety ...


1

You can get a result like this by creating a duplicate layer on Photoshop, and giving it a Gaussian Blur, then lowering the opacity of that layer. This gives the image a radiant glowing effect. Also, Joshua Cripps does a good tutorial on this effect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGNctntIOx8 Hope this is the effect you're looking for


0

Short answer: No. DPP has no add watermark feature. There is a convoluted way to add watermarks via Digital Photo Professional, but it isn't remotely efficient enough to make it worth the trouble. Once you've done all the editing you wish to your file, you can use the compositing tool to combine that image with another. Although the compositing tool can ...


0

The manual doesn't mention the word "Watermark" so I would have to say no.


1

The result would be this: In the case of this picture it might be an improvement because the missing part was not the most interesting part (not the eye-catcher) of the picture and it being blurry after reconstruction from the thumbnail does not completely ruin the picture. In other cases, though, this method will make faces look like ugly blobs next to ...


2

A quick Google search led me to a tool in GIMP called the "Resynthesizer Tool," which is apparently GIMP's version of Photoshop's Content-Aware Fill. Here's a video tutorial on using the Resynthesizer Tool. Hope that helps. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEV0X5WNRVY


1

This anwer has a good chance to be voted down becouse I am not answering your question if it is a good alternative. Sometimes I want to edit my photos and looking for an appropriate software. The thing is we do not know what you want to "edit", what you consider "appropriate" enough and what is your workflow. "Editing" can go from just rotating a ...


1

I think Pixeluvo is a great Alternative for GIMP, but not so for RAW Processing. Have you ever tried Darktable? It's one of the best RAW Tool for Linux & MAC. Darktable in Combination with Pixeluvo is my Dreamteam for Picturemanipulation & Processing.


0

It looks like the term losee is most likely a typo, but for what it is worth, here is the answer that I ended up discovering. The possible file formats were jpeg tiff psd dng And the answer was jpeg.


-2

As you know, digital images are a paint-by-numbers system. This is binary math using only two digits, the zero (0) and the one (1). The word digit is Latin for finger, and its root comes from the fact that we often count using our digits. The bottom line is: a digital image file can contain a googolplex of digits. How nice it would be if we could figure out ...


-3

"Lossy" refers to lossy compression. The most significant format using this is JPEG. Lossy compression is a slight misnomer. What actually happens in JPEG conversion is that the data is slightly modified to facilitate better compression. The actual compression of the modified data is not, itself, lossy ( typically it's Huffman encoding ). The ...


15

I'm 99.99% sure that this is just a typo for "lossy". I've never heard of the term "losee" and can't find it in search, either. Especially if it just appears in a review question and not in the rest of the text — it's probably just an error. A lossy format, of course, is one which discards (hopefully mostly imperceptible) information in order to achieve a ...


1

In the past, I have used ImageMagick to perform all sorts of complex distortions of images to straighten, de-skew, etc. Unfortunately, the tool is command-line oriented (it's not a GUI tool), but it provides you a lot of control over what you want to do. Your case is covered in the Circular and Radial Distortion Methods of the online user guide.


2

Camera Raw filter only works with 8/16-bit RGB images. Even if you're intending to print the image, I suggest you do your edits in RGB, then convert to CMYK in the final stages of editing. CMYK has a smaller colour space than RGB, so you'll have more colours out of gamut and shadows can be rather blocky. Switch the image to RGB with Image > Mode > ...



Top 50 recent answers are included