Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

Instead of a preset, select "Unconstrained". Then select the "handle" on the desired edge with the mouse and move that edge only. It is a fairly rough method, but you can hold the Ctrl button while using the mouse to prevent it from snapping to grid, so you'll have finer control. Once you're close, you can right-click, and select "Use crop box size and ...


0

If the double-exposure effect you're going for is the traditional multiple-exposure look of images overlaid on each other, you can simply place each image on a separate layer and adjust the transparency of the top layer(s) or multiply the layers. If the double-exposure effect you're going for is the one-image-inside-the-head of a portrait, you place the ...


1

I am not a pro in editing, but I would try to select the affected areas in LightRoom (or Photoshop), and reduce the brightness of the bright areas ('Highlights' slider). Alternatively, you could change the curves and basically cut off the high end. Both should result in the bright, whitish areas becoming less white and bright, and blend in better. There ...


1

You can easily do it with free Faststone Image Viewer. Select images, then go to Tools -> Batch Convert Selected Images, then click in Advanced Options and in tab Watermark or Text select the text you want to place on your photos (data from exif and/or your own text).


2

You can use ImageMagick to add text to photos, either overlaid on the photo or on a border. See the annotation section of the documentation for a number of examples. Because ImageMagick is a set of command line tools, you can easily incorporate it into batch processes using shell scripts and other scripting tools. Example: I've got a photo of some flowers, ...


0

I am worried about the idea that all must be done automaticly. Here is an image of the result you could get with an "automated process". Now imagine seeing 10 of thoose slides... Boring... Now imagine that you insert one by one, resize, fit, organize, etc. Now the image has meaning. Because it is inserted one by one, resized, fited and organized. ...


4

At a pixel level, you want to blur the lighter pixels horizontally, without blurring the picture as a whole too much. I took two times two similar steps in Adobe Photoshop to create the picture below. The first two steps: I selected the white colors using the "Select color range" tool, selecting an almost white pixel and using a large range to select ...


6

By doing a quick edit using Fourier Transform as described in this Imagemagick tutorial I managed to considerable reduce the annoying effect when viewed at 100%. A more thorough edit using this method might provide better results, but the repeating pattern appears so often that some areas of the picture are basically left without any detail.


1

I won't answer the original question about correcting the image, because in my opinion a coin is not good enough. Instead my workflow would be 1) Use a sheet of paper with a printed grid. Like a flip chart paper used in presentations. This is because you need aditional information like a 90 degree angle. 2) You can put some marks with a marker, for ...


-1

Photoshop has great tools to correct lens distortion and has developed a lot of profiles to adjust lens distortion. Also Lightroom has an adjusting tool. If you shot your pics with a smartphone or any mpu-enabled camera, you should find angle and focus distance in the EXIF data, then you should be able with some math to achieve true dimensions.


2

To me, the whites are indeed blown out and overexposed in many, if not all of them. My guess is that she simply changed the levels or used curves in post-processing to get this effect. As a test, I grabbed one of the images and looked at the image and histogram. As I suspected, the highlights are blown out. In the attached image, my editor shows the ...


1

Try Dehaze in LR or ACR. If that does not work for you, try experimenting with vibrancy/warmer white balance/clarity applied gradually over the area with the haze. The tool names probably differ in non-Adobe products...


-1

Add a sky. I just quickly tried with Paint.Net (not the most advanced tool ever) and current sky is selected perfectly by the wand mode. Then steal a nice looking sky from another of your shot, put into a layer behind, and blend. Really quick editing on the already processed jpg, sky kindly provided from the city of Amsterdam:


2

Recent Adobe Lightroom (& Camera RAW) versions have a feature called "dehaze", which is designed specifically for this sort of thing. It's a little more advanced than just levels adjustment. I've had mixed success with it - sometimes it looks good, sometimes the resulting image has excessively muddy shadows. I believe it works a bit like auto levels but ...


0

There are several types of "editing". For example: 1) Just adjusting contrast, brightnes, etc. Advantages on doing it on a larger file. None. 2) Sharpening must be done on the final image, for example on your 500x500px one. 3) If you need to get detail from an image, for example take a specific sample on some point of the image to make the white balance, ...


0

If you mean scaling: You should do most of your edits on the original image size. That way you edit once and resize/reuse the final result for print (large size) and viewing on the screen (smaller size). If you do the edits on your 500x500px, you need to do it all over again for print and again in few years when resolution of displays increases and you will ...


3

You will not get the same result at all. When you start with your 2000x2000 pixel image you have some scene or subject in it. If you crop it down to 500x500 pixels then you will only have 1/16th of the subject in it. However if you have a 500x500 with the same but lower resolution content, you will have an entire subject. What you can do instead is scale ...


8

You say: When I select the Perspective tool and click anywhere in the canvas, the grid appears, already scaled to just the subject Emphasis added, because that's important. This is not the normal behavior of the perspective tool. Normally, if you just click, the grid will cover the entire image. It sounds like you have your subject pre-selected. You ...


2

Try to look at the histogram of the pictures. Is it unbalanced to the left? If so, you may be tricked by the preview screen. Also, could it be due to the screen you are using, which has poor contrast or low backlighting? Note that, typically, laptop screens don't have much contrast unless you set the backlight high or if exposed to sunlight.



Top 50 recent answers are included