Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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0

It was made the same way horizontal - but real - 360° panos are taken. A row of individual images, stitched together with the aid of some stitching tool.


2

First, that's not a 360° panorama, but a 180° one. However, that doesn't change how this was done. This image was made by stiching together several more narrow-angle images. This process is generally called making a panorama. Some camaras have panorama capability built in. You take a few picture in succession and the clever firmware finds the ...


0

Of course you cant convert it to a quality image. All you can do is to retouch the image with best possible colors. It might take a while, but definitely looks better than the existing one.


1

You do not say how you obtained this image at this pixel size or how it was generated. If you know you should say as it has a marked effect on the answer. The answer is "no, because..." but the "because" varies with the above answer. This is NOT noise in the sense that it is usually meant. As presented the 'noisiness' of the image has been caused by ...


0

Well, in general, if the noise distribution was completely unknown, then you would not be able to do too much. Fortunately most of the noises of high ISO are of known types (see this link), and their stochastic process or random distribution is known, and this offers some ways to remove some of the noise. Now, this is pretty much heavy math that you ...


8

Similar services that you mention are performed commercially. A popular model is that photographers would send all or a culled selection of images to the company and they will further cull and perform basic editing on the remainder. Charging Method Charging is rarely done by the hour since speed is greatly dependent on skill level and a customer shouldn't ...


4

This is noise and the rule with photos is the same as most things, crap in, crap out. You can't magically generate information for an image that isn't present in the first place. You can reduce the quality, either through reducing resolution or averaging pixels (which effectively reduces resolution). This averaging tends to make random noise go down ...


1

Whether this is better or not is highly subjective. It definitelly looks blurred compared to original, but we also have to be aware that sharp noise on top of a slightly blurred image makes the latter sharper. This is what I've done: Copied image layer and applied High pass (1.0) on it Inverted the grey layer and then set it to overlay Copied the same ...


2

I think the basic answer here is: you see only seeing developer-oriented documentation because this is an unfinished feature. If you're looking for end-user documentation, wait for Gimp 3.10, where GEGL is the default, and then all of the up-to-date docs will automatically apply. (And, really, you probably won't need 'em, because it'll just be in-place ...


0

There's a Nikon endorsed photographer named Cliff Mautner, and he said in couple of places that he does not do post processing. All he do is cropping and minor changes and he just chooses a good natural light and go with it. Apart from him, I have not seen anybody who claimed not to post process. So it really depends on the photographer but I think 95% of ...


1

If you are not using calibrated screens, then you will get this kind of issue. The Mac screen may be particularly bright and if it isn't calibrated to be comparable to the other screens, then you will end up mixing the image darker than in needs to be to look correct on the other displays. Building an ICC profile for all the displays will allow for the ...


1

You can try layer via cut instead of copy If you have an image which has a large distance range in it (e.g. close distance shots instead of panoramas) you can imitate the distance function by first duplicating the background and blurring it. After blurring the duplicate, you should add layer mask and change the layer mask to a gradient in the direction of ...


0

First make a duplicate layer and place it above the original layer. Then select the portion you want to blur [On the duplicate layer]. Right click the selected portion and give a 'feather' value of between 15 - 25. Go to Filters > blur > lens blur. Play with the values until satisfied.


1

You can use IrfanView (freeware) for batch cropping. First, get the position and dimensions for the part you want cropped. The easiest way to do this is just open the photo in IrfanView, and drag with the mouse to draw a box on your photo. The title bar will display the size and position of the selected area. Then go to file menu, and "Batch ...


4

Yes, Lightroom has a batch crop. You first of all apply a crop to the first image. Then in the library grid view, you right-click on the first image, and under the header "Develop Settings" you chose "copy settings". You then select the option "Crop" and deselect all the other options (unless you also want to copy those to the batch). You then click on ...


4

If all your images are of the same size and you want to crop it to the same dimensions, you can use ImageMagick to get the job done. Take a look at the Crop details so as not be surprised by its behaviour :-)


0

For anyone else coming across this question and going down the GIMP + scripts path (like me)... Check the software that came with your scanner! I was all ready to run the post-processing scripts only to discover that my scanner's crappy software (the MP Navigator EX that comes with my Pixma MG5200) already broke up my multiple scan image into separate ...


3

Samuel, as some of the other answers have suggested, layer masks are very useful for this sort of thing. I wish I had learnt about layer masks earlier in my journey (and you may already have done so given the age of this question!) But in case it's useful to others who land here, here is my explanation of layer masks, and how they can be used in this ...



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