Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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50

Gimp is great, but it's not without some shortcomings. Photoshop is a big-time commercial project with a lot of funding, and while Gimp's development community is awesome, there are a lot of areas which could be useful to photographers where Photoshop is ahead. I've tried to enumerate these here as fairly and as realistically as I can. Adjustment layers. ...


49

If the dimensions of the image are multiples of 8 (or 16 if chroma subsampling is used) then the rotations are lossless. Otherwise it is not possible to rotate the image without recomputing the blocks i.e. recompressing the image, which is lossy. The reason for this is that jpeg images are broken up into a series of 8x8 or 16x16 blocks which are compressed ...


38

Hugin (based on Panorama Tools) is a good open-source option, and is multi-platform.


36

Editing is definitely not unethical (making a deceptive photo can be unethical, but it is also easy to deceive in-camera, it's the deceiving part that makes it unethical not the editing) There are two very different types of photography - there are photos that are intended to show what something really look like (photojournalism, pictures for eBay listings, ...


35

Although Philip's answer is the best way to go, it is possible to do what you want entirely within the sphere of JPEG. JPEG works by breaking your image up into blocks called Minimum Coding Units (MCUs), typically 16×16 each, and compressing them separately. You can see this in images when you crank the compression level up very high. At more ...


31

I would like to add my technique! Scan the photo once as usual. Rotate the photo 180% on the scanner and scan again. In Photoshop, un-rotate the second scan. Import it as a layer on top of the first scan. Auto-Align Layers using Photoshop command. Assign second scan 50% opacity to blend images together. This technique comes from observing that the ...


29

You are right, that is a personal question and it will vary tremendously, some situations like fast-moving actions will often get a higher hit-to-miss ratio, so I do not think you can get a useful numeric answer. My motto for this is 'Delete is my friend' :) I first delete anything that is not technically perfect (with extremely few exceptions, less than ...


29

There is a good book which indeed does talk about photographing a canvas. It is the first book I would recommend someone who wants to learn about lighting. It is called Light: Science and Magic. (At this point: Anyone wants to have the previous edition of it? I think I'll get the new one. ;) ) The thing about the canvas is (I guess you have noticed so far ...


26

The camera manufacturer can sometimes offer an excellent RAW->JPG convertor. One reason to use the manufacturer's software is that no one else knows better how to interpret the RAW information. All the light and lens-specific data especially can be quite tricky to fully interpret and post-process by other than the manufacturer of the camera. In the ...


26

There are a few, but two of the best are: The Gnu Image Manipulation Program (quite powerful) Paint.NET (not as powerful as the GIMP, but very good)


24

Like John, I can't really speak for pros either. I think it really depends on the person, as some people like to do post-processing, and others are real sticklers about doing everything in camera, with minimal (if any) post processing. A couple landscape photographers I like span the range. Joseph Holmes is a great photographer who doesn't seem to do much ...


23

For photos? Not too much, actually. GIMP lacks automatic HDR processing. It doesn't have adjustment layers - although you don't need those too much for photos. Photoshop's Hue\Saturation dialog is superior. Photoshop CS5 has content-aware fill, which GIMP lacks, but there's a GIMP plugin called Resynth that does about the same ...


23

If you don't have it, I'd recommend Adobe Lightroom and then use Gimp for the occasional 'advanced' edit. Most of the reasons are already outlined in this question. Photoshop is nice, but its not meant to deal with the huge number of photographs you can do from a real shoot. Its a workflow thing. I find 90%+ of the basic tweaks I need can be done in ...


22

Increasing the Brightness tries to preserve the highlights while increasing Exposure will scale everything. This image demonstrates it nicely: source: http://lightroomkillertips.com/2010/lightroom-exposure-vs-brightness/


21

Exposure has a stronger effect on the highlights. Brightness has a stronger effect on the midtones. To quote from the Lightroom user manual: Exposure Sets the overall image brightness, with a greater effect in the high values. ... Brightness Adjusts image brightness, mainly affecting midtones. ... Set the overall tonal scale by setting ...


21

The 27" LED mac displays are "full gamut" displays, ones that cover around 98% of the Adobe RGB gamut. These are full 8 bit/channel (24bit) screens and offer a full 178° viewing angle. They are much higher quality displays than your average LCD screen, and specifically designed to output high quality, rich, saturated graphics. Additionally, Safari, which I ...


20

Nice question. This is an issue we all face. My answer has two parts: 1) keep as much as possible 2) religiously tag your photos in an organized way. 1) Why keep as much as possible? Your perspective changes with time and 20 to 30 years later your photos acquire a historical value that transcends their artistic value. I discovered this when I started ...


20

One result of using a polarizer is the deeper blue skies; that effect isn't hard to replicate using software such as Photoshop, Lightroom, Picasa, or the GIMP. Another important reason a polarizer might be used is to reduce glare and reflections. The best example of this is if one is photographing a puddle or pond; without a polarizer the surface will ...


19

Have you taken a look at Darktable? It seems to be open-source and Linux-only. Feature description It needs to be fast It is quite quick and supports computations on the GPU using OpenCL. Scriptability It supports scripting using LUA. This is a pretty recent feature (as of '15), so the API is still small. Keyboard-based interaction mode You can do ...


19

Considered by whom? This is both an issue that has intrigued and bothered people since the dawn of photography and a still-emerging topic that is far from settled. So, in a larger sense, there's really no meaningful answer, just a series of opinions. But, in a specific sense, there certainly can be an answer. The definition you've taken above has a very ...


19

The point to remember here is that you lose quality when saving the photo into a lossy compression format. So long as you save the photo in a lossless format (PSD, TIFF, etc) after adding the border, you won't lose any more data than you've already lost by saving the photo as a JPEG in the first place.


18

Since the noise is periodic, your best option is to Fourier-transform the image and filter out the specific spatial frequencies of the noise. This way you will preserve a lot more detail than with any gaussian-based filtering. I don't know whether Photoshop can do that, but here is an example using ImageMagick.


18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate ...


17

Alignment of multiple images taken from the same point If you are not making a panorama, but just aligning an image stack for focus stacking, exposure fusion or HDR, then align_image_stack from Hugin project is one of the simple yet very useful tools. For example, if your have 3 files a.jpg, b.jpg, c.jpg, to align them you may run: align_image_stack -a ...


16

I use AutoPano Pro (commercial, 99 € -- Mac, Windows, Linux) with great results. It merges photos together automatically and is able to blend together photos with several different focal-lengths and even exposures. I now usually just hand-hold a series of shots for a pano rather than bothering to set up a tripod. As long as I am zoomed out enough to crop off ...


16

This may seem biased/unfair, but GIMP has awful usability. Disclaimer: i have used both, although recently i use photoshop much more. In terms of functionality, GIMP doesn't tread much behind photoshop (for simple photomanips and adjustments - i don't do HDR), but layer manipulation and general use are tortuous (IMHO). I never couldn't do a task with GIMP, ...


16

I would read this article for information on stacking and how to properly stack photos: http://www.naturescapes.net/docs/index.php/category-technical/145-long-exposure-astrophotography. The relevant information is farther down in the article. Looking at your shot, it appears that there is a fair amount blur, I'm guessing due to incorrect auto-tracking? ...


16

Curves is a powerful and very flexible tool, which allows to control brightness, contrast and color balance very preciesly. The way I approach the curves tool, either in Gimp or in any other editor is two-fold: (1) The curve defines how to change the intensity. Its left side is for the darkest parts of the image, its right side is for the brightest part of ...



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