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43

What a critique isn’t: There’s no better way to say it… A critique is rarely short, because it is specifically designed to provide the artist with detailed, constructive feedback. It’s primary purpose is not to make the photographer being critiqued feel good (though that’s not to say that it can’t be a side benefit), or bad (though again, this can happen as ...


37

A technically correct photo should: be sharp rather than blurry be focused properly rather than on some random AF point be properly exposed have correct color balance not have too much noise


25

For start, one should be aware that technical correctness is no substitute for artistic vision. Here are some technical criteria in no particular order: The exposure is correct, shadows are not lost, highlights are not clipped The parts that need to be in focus, are in focus There is no motion blur (caused by camera shake) The photo does not have a color ...


21

I would like to recommend one exposure dot com. I recommend this for two reasons. The critique is honest, harsh, informed, and deep. As a community, they strive very hard to give very in depth reviews and suggestions. They also have the added benefits of extreme honesty, which is sometimes hard to get. One thing I dislike about flikr is precisely the fact ...


10

Well, for Flickr, I'd say that the photographs that get noticed are often by people that are group active rather than necessarily all that good. Not to say that there aren't great shots that don't get noticed otherwise, but if you look at "interesting" you'll find some that aren't really all that interesting at all, just that they got a lot of group hits. ...


9

There are not many great places to get such feedback. One site that I use is 1x.com, which is known for only accepting the absolute best work. They have fantastic art there, and its useful as a milestone...if you get something accepted, you've really improved your work! Even if your art gets rejected, you can still submit it for critique. The community at ...


8

Projector native resolution needs to be taken into account. This will often be no higher than about 1024 x 768 in cheaper or older projectors. If you drive it at higher resolutions or at different aspect ratios it may convert internally but you are at the mercy of its processes. A very major and often overlooked factor in using a projector is that what you ...


6

I’m going to suggest that all critique can be valid. It doesn’t really matter that much to me if somebody is being sarcastic or they have a strong view they want to express. Whether or not you pay attention to them seems like it’s going to come down to personal choice. To me, the deciding factors are: Have they said something constructive, which can be ...


6

There are two things I can see going on here. First, different understandings of what "critique" is within a given context, and second, interpretation of writing tone on the Internet. What is meant by "Critique"? Critique can mean a lot of different things. There's a good answer on photographic critique here on this site, and I think it's also useful to ...


6

What, exactly, makes them complain about poor picture quality? If you're shooting an uncalibrated projector toward an arbitrary projection surface, you've got a lot of things working against you. First of all, your color configuration is liable to be all over the place. Secondly, you're going to be at the mercy and the reflectivity of your wall. I'd ...


6

I am certain there are no such generally-accepted criteria, because there are too many variable factors. Even technical aspects of image quality are subjective, and one person's "too much blur" may be another's "sense of motion". I'm sure many specific contests have their own scoring systems and scoring rules, to help with consistency across years and ...


5

Focussion This site uses a "token" system to encourage helpful feedback. You need to give feedback to get these tokens, and you can spend them to upload your own new photos. If you write really good feedback, other photographers may mark your feedback as helpful, and you earn even more tokens.


4

Here: http://www.reddit.com/r/photocritique /r/photocritique has a lot of people from reddit.com/r/photography. The subreddit is active and anyone can participate, there's no requirements like on other critique sites. Most pictures, no matter the quality, seem to get a least a couple comments.


4

I would say that critiques worth listening are those of people that make photos that you see are better than yours and you really like. When I just started taking pictures I had no clue how bad I was, so even if it was rather unpleasant, first rough critics I got have been useful for me. On the other hand some great achievements (like Columbus' discovery ...


4

All of the example pieces in Mike Johnston's humor piece are highly-regarded and successful photographs by some of the most accomplished photographers in history. But the humor is more than just "Haha! Those commenters didn't know that they were looking at something famous!" After all, that just comes down to the logical fallacy of appeal to authority. ...


3

Also for completeness: Flickr has this group: http://www.flickr.com/groups/photographycritique/ You can post a picture and ask for critique.


3

For completeness sake, you can post a picture in the photo.stackexchange.com chat room and request feedback on it there.


3

The first question you need to answer here is "What is a good picture?", unfortunately this is subjective, and also context-dependent. Consider, if you will, a blurry photo (for example, due to motion blur, lens shake or just plain out of focus). Is it good or bad? From what I've said so far, who can tell? If it's a shot from a wedding, from the paid ...


3

This site is no longer online KarmaCritic is a site where the more good feedback you give others for their photos the more prominence you get for your work. The feedback is peer rated, and the submissions are not. On many sites, the lesser work often gets the least replies, but often are those that need the feedback the most. I think the concept is ...


3

http://photocamel.com Billed as "friendly", it does seem to both provide critique without holding back. Depending on your genre, it has professionals who visit and will give critiques. At least I can vouch for Kids/Family and Portraits.


3

photoSIG [The following was edited in by @Jerry:] PhotoSIG attempts to "encourage" users to critique photos that have been submitted by limiting the number of pictures a user can submit for critique based (in part) on the number of critiques they've written. Many pictures are nearly ignored, and a high percentage of "critiques" that are written are strictly ...


3


3

I think one of the points of the page you linked to (as well as poking fun at armchair critics on the internet) is that different advice applies to photographers at different levels of ability and experience. When you are beginning photography, it is helpful to follow some simple guidelines for good composition. When you are a proven master (like the famous ...


2

The essentials of a "Technically Correct" image would be: Sharp Correct Exposure Correct Focus (Auto-focus should take care of this) For the most part, if you use good equipment in auto mode and avoid things like camera shake, your camera will take care of the technically correct part. As long as you know how to avoid the big issues, you can take a ...


2

I'm the developer for OnShutters which allows voting on both photos and critiques and therefore encourages thoughtful critiques. StackOverflow style. You are welcome to take a look and provide feedback. Thanks.


2

Digital photography school (DPS) has a nice critique section on their forums. The community there is fairly nice, but they are still willing to be critical. This would be my first recommendation, especially as a beginner. DPS has strict requirements when posting such as EXIF info, picture size, and specific questions. That said, it's one of the better ...


2

"Another option is at photo.net, but they have a bit of a reputation for being a little harsh in their critique. That might be fine, but it's something to keep in mind." Personally, I have gotten very sparse feedback from here. 0/5


2

Facebook has been very valuable to me for attaining some feedback from all sorts of folks . . . but if you're looking for great feedback from like minded, photography enthusiasts, You can go wrong with Photography Corner: http://www.photographycorner.com/ Enjoy and good luck! -pmk


2

Jay Lance's answer is great but I would like to suggest a slight modification in the ordering of items. Specifically, our natural tendency is to deliver the good news first, and the bad news last. While this approach has the advantage that the recipient will consider the negative feedback more seriously, it has the disadvantage that ending on a negative note ...



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