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by damned truths

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11

There are several key points, of which I will pick my top ones. The human vision system will re-focus very quickly, and only at what it is looking at in that moment. It is therefore difficult to look at a scene and see any kind of out of focus blur. This will cause humans to not realize the effect of certain areas being out of focus — you can't trust your ...


8

Absolutely. I was actually just noticing this yesterday. I was comparing my photos I take now from those I took 2 years ago. Aside from the obvious stuff, like different location, better technical skills, etc, I was trying to figure out what I used to do differently. I was better then than I am now of paying attention to tiny details that make interesting ...


7

Yes, left and right do matter. A lot of people claim that (at least in cultures with left-to-right writing direction) pictures where the "flow" of the picture is left-to-right (subject looking, pointing or moving to the right) feels more natural and peaceful while right-to-left creates more tension. So if you want a picture of a girl looking peacefully ...


7

You're very wrong about the human eye being a very mediocre optical device. The brain processes the image, but your eye gathers and focuses the light, for being so tiny, and made out of flesh, it's quite amazing. So amazing, that scientists still haven't been able to replace it. The real quirk is to train your mind to think like the camera, and not the ...


5

I used to teach this stuff at the university but it's long ago. Let's see if I can remember: The brain does some interpretation of the raw signal. We have 3 types of cones (B, G, and Yellow) and then the lowlight rods (bluish-green). So you see already now that we process that to see reds, and it also shows how easy we can get defects that alter our colour ...


5

Most of us develop favorite subjects or activities after shooting a while and we gravitate to the same lens to do it. That leads to a rut. Break up the routine: Adjust your camera to shoot black and white in-camera. Refuse to use your "go-to" lens and go wide-angle or grab a macro lens. Spend several hours exploring things close up. Get a tilt-shift or ...


4

There are some things that two dimensional photos have trouble doing. One of them is portraying a place we experience in three dimensions and translating that place into two dimensions without something being lost along the way. OMNIMAX/IMAX Dome theaters try to deal with it by curving the screen around the viewer so that the visual experience includes the ...


3

Depth of obvious to us in the 3D world but when things get translated into 2D via photography, we lose depth-perception and the brain must therefore interpret signs in the images in order to see its depth. The primary perception of depth in photographs are objects at different distances. As our eye sees these objects in diminishing size, we interpret them ...


3

Regarding the latter part of your question, how our human vision and its "quirks" affect how we use a camera and how we photograph the world around us. I think the single most valuable piece of advice I have found regarding photography was from an article on Luminous Landscape, part of the series "Aesthetics and Photography" by Alain Briot titled: "How ...


3

Actually, there is an aspect of the subjectiveness of human vision that I would like to highlight. I said subjectiveness because what a camera see (either digital or analog) is what goes on the photo-sensitive sensor/film, and the information is just what colour hit that surface. In human beings, what actually sees is the brain, rather than eyes. Human ...


2

I don't know whether colour detection decreases equally for all colours, that's straying a little bit into the field of human biology! However I do know that our monochrome night vision is totally different to looking at a greyscale image. I believe the brain knows the colours are really there and so suppresses the fact that you can't see them from ...



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