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15

Fine art paper is usually made using 100% cotton rag content, is most often acid-free and therefore is suitable for archival purposes since it addresses the problem of preserving documents for long periods (see "How Long Will Your Photo Prints Last?" at PhotoShelter Blog for example). It qualifies as matte paper, thought it certainly has a texture, a look ...


10

A few random thoughts, from which you can draw conclusions: seamless paper is cheaper but it's an ongoing expense, the cloth would be a one-time purchase the cloth backdrop requires being kept clean easier to pull the seamless out a long way and run it curving down onto the floor and under your subject for, um, more seamless look, especially with a white ...


10

It is like normal paper, except that instead of just paper or plastic backing, it has a sheet of Mylar between the paper and the emulsion. It is high gloss, and high contrast, abolutely ROCKS black and white prints. Really gives them a lot of depth when they have a good strong light source.


8

Short answer: no The two different types of paper with the same mass would only have the same thickness if they had the same density. Photo paper would have a much higher density than card stock, so 300gsm photo paper is actually quite a bit thinner than 300gsm card stock. 300gsm card is actually quite thick: Whereas 300gsm photo paper (shown here: ...


4

Yes, the color gamut of a high end dye printer is generally superior to pigment and pigment ink is generally superior to chemical photo paper. In longevity pigment ink and good archival papers can actually out endure chemical photo paper now as well. In general, you actually see it the most with the depths of black, but when comparing anything pigment to ...


4

I run a print business and have tried a LOT of papers... My favourite by a long way for framing is "semi-gloss" or "Lustre" - which has a slightly textured glossy surface - a bit like old silver-halide "Wedding paper" as I'd call it. The Lustre finish has a slightly more pronounced texture. Dont bother with lamination for a framed picture - it can ...


4

Using the built-in printer paper profiles and allowing the printer to manage color will usually result in very saturated and unrealistic color. This is because you are printing with what is called an unmanaged color process. The way to resolve this is to use the .icc color profiles with an ICM, or Image Color Managed process. Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom and ...


3

If you are looking for a quality photographic ink jet paper that will work for both Canon and Epson printers, you can look at some of the companies that have been making paper far longer than either of those two: Hahnemühle , Ilford, Museo Fine Art, Moab (Legion) Paper, etc. Can't guarantee that the price will be much cheaper (may be more expensive, ...


3

If you're looking to print your own, I can recommend Red River Paper which has papers specifically designed for post cards. They're a company specializing in photo paper, and their post card paper meets postal specs (at least here in the US).


2

I have been playing with these 2 options myself - so far I do find that the seamless paper is the better option, I find the canvas is a real pain to keep clean. However paper is heavy to keep around, bulky and needs replacing. I also found lighting the paper easier - possibly my canvas wasn't opaque enough?


2

You could give some of the luster papers from MOAB paper a try. I would specifically recommend their Lasal Photo Luster paper. It has a nice gloss on one side, and matte on the other. The gloss side is really the only side that is intended to be printed on, however if you print any backing on the back side first with a light ink, let that dry, then print ...


2

When choosing matte photo paper in the print box, the printer uses PHOTO black ink. The ONLY way to get MATTE black in to work is to use one of cannons "fine art" paper selections. I printed test prints on each setting using cannons color profiles each time using matte once and photo rag once. Then used the manufacturers for photo rag and matte photo ...


2

I've had the most success with a "pearl" or "satin" paper. It is kind of a hybrid between matte and gloss. As far as the picture sticking to the glass, you really want to get it drymounted to something like FoamCore. At our custom frame shop we use Elmer's foam board and spray 3M Super77 on the back of the photo then press it on to the board.


2

They aren't doing any magic beyond what can be done in Photoshop. You can read yourself in the FAQ: What photo restoration tools do you use to restore my images? Our restoration team is expert in the use of Adobe Photoshop. What training do your photo restoration technicians have? Our artists have been through formal training in color concepts, ...


1

Canon's LUCIA-12 (Pixma Pro-1 and photo wides) uses a Chroma-Optimizer ink to selectively clear coat areas to balance the gloss level. It works quite well in my opinion. The CO cartridge is also part of LUCIA-10 (Pixma Pro-10). I've personally used it with Canon's Pro Platinum, Pro Luster, and Semi-Gloss Plus papers with great results and consistent ...


1

Just to be sure here...you are taking high key film photographs and you are looking for a photographic paper that will bring out detail in the upper highlight range? Something you will be exposing via either contact print or enlarger? I ask, because film can also be drum scanned and the digital file printed via ink jet...and when it comes to ink jet papers, ...


1

Do different types of paper with the same weight necessarily have the same thickness? No. BUT papers with the same "gsm" 'weight' rating do all have the same area for a given weight. While, on reflection, that's an almost trivial statement, it's also more useful and (a little) profound than may at first be obvious. Read on ... In the following ...


1

The best example that I have found so far is this: Canon Photo Paper Pro Platinum: 300 g/m^2, thickness 0.30 mm. Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper: 350 g/m^2, thickness 0.57 mm. Even if we take into account the slight difference in the grammage, the latter paper is more than 60 % thicker. (Caveat: There are many different ways to measure the thickness of a ...


1

300 Grams paper means: An A0 sheet of paper (1 m2) weights 300 grams. So essentially the thickness is not mentioned in here. I think that the thickness of different types of paper of the same weight (matte, glossy, etc) do vary a bit, due to chemical treatments of the paper and/or different production methods/materials, but not very much.


1

I'm not sure how thick the paper you're talking about is, but I have a Canon Pixma Pro9000, and because it has a straight paper path as an option, I can run large (13x19") and thick papers through it. I've used some heavy duty papers and not had any difficulties. The printer is not all that expensive for the quality and reliability I've gotten from it.


1

An alternative suggestion: Look at the Canon Selphy line of printers. They print on postcard size paper that is sturdy like a postcard. In addition, they also apply a coating that creates a waterproof card, suitable for actually mailing. You can find these printers for $50, and supplies are about $12 for 36 prints, so about $0.30 each. (cheaper if you ...


1

Check high-end art supply stores as well as camera stores. I'm going on my experience here in Vancouver: the most reliable selection is actually Opus. They do online ordering, but I don't know their shipping situation, so I mention it more for the general idea to check art stores. The good local camera stores (there are a couple, we're pretty spoiled ...



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