Incense

by Bart Arondson

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43

I've had to preserve whiteboard scribbles a few times. The problem is that you usually can't control the lighting and it's rarely good. The technique I've converged on is to take two pictures. With the camera on a tripod, take the first picture of the board as is. Then erase the board and take the second picture with exactly the same settings. Now ...


39

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture. I've only done one ...


38

Hugin (based on Panorama Tools) is a good open-source option, and is multi-platform.


22

Doing HDR first has advantages: the HDR process is working on a smaller image size, and you only have to stitch one set of images. But the disadvantage of doing the HDR step first is it becomes more difficult to exactly match the tones between sets of images, so when you stitch them together you get more obvious seams. If you are able to control this and ...


20

You're right — Hugin works very well for this. This is from a series of pictures I took with a P&S Fujifilm camera at the Children's Museum. It's not an action shot except in the sense that all pictures of children are action shots, but the process is pretty much the same. Photo by me. Licensed CC BY-SA 3.0 in this size. The images were all hand-held ...


17

Apart from the the answers suggested by others, I recommend a few other tips. Based on what I read. Shoot the pics in Vertical mode. You might have to take more shots, but you'll realize at the end that the edge distortion is less when you click in Vertical mode. When you shoot in horizontal mode, you end up getting the edges cut when the final output is ...


16

I use AutoPano Pro (commercial, 99 € -- Mac, Windows, Linux) with great results. It merges photos together automatically and is able to blend together photos with several different focal-lengths and even exposures. I now usually just hand-hold a series of shots for a pano rather than bothering to set up a tripod. As long as I am zoomed out enough to crop off ...


16

In addition to the answers presented already, there's a huge potential disadavantage of stitching first - the stitching programs might decide to stitch each exposure differently leading to misalignment when you do the HDR. Unless the stitching program lets you repeat the warping with different images this could be the deciding factor in which to do first. ...


15

Technically any software that is capable of stitching regular photos would be capable of stitching macro photos as well. However, to be able to accurately stitch photos they need to be taken with little or no parallax (movement of the camera's optical centre). This is typically achieved by rotating the camera/lens about it's optical centre using a "VR" ...


13

I tried a model like this in the store, both horizontally and vertically. I was not satisfied with the quality. The particular model that I tried used seemed to be using the HD video imaging pipeline to do its stuff. Also, when used vertically, it required you to change the orientation of the camera by 90deg. In the end, the small dimension on the pano was ...


13

Go to the signage printing industry Sometimes technology intended for one industry is perfect for another industry and this is a case in point. Find a small business near you that specialises in printing large vinyl signs for the advertising industry. Their rates are usually significantly cheaper than photographic printing and the results are every bit as ...


13

I believe the Horizon camera is an example of a slit-scanning camera. During the exposure, the lens assembly rotates from one end of the panoramic field to the other. A narrow slit is used to ensure that only a thin line of film is being exposed at any instant. The result is that the whole image is exposed using the center of the lens, which can form a ...


12

In addition to the format limitation you mention (can't do 2x2, 4x2 etc.) you also can't choose the panorama projection. The sweep panorama will use a cylindrical projection, which is usually the best choice, however it does bend straight lines. Up to a certain width of panorama, the rectilinear projection is usually better. See: ...


12

You have two excellent answers already, but as @Maynard has enquired about alternative techniques, there is another option if you have a flashgun with a stroboscopic mode: http://www.flickr.com/photos/javo_noso_comio/3414155008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/14643312@N02/4510423513/ This basically works by firing the flash multiple times during a single ...


12

What you are trying to construct is a parallel motion panorama. Its been on my TODO List to do so far a while but I have not done it myself yet. Microsoft ICE supports this. It is the only software which I know of to do automatic stitching of parallel motion panoramas. You will find that option under 'Camera Motion' below and to the left of the preview ...


12

A panorama is, in its original usage, a wide angle horizontal image. In fact, it's a horizontal image painted in a complete circle around a room. That was in the late 1700s, though, and by the time the idea got to photography, it had been watered down to some degree, generally describing any image with a field of view greater than 100º, and then eventually ...


11

As others point out, there is no standard. I personally use somewhere between 2:1 to 3:1. I like 3:1 because 36x12 inch frames are easy to find and therefore cheap.


10

Let me advocate for offline printing for a second :) I used to print online, but I rely on a local print shop nowadays. I'm not talking CVS or Walmart (in the US), but small, quality print shops run by photographers. Not only is it good for the local economy, but you won't beat that kind of interaction. Print professionals are passionate about what they do, ...


10

These VR images are usually shot with standard camera as a multi image panorama, and then processed in software. The easiest way is to use a special panoramic (sometimes called VR) tripod head which pivots the camera about the exact centre of the lens in order to ensure the photos line up and there's no paralax error. Shooting vertically with a wide angle ...


10

I regularly take photos of whiteboards sized 3' x 4' or larger with my cell phone camera to record meeting notes, and it produces passable results. The D90 should absolutely kick butt on this. The two factors you want to avoid are glare and motion blur. As Guffa mentioned, you want to avoid glare from ambient (room) lighting, so get into a position as ...


10

Exposure. Contrary to the conventional wisdom I don't think you should necessarily lock exposure when shooting panoramas. Instead use a metering mode that considers the whole scene (not spot metering), or shoot manual, and get a lot of overlap between images. If you do this the exposure shouldn't vary too much between adjacent shots. The idea of locking ...


10

I can't settle for an alternative that's not vertically 360 degrees (or at least much more than 180 degrees). A camera that shoots in every possible direction is said to have a field of view of 360 (horizontal) x 180 (vertical) degrees. Having more than that means you will be capturing some or all of the scene twice. Consider an imaginary arc that spans ...


9

I use Autostitch (for iPhone too). Super easy and very good at stitching


9

On Mac, I had bad luck with Hugin; it kept crashing. YMMV. DoubleTake ($25 currently) seemed promising, and is almost a one-step solution, but didn't seem to have vignette removal. My best results have been with Photoshop's Photomerge. On CS5 (don't know about <=CS4), it has vignette removal, and the stitching is very intelligent. I ended up with a ...


9

PTGui (commercial) works fantastically well. It is available for Windows and Mac OX.


9

I used to use Hugin which is open source project. It is able to find correct exposure for most cases, even if You weren't exposing separate shots in the same way. F.ex. here I have made some basic RAW->TIFF processing and put it into hugin:


9

I'm going to need to answer these in the reverse order and I'm going to assue you're probably going to be blowing these up quite large. If you're going to move the camera several feet to get the shots you want, you're going to get some sort mismatch when you stitch. If you're then going to blow the pictures up large, it's very likely going to look some ...


9

Pan0.net I like pan0.net most of all. It is free, fast, and makes the panoramas look impressive. It uses a Flash-based spherical panorama viewer, which you can even embed into your own site or blog. Unlike Gigapan, Panoramio and similar sites, pan0.net takes care of perspective transforms, and allows to view the panorama as if you were rotating the head in ...



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