India Point Park

India Point Park
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14

The scene you were shooting (bright spot light + darkness) is actually one that's most prone to flares. This happens will all filters, but some have less flare because they have better coating. Lens construction and coating of its elements also matters. A simple comparison: no filter better filter (Marumi DHG Lens Protect) worse filter (Hama UV 0-HAZE ...


14

Thats actually a UV filter not an ND filter, very different filters :) Anyway, lower quality filters flare more, if you want to continue to use a UV filter consider a multi-coated filter. It seems other people who bought that same filter had similar complaints, see the 1st review: "However, I had to return this item since they DON'T contain any ...


11

Firstly there are a couple of general reasons raw and JPEG images differ in size, and raw differs from the actual number of pixels on the sensor: Whilst JPEG image dimensions don't have to be multiples of 16 (or 8 if not using chroma subsampling) it is more efficient to do so, as it allows you to rotate the images without re-encoding (lossless rotation). So ...


10

Actually it is slightly more misleading. 480,000 pixels normally equals 1,440,000 dots but they do get away with only 480,000 actual dots (not pixels) by using something called field-sequential display which is basically 480,000 dots which change colors very fast, sending information for each primary color sequentially. There are only 480,000 dots but since ...


10

There is an excellent article entitled "How to Photograph the northern lights" that basically states with a point and shoot, it's very difficult to get good pictures. It looks like your camera is one of the higher-end, it should be alright, they have some specific recommendations that I've copied below. It also gives a list of cameras that might do the ...


7

Actually, shooting with a compact camera rather than an SLR is part of the problem. Basically, shooting a game at night means that you don't have enough light for decent exposure times. As a consequence, your exposures are long and the moving objects are blurred. The field's lighting are rarely enough to allow you to capture moving subjects with ISO low ...


7

I will present the "quick and dirty" version of my answer, because I could talk on this topic for pages and pages. Essentially the 14mm f/2.5 "pancake" is a prime lens, which means it does not zoom, it has one fixed focal length. So instead of zooming in and out to frame your subject, you have to move your feet along with the camera! The fixed focal length ...


7

The answer is probably more profane than you think: Instead of developing a real sophisticated algorithm to get the best resolution out of the source image, the software developers went the "safe" way: add enough crop that will always and under all circumstances deliver an image that is "properly cropped" (whatever that means). I'm saying this as a ...


6

Your slave flash is not fully recharging before firing at the appropriate time and you're seeing the ambient light. Here's how it works; when your slave is set to a lower output it's actually firing twice because it's 'seeing' the 'pre-flash' from your camera and firing on the 'pre-flash' and the actual flash from your camera. When you crank up the juice ...


4

So, you're right: you're foiled because the Lumix FZ18 isn't an interchangeable lens camera. The adapter you link for is for Panasonic's Micro-Four thirds cameras, like the Lumix GF1, which do use interchangeable lenses. It kind of confusing for Panasonic to use the same branding for both those cameras and their attached-lens models, but there it is. The ...


4

I have a G3, and have really enjoyed using my 3 Pentax K mount lenses with it. Apart from the physical adapter, you will also need to tell the camera to "Shoot without lens" in the REC menu. Apart from the cost savings, you will also get benefits from those old lenses. They are mechanically much more solid, and also (at least for primes) even if you give you ...


4

Other answers cover everything, but to be blunt: it's marketing bullshit. They are counting each of the three color components of the pixels (red, green, blue) as a "dot". People have been making color displays for decades and only recently has this ridiculousness arisen (for displays, you hear these "dots" called subpixels). On the other hand, for sensors, ...


4

I'm a bit skeptical about what they are stating. It says that the viewfinder is "1,440,000 dots equiv". The "equiv" term is an annoying marketing term used when trying to be competitive without stating the true nature of something, they are simply stating it is "equivalent to" such a thing. The Electronic Viewfinder is "equivalent" to a "1,440,000 dot" ...


4

You guys are on the right track. Here's what's happening in each picture: Slave flash off. Your camera fires a pre-flash The camera determines how much flash power it needs for proper exposure based on how bright the return flash is. The shutter opens, and the camera fires its flash at the power level it just determined. You get a medium-bright ...


4

More image information? Yes. Better image quality? No. The parts being truncated don't scale well because of the rectangular pattern of your sensor's pixel wells versus the curved shape of the correction. So a lot of artifacts can show up in those areas. Like many products intended for mainstream consumption (as opposed to niche products used by experts in ...


3

You may have difficulty freezing the action and isolating the subject, but that doesn't mean you can't get some interesting shots: with a little planning and a little luck, you could use the longer shutter speeds to your advantage and get some great panning shots. Also, keep in mind that action blur is due to the subject's change in position, relative to ...


3

From my experience with point-n-shoot cameras shooting sunsets/sunrises I would say the problem is in overexposure. When you try to catch more of what's in front of you the automatic exposure measuring happens on this dark foreground and leads to too bright sky and that really eats out the colors. There is two easy ways to counteract for this. ...


3

iResolution is just an edge enhancement filter. The "i" part in the name implies, like Panasonic's other "i" features, that the camera automatically controls when, and how much, it should apply this feature. What you select is just the maximum amount by which it will do that - it doesn't mean the camera will use it for every shot. Instead it will ...


3

The cameras are very different in technology and design, so the basic answer is "it depends". There are two fundamental differences.... maybe three. Let's call it three: Your Canon 1000D is an interchangeable lens camera. You may only have one lens (and if so, probably a 18-55mm "kit zoom"), but you have the option of adding literally hundreds of other ...


3

The GH4 still trumps the GX8 for serious video work - you've noted the lack of headphone socket on the GX8 which is definitely important, but the DPReview preview notes a couple of potentially even bigger differences: Unlike the video-focused GH4, the GX8 doesn't offer 10-bit HDMI output and can't output video over HDMI at all while recording. If what ...


3

This is working by design. In iA ("intelligent automatic") mode with flash enabled, Panasonic cameras attempt to balance ambient light with flash — dragging the shutter. And from what I've seen elsewhere, it tends to be pretty aggressive with this, resulting in shutter speeds like what you're seeing. So, unless your subject is static or there is a lot of ...


3

Most cameras are set up by default in one mode or another to assume that you wish to use the flash as fill or to illuminate your subject only while the rest of the scene is properly exposed by the available ambient light. Your Panasonic GH4 behaves this way in iA mode. Most other cameras do this when set to Av/A mode. Many cameras have menu options that ...


3

On any iso-compatible flash or camera hotshoe, the sync signal--the one that fires the flash in sync with the shutter opening on the camera--is communicated by the pin in the center of the "square" of the hotshoe/foot. So, to fire a flash correctly, you can use any ISO-compatible flash. It just has to have that square layout, use the rails as ground, and ...


2

To reproduce colour, each pixel needs three dots - one for the red component, one for the green component, and one for the blue component. 480,000 pixels x 3 components gives 1,440,000 dots. When comparing, make sure you compare figures in the same unit (or even consider cameras with an optical viewfinder, rather than an electronic one)


2

I emailed Bristol Cameras asking the same question since they sell a non-brand battery: Your question was: I thought that Panasonic "secured" their cameras so that only panasonic batteries work. For example, the TZ7 would only recognise it if the firmware was downgraded to pre-v1.2. Can you confirm that this battery actually works in the new ...


2

I think it's worth mentioning that as much as specifying the dot for each color separately seems like "cheating", this is also exactly how the ratings for sensors have been done since day one in digital cameras. Just for example, a 12 megapixel camera does not have 12 million sites that each sense red, green and blue. Rather, it has (roughly) six million ...


2

I use an expensive multicoated B+W UV filter and it causes flare too. I'm thinking of removing the UV filters from all of my lenses. The Panasonic prime lenses are good, but not very expensive and in the end it's all about the image quality. I seldom shoot near salt water, at great hights or in dusty environments and I have lens hoods on most lenses.


2

Try taking the photos when the subjects are under a lamp, so there's more light to capture. You might be able to salvage some shots using high ISO and black-and-white. Another option is to shoot video instead of photography - smaller resolution and moving picture are much more forgiving to noise.


2

I can't help as far as dismantling the camera. However I'd venture that most of us who followed the standard procedure to locate dust on a sensor would have results the same or worse than yours. The procedure of taking a shot against a white wall/screen and using autolevels exaggerates the spots (which is the point of the procedure, to help locate them). ...


2

This one does NOT fall into the DYI category. Send it to Panasonic or shop for a new one!



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