Incense

by Bart Arondson

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16

The faster the transition, the greater the chance of causing damage to your equipment. If you want to protect your equipment from failure due to water(ie condensation issues) a slow gradual transition of about 20mins is the best idea. With that said, I have some tips below and if you follow them, you should be able to safely speed up this process. The issue ...


13

Ok, so I totally misread the question. Bulb mode, get your exposure right for the stars behind. Once you have this, set the shutter open for the required time, put the lens cap on / something over the lens (you'll have to count the time, the shutter needs to stay open). Have your girlfriend stand where you want here, charge the flash and set it for the ...


11

You're right. The atmosphere has a prismatic effect, spreading white light out into its constituent colors. As the sun moves down to the horizon, you the viewer move into the orange-red band of light. The lower the sun can get, the more red the light will be. The atmosphere is also a diffuser. The more of it there is between you and the light source, the ...


11

The 50mm 1.8G is a great lens. But there isn't going to be a huge difference in image quality using any of the 35mm or 50mm primes. I don't think anyone but you can really answer which one is more suitable for you. There may be some situations where you can only get so close, or so far, to frame your shot, and one focal length or the other might limit you ...


10

A lens hood won't do you much good if the light source is in the frame. In this case, the things to do are (a) use high-quality, well-coated lenses, designed for digital if you're doing that (i.e., the rear element is coated) and (b) minimize extra glass in the optical path - remove UV filters, etc.


9

When shooting red flowers I usually have to tell the camera to underexpose from what it thinks is the correct exposure. I don't know if the D5000 has separate histograms for red, green, and blue. If it does then you can use the red histogram to make sure you're not blowing out the red highlights. Otherwise you'll have to check the picture and on the camera ...


9

Here are some easy tips from my experiences as a parade and convention photography and what I learned from a conference on war-time journalism. Get more batteries Get more memory cards, many medium sized ones are better than one large one Get a faster lens Get an outer garment that identifies you front and back as a photographer Take just the camera body, ...


9

As a very general guidance, you should place the sun at the 3/9/12 o'clock position of the subject, and try to avoid the 6 o'clock position. That is, the left, right, or behind the model (back lit), and try to avoid direct sunlight straight onto the model's face. Why not straight on? the model will have a VERY hard time keeping their eyes open, and ...


9

The standard answer most time this is asked is don't assume everything was done for a reason, the camera may have already been set to ISO 800 and the photographer might not have had time to change it. However, this image looks like bright daylight and so ISO 800 seems way off, but in this case the image brightness is a bit misleading, 1/500s f/2.8 ISO 800 ...


8

Maybe to avoid some blur on the dog, the woman or her clothes due to wind for example. I guess any blur on the trees wouldn't be noticeable with this DoF. The relatively high ISO allowed for a much faster shutter speed, which makes everything in the picture a bit more "frozen".


8

I used to think the same way, but then I realised how slow ~1/100s shutter really is. In my work as a machine vision engineer I am used to thinking of the shutter as milliseconds, rather than as fractions and for dynamic subjects (relating to its speed) general walking speed has to be faster than 10ms (1/100!), so with "fast" subjects you need only a few ...


7

Short answer: get yourself some good, rechargable NiMh-AA with low self-discharge (see extensive list here on Wikpedia), at least two sets buy a good recharger with discharge-function and peak-detection (delta-Voltage) like the Technoline BC 9001 Longer answer: you asked for energy-solutions people use for flashes: see the linked (and recommended on ...


7

I'm a novice in the field, but here's what I'd do: do NOT use flash (it'll blow out your subject and darken the background) crank up the ISO to 1600 (D7000 should produce great images at that ISO), this will allow you for faster shutter speed and sharper image p.s. pro's are welcome to correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still learning :)


7

As it's practically a once in a lifetime situation you might want to consider hiring a professional photographer. If nothing else it should eliminate the stress. The other thing to do is PRACTICE. Practice, practice, practice. This is one of the things that separates professionals from hobbyists. Take the camera with you everywhere and take a shot of ...


7

Back in the 35mm days, the 50mm was the default lens focal length. It was believed that it allows for most shooting styles with some compromise. That assumption was based under the dominant aesthetic of the time (60's and 70's IIRC). In the 80's, consumer cameras (such as the Olympus Trip) came equipped with a 35mm lens. This made it easier to use them in ...


6

So the other posts are correct in that the red channel is being blown, but what you really want to know is how to overcome the issue within the camera without post editing. The Nikon D5000 has the Picture Control System giving users the ability to customize image capture preferences. Six settings are available — Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, ...


6

What you can try if you want a nice background is to first set up the picture so that the background looks nice. Maybe some deep blue skys at this time of night. Do this in Manual mode. Then when you have the background looking nice, bring your girlfriend into the photo, keep the same settings as before, but use the sb900 to light her. It won't matter if the ...


5

I live in Colorado, and spend a lot of time around the Rockies. While the mountains do indeed have an effect on the time and length of sunrise and sunset, I wouldn't go so far as to say they eliminate Golden Hour. The old adage that states golden hour hits its peak a few minutes after sunset holds truest in the mountains, although it may be more like 15 ...


5

Sounds like a fantastic shooting opportunity! A couple of suggestions that spring to mind: Use the surface reflection of the water. If there are lights nearby you'll get some great effects with them reflected across the water. Likewise that "brilliant architecture" you mention should look even better with a rippled reflection beneath it. If your camera ...


4

Mountains definitely affect the timing of sunrise and sunset. As you mention the sun will drop below a mountain earlier (and rise a little later) than it would on a plain. Still the light can be very beautiful. I am not sure if the length of the good light is affected by mountains, but it is certainly worthwhile to arrive at your location about an hour ...


4

If anyone is interested, my colleague and I have developed a free tool for computing the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The image in the example is for Chamonix in France. I'm a photographer myself, and that was one of the reasons why we made this. Very useful when going on a shoot. Just go to ...


4

There are plenty of types of AA batteries that could be useful depending on what you want to do: Lithium AA batteries - Last ages but they are expensive (usually more than the rechargeables each time you buy them) and single use. High power AA rechargable NiMh batteries - 2500mAh lots of power as long as you charge them before each use. Always ready AA ...


4

If the sky is completely black, it will be almost impossible to get color in the background and also have a sharp image of your girlfriend, even at high ISO. However, at 9:00, depending on where you are and the time of year, the sky might still have a little glow. Try this: Turn off your flash (for now.) Face toward the west, where the sky is (hopefully) ...


4

You can think of the sun as your key light, or hair light, or (if you have some powerful lighting) even a fill light; you place the sun according to which role it has to play. Same thing about reflectors - they are just light sources, with very narrow beam and weaker than the source they are reflecting. A midday sun is like a ceiling lamp - not really good ...


3

The SB900 will obviously not light the background, so you would need a slower shutter speed to brighten the background. If using exposure compensation you might set it to +2.0 or higher. You then may need to set the flash compensation to a minus setting to avoid your subject being too bright. Easier is set the camera to Manual. Take test shots without ...


3

My money would be on unadulterated ambient light. Once you learn to decompose studio light, you see it everywhere in natural images, however it is possible to overanalyse. Late evening sun gives you the highlights you see in addition to filling in the shadows light a softbox. It may be the case her face was lightened in PP. It also gives you the same bokeh ...


3

There are mainly two factors that can cause this: The red channel may be over exposed, so the red colours are simply blown out and all detail is clipped. Red colors have fewer distinguishable nuances. We can see a lot of differnt blue nuances, a bit fewer green, and quite few red. You simply can't expect to see as many details in a red flower as in a blue ...



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