Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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13

Many older or cheaper phone cameras use a "fixed focus" lens. ie it is always set to focus a specific distance away from the camera. This is usually set to the "hyperfocal distance", ie everything from half that distance out to infinity is in focus. This depends on just what is acceptable as 'in focus'. But most photos from these cameras will be sharp ...


4

They are referring to the amount of clearance between the lens rear element and the sensor. The C mount flange focal distance is 17.52mm so both of these lenses have rear elements that stick into the camera body. This fact is most relevant to SLR cameras that have a mirror which moves out of the way when a photo is taken, a lens that sticks into the camera ...


2

The light IS (inversely) proportional to the focal length. A long telescope at high magnification sees a dim image. Binoculars are short, and see a brighter smaller image. Yes, a 200 mm f/4 lens is 2 times the diameter, and 4x the area, which passes 4 times the light, compared to a 100mm f/4 lens. However, focal length also involves magnification, and ...


1

I think you may not be factoring in the distance needed to make the image the same. If the image isn't the same then the light can't be the same and so you have to factor that in. You are right that the bigger lens collects more light at the same f-Stop because the iris is an actual different size. But you're assuming the same distance, and that's not how ...


1

From what I know back focal length depend of the optical construction of the lens. And it is important for mirror cameras. For example you can't mount EF-S lens on fullframe camera because last element will interfere with the mirror (which is bigger than APC cameras). P.S. Above abbreviations and explanation are related to Canon cameras and lens, but IMHO ...


1

why is the photograph taken by the camera is square-shaped? The shape of the image is determined by the shape of the sensor, not the shape of the lens. Sensors are generally rectangular for two reasons: 1) rectangular photos fit better into rectangular books, frames, etc., so people expect photos to be rectangular; and 2) it's easier and more efficient ...


1

The simple answer is you can get shallow depth of field (hence bokeh) with any camera system if you focus close enough. Finite depth of field arises due to the inability to focus light coming in at different angles in the same plane. When light is focused at the wrong distance is appears as a spot the shape of the aperture, instead of a point. Large ...


1

You mentioned four factors from your reading (lens diameter, lens size, distance ratios, and print size), but the only ones that really matter are the first two - or, more specifically, the lens iris (the diameter of the opening that lets the light in, not the physical lens diameter) and the lens focal length (the distance from the center of the lens to the ...



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