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1

Because light tends to come from above us. You need proper diffusion to make it work well, but light coming from slightly above tends to look the most natural. This is also why strobes are setup slightly above eye level in studio environments as well. If the flash came from below, then it would cast odd shadows from the cheeks and nose and eye sockets, ...


0

If you want really cheap, all the Yongnuo flashes with names that end in EX can be used as a CLS slave with i-TTL, although I believe only the YN-586EX can do FP/HSS and not all the models come in Nikon versions. Yongnuo will put gold lettering on the Nikon versions of the flash, silver letter on the Canon version. And yes, even the Canon versions can be ...


2

Since you asked this question, Nikon has come out with the SB-500, which I have and I love it. Works with CLS, so you already have a trigger. It's very compact and also has a 3-LED video light, which is fairly unique and could come in very handy for video or other uses.


1

There are several methods you can use to fire the 430EX remotely, and while most require additional equipment, not all of them do. Canon wireless e-TTL (IR) Canon has two built-in wireless systems for remotely firing flashes with its cameras: a radio system and an infrared system. None of your units speak the radio system, but the 430EX can be used as a ...


0

I'm using radiopopper nano transmitter and receiver to fire my 430Exll from 6D.


4

I'd suggest lighting her with a flash that would mimic the way the ambient light looks. My idea - put a full/half CTO gel on the flash so it has the same color as the lights, use a softbox/umbrella (preferably a small softbox with a grid as it's quite focused) and place it on that side of her face that is lit by the christmass lights. You can now limit the ...


4

Whenever you add light you change the way your image will look. I could think of two things: You could try backlight. Some kind of halo effect, possibly placing a light behind her, this may allow you to lower your iso and maintain "some" contrast, but I cannot really say how far you can go You could try (possibly with a softbox or an umbrella if you have ...


1

Logically, if you're lowering the sensitivity of the sensor, you must increase the amount of light hitting it. I guess you can't switch to faster lens else you would have already done so and you've said it's impractical to take a longer exposure. On the other side of the equation, you can increase the ambient light or the brightness of the fairy lights if ...


0

The 600EX-RT doesn't have a built-in dumb optical slave, it only understands the Canon wireless communication systems (optical and radio), which the Fuji doesn't speak. However, you could stick a dumb optical slave (such as the green-based Sonia optical triggers) on the PC port of the 600EX-RT, and trigger the flash manual-fashion if the Fuji's pop-up flash ...


1

You can buy cheap flash triggers that will trigger a flashgun via a PC cable or hotshoe adaptor. They just look for a flash of light, then trigger the connected flash. May be enough for you if you're using the Speedlite in manual mode and the Fuji is only generating one flash (any pre-flashes for red-eye reduction, or ettl metering would need to be disabled) ...


0

Doubtful. Canon's flash system uses a special set of pulses to communicate flash power information and sync details to the flashes in the system. It is unlikely that your Fuji camera implements support for this protocol and without that support, you can't remotely fire the 600EX-RT. There are other third party speedlights and strobes that you can get ...



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