Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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0

No. The noise is in the photon count, and it is the square root of the number of photons. So if you get 9 photons, the noise level is 3 (33%); if you get 10000 photons, the noise level is 100 (1%). Photons are not perfectly distributed over space, but randomly, and even at perfect 0 K, different receiver buckets will catch different amounts of photons each ...


0

There are two plugins that really help when high ISO has been used: NeatImage and NoiseNinja. I personally bought and use NeatImage professional to get rid of image noise. It does a fantastic job but it cannot fix a bad shot! Shooting RAW is also helpful as you can change the exposure a few steps without destroying the image.


0

It just seems as though sometimes the simplest answer is often overlooked. I don't know how experienced you are with photo editing, but I just did a couple of very, very basic things to alter the picture you used as an example. It wasn't a big process using Photoshop either. (Not sure why my entire answer nor the edited photo didn't appear here, but my ...


2

Measuring QE without a NIST-calibrated standard is nontrivial. It's even harder when you have to deal with the analog gain applied prior to storing the RAW image's A-to-D values. On top of that, the QE is strongly wavelength-dependent, so unless your project is using lasers or other narrowband sources, you are in a deep pile of youknowwhat. If you do have ...


0

I do agree with previous posters about the poor quality of that image, but you can fix things to some extent with software like Nik or Topaz Labs. A white sky can become (almost) beautifully blue with them and you can improve noise and other problems. Proper photography software like Lightroom or Capture One would do too, but it wouldn't be as easy. ...


6

The photos can be improved, but you would have to pay a retoucher and even then with such a high iso the photos are going to look poor. Maybe pick out a few worth paying a retoucher from the actual day and do a reshoot with someone that knows what they are doing. I spent maybe four minutes in lightroom working on this. Adjusting contrast, black levels, white ...


3

Certainly in terms of the example you've provided, I would suggest looking at how you can recrop images to minimise the impact. In the example image, recrop the photo to a landscape, with the heads near the top, so that you can eliminate the sky. Unfortunately, there's not much that you can do about the overall lack of composition; at the end of the day, a ...


3

Information that is not there is not there, there is no magic against that fact. What you can do is de-noise them in professional software (for example Lightroom). They will certainly look better (the obvious color noise would be gone), but they will never get get crisp and sharp like an ISO 100 shot. As others mentioned, there are other problems with the ...


0

Like MirekE said, check your ISO setting. Most likely it got changed whether on purpose or by accident. You want to have it set on a lower number like 100 or 200, to get less grainy pictures. If it is turned up higher than about 1600, you may start seeing grainy results.


1

Check your ISO setting. If it is set to a very high value, you might see lots of noise in your images.



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