Incense

by Bart Arondson

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

30

The best way is to use the lowest ISO possible (100 is often the best), and slightly overexpose (without clipping highlights), then post process it back down. This will help to decrease noise in the shadows. Also shoot raw, so that any adjustments can be made before the conversion to jpeg.


25

Noise is often defined as any deviation from a "pure" signal. The signal is taken to be brightness pattern of the image so any variation in the pixel values that represent the image is noise. These variations arise principally due to: Shot noise. The random way photons are emitted from a lightsource causes random variations in image brightness. The fewer ...


25

"Expose to the right" means record the brightest image you can and then reduce the brightness in post to achieve the desired level. The word "right" comes from the histogram, where conventionally brightness increases left to right, thus increasing brightness shifts the whole histogram to the right. ETTR helps reduce noise simply by capturing more light, ...


22

Keep the camera as cool as possible! High temperature increases the thermal noise in your images. That's why certain astrophotographers actively cool their camera!


21

You can reduce noise without lowering ISO by slightly overexposing your picture, especially if you shoot RAW. From the Expose (to the) Right article at Luminous Landscape: A 12 bit image is capable of recording 4,096 (2^12) discrete tonal values. One would think that therefore each F/Stop of the 5 stop range would be able to record some 850 ...


20

Cost. Every price raise results in fewer sales. Size. Cooling has to fit somewhere, those handgrips are already full of batteries... Weight. There's a reason P&S are popular and not lugging around a brick is one of them =) Battery Life. Cooling costs energy, lost energy means fewer shots in each battery pack. Minor Improvement: only shots pushing ...


15

This looks like the effect of noise reduction at high ISOs. Heavy NR is common in compact cameras with small sensors. Fujifilm does it better than most, but there's only so much blood you can get from a stone. On most modern high-megapixel point and shoot cameras, you'll see this even at low-ISOs if you pixel peep. It's important to note that in most cases, ...


14

A few options for reducing the noise other than lowering the iso or increasing the light: Keep the camera's sensor cool. Take a burst of photos, then average them. Lower the resolution.


14

It's effective. Basically, the camera can use the second, dark frame, to subtract signal out of the first frame, so it definitely gets used in RAW. In fact, if you try it, you'll discover that you end up with only one RAW image as the DFS image is discarded after use. On this topic, however, I'd note that you want to use this carefully. If you're doing long ...


14

To minimise noise get as much light down the lens as you can. As you have a static subject using a longer exposure is probably the best option. Setting the ISO to the minimum value will help you let in more light. Select the aperture based on sharpness, I'd go for something in the middle like f/5.6 For the ultimate noise reduction, consider taking multiple ...


13

Well, perhaps you should have gone out after all :) The noise is thermal noise, which will become noticeable as your sensor heats up during a long exposure. In astrophotography, it's quite a common problem. Some ways to reduce such noise: cool sensor down, e.g. by shooting in the cold weather. Note that cold also negatively affects battery life. set the ...


11

If you shoot in RAW, the in-camera noise reduction probably does not take effect, and if it did, it is really reducing the value of RAW on your camera. When you shoot RAW, you really just want the original output from the sensor with as few modifications applied as possible...none at best. You have far more control over noise during post processing, and far ...


11

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...


11

When I have extremely noisy images, I do two things: Use a 3rd party noise reduction plugin - in my case I use Topaz DeNoise - it, and others, have free trials - so you could give them a try if you want to experiment. These denoise plugins have sliders that will reduce noise, which softens the image, but you also have control over detail (you can decrease ...


11

The long exposure Noise Reduction takes a "dark frame" after the real shot, and then uses the noise pattern from that image to reduce the noise generated by the sensor. That's why the exposure takes twice as long as this NR were disabled. Long time exposure can increase the sensor temperature, and increased temperature also means more noise. So you should ...


10

The last two are really the same thing and works due to the fact that in most cases noise is just as likely to push the value of a pixel up as it is to pull the value down. Let's say the 'true' value of a given pixel is 100 (out of 255). Take 10 images of the same scene in noisy conditions and you might record the following values: 104, 99, 98, 100, 101, ...


9

Set your ISO to as low as you can. And if you'd like, take multiple exposures and average the results. Because you're on a tripod, the shutter speed won't matter so much. One thing that will definitely help, though, is to use the timer function (ie, take the shot 10 seconds after the shutter is pressed) so that you're not touching the camera when the shot ...


9

In general, the camera's manual will tell you the operating temperatures for the camera. Like all pieces of electronics, excessive heat isn't good for it. That said, I've only seen anecdotal evidence of heat adversely affecting image quality. It seems more common for batteries to stop working. As for noise, you're probably going to have this issue in broad ...


9

Firstly had you lowered the ISO whilst staying at 30s f/4 you wouldn't have ended up with any less noise. There's probably nothing you could have done to prevent the noise, I presume f/4.0 was the maximum aperture and if you went any longer than 30 seconds you would get star trails. You might even get less noise if you raise the ISO but that's another ...


9

The key difference between the two is that one works on a post-digitized image, where as the other works on the pre-digitized analog signal. Whenever you work with an analog signal, you have the ability to be more precise and accurate, and can eliminate noise before it is "burned into" a digitized image. Thats most certainly not to say that applying noise ...


9

There has been an improvement between the 40D and 650D, but not that great. Certainly less than a stop. You'll get a far far greater improvement in image quality by getting more light onto the sensor. There are a number of ways to achieve this: Depending on what lens you're currently using you may be able to get a three stop improvement by switching to a ...


8

The usual recommendation is to start with removing the color noise. So you would move the color slider until you remove any visible color noise, and not cause any color shift to the photo. Once you are happy with that step you can move to the luminance slider and again adjust it to remove the luminance noise, - you need to remember that when the luminance ...


8

In general I wouldn't recommend doing anything in camera that is irreversibly "baked" into the image, as such things can always be done better, with more control, and more importantly the option to undo, in post on your PC. There is another feature called Long Exposure Noise reduction which shoots a black frame (i.e. one in which the shutter is closed) in ...


8

Lightroom and Photoshop aren't really (supposed to be) competing products -- they're complementary products that overlap. Lightroom is all about managing your workflow, which just happens to include image processing in most cases. Photoshop, on the other hand, is image processing to the max, but it doesn't really do much to help your workflow. There's ...


7

Provided your ISO100 image was not underexposed I wouldn't expect a noticeable reduction in noise (except maybe in the deep shadows) with the 5 1 second ISO1600 images blended together. In the infamous other thread I demonstrated that a 1/30s ISO100 will contain more noise (lower signal to noise ratio) than a 1/30s ISO1600 image. Same amount if light but ...


7

Simple answer is YES! Noise is an undesirable artifact, and many operations can enhance its appearance, not just sharpening. Tweaking curves, adjusting contrast, working exposure, etc. can all have some impact on the noise that is present in an image...although sharpening tends to have the greatest impact. It is important to handle the bulk of your noise ...


7

It is poorly written. Indicated Green Background refers to the list below where lenses models with stabilization are highlighted with a green background like the AF-S 16-35mm in the wide-angle section:


7

Active D-Lighting Active D-Lighting isn't necessary at all. It works by doing two things: slightly underexposing (by 1/3 to 2/3 stop) and applying some adjustments to raise the shadows back up It isn't needed if you shoot RAW as you can underexpose and raise the shadows in post It is only relevant if you are shooting high dynamic range scenes with bright ...


7

This is normal considering the high ISO you are using on that camera. If you look at samples for each ISO with the Canon 7D, yours show more noise than the ISO 1600, similar to the ISO 3200 crop. Notice that I only shot full-stop ISO which is important with Canon DSLRs because the gain to obtain the 1/3 stops in between is applied in software by the ...


6

The pro's are self-evident: Lower noise on high-iso The biggest con: Loss of detail The high-iso noise reduction might remove detail mistakenly. While newer camera algorithms have gotten better at it, it's still not fool proof. The settings between Off, Low, Normal and High dictate the amount of tolerance used for the setting, which affects the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible