India Point Park

India Point Park
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0

Both Canon and Nikon are producing very good quality videos (and of-course photos) in their mid range DSLRs. If you taken the high-end D-SLRs, then you can see Canon EOS 5D mark X is used by many videographers around the globe. This is mainly because Canon have a vast area of video expertise as compared to the Nikon. Although Nikon was the first company to ...


0

Raw files are basically digital negative of an image. At the same time jpeg is optimized output created by camera. jpeg cannot contain so much data that a raw file can, so its impossible to convert a jpeg image to raw.


1

It could still be your shutter speed (since you didn't say you tried different shutter speeds). To test this, take at the exact same exposure settings but without flash. If the top of your picture looks the same as the top of this one (in the shadow) then it's still your shutter speed being too fast. Or another test is to just put your shutter speed ...


3

There exist methods to do this, but as Alex. S also points out in his answer, there are no standard tools that I'm aware of that will do it for you. In principle, it's a straightforward problem. While there are a vast number of mathematically possible raw files that are consistent with the given JPEG file, the vast majority of those are not likely to be the ...


4

1/2000 is the time the shutter is open. What you are looking for is frame rate, frames per second (fps), and the two are not directly related. The D7100 maxes out at 5-7 fps. The mirror lockup seems to be for only one picture at a time (p. 61 in the user's guide), and won't increase the frame rate. You can get a higher frame rate with video: Your camera ...


4

You cannot (should not) produce a raw from a jpeg. Theoretically it would be possible as compressed NEF is based on a TIFF container and a "wide" JPEG/JFIF variant IIRC. And all is not lost as, having run these kinds of competitions, I can say that you may still be able to enter depending on what type of competition it is and why they want raw files... ...


26

In addition to the points Alex S made, you need to consider why they want RAW. There are several possible reasons: Bit depth as Alex S said. JPG suffers from compression artefacts which RAW doesn't. Blown up to exhibtion size these can jump out and ruin a print. Having the RAW file is often used as a proxy for having taken the photo, as RAWs aren't ...


27

RAW is not (or minimally) processed image data from camera sensor. JPEG is processed image data. Typically, raw-files from modern cameras have 12-14-bit per pixel which means up to 16384 values (for more details see Michael Clark's comment). JPEG can have only 256 luminance values per RGB channel. This means that jpeg contains much less data than a ...


4

This isn't just one company creating their own buzz, and corresponding buzzword, for marketing purposes. This has been an important advance in optics in general over the last 15-20 years. The technology is still in its early phases, where there is a lot of proprietary knowledge being closely held by the companies that develop this. I suspect it will be ...


0

See this thread at dpreview.com. Several people have posted there that they have the same problem with the J1 using the 10-30mm. Nikon issued a service advisory to correct/repair a design flaw with that lens.


1

My guess, without more info is that you have accidently changed your camera's mode to 'manual'. Press the 'Menu' button, then click 'Exposue Mode' using the control dial. Next choose 'P' for program mode and press the Menu button. The camera should now take pics normally. As an aside, the 10-30 lens has free update available to correct a focus problem if you ...


0

I had the same question a while back and the advice I was given was to use the kit lens at aprox 35 and at aprox 50 for what I would normally photograph, and then analyze the pictures afterwards and decide which look I preferred. One thing of note, is that its not just focal length that is different, but also background compression. In otherwords, the 50mm ...


0

These two lense are mostly equivalent in a lot of things--build quality, price range, focus motor features, image quality, age of design... So the one big difference between them is 35mm vs. 50mm. 50mm is special in one way. The magnification of the lens most closely matches that of the human eye and there's little distortion. In other words, if you ...


0

Not sure what you mean by "adjust", but yes, the flash does need to recycle after every shot. At low power (1/8 power or less), a speedlight can do this pretty fast. Just for a random number, at 1/32 power, perhaps it can recycle at 8 flashes per second. Your flash manual should have a chart about repeating flash, giving acceptable flash rates at each ...


0

My preference in this case would be the 50 mm lens, because my interest is in landscape photography. While the 35 mm lens would give you a better field of view, it's better to use a 50 mm lens and then get to the desired field of view by compiling a panorama, as that yields a higher resolution image. Even if the resolution of the picture taken by a 35 mm ...


0

I have both lenses. Both are awesome lenses. For 35mm you will get some more wider that's all the difference.


1

As indicated above, it is what you want the lens for that will be the deciding factor. I would also emphasize using the kit lens at 35mm and 50mm to see what you will like best. Tape the lens so it won't zoom when being used after setting the focus. However I have the 50mm f/1.8 lens for portraits, and am not happy with it. It works just fine, but I should ...


7

If you can't get you Sigma 70-300mm lens to fit on your Nikon D5000, it is likely the lens is made for a different lens mount system than the Nikon F mount. Sigma and many other lens makers produce many of their various lens models in multiple lens mounts. What this means is that for a particular Sigma lens design, such as a 70-300mm DG Macro, they produce ...


4

Assuming you're not talking about the normal exposure interval delay in closing the shutter after opening it, you should never experience any noticable delay in opening the shutter after pressing the shutter button unless: Your batteries are low. The self timer is slightly engaged. There is an electrical fault in the metering system. The batteries ...


0

If you are limited in how long you can expose for, then I recommend using a higher ISO, such as ISO 1600 maybe even 3200, use short exposures of around 30 seconds, and get many of them. I would say get at least 16x, however 25x or 36x would be better. The reason you want to use a high ISO is the higher the ISO, the lower the read noise in most cases. The ...


3

The Nikon FA manual is interesting reading... On Page 39 there is a description of the exposure metering system that I think explains the delay you're encountering. Basically, when using one of the automatic modes, the metering system reads the exposure data and compares that to the patterns (about 30,000) stored in memory in order to determine the correct ...


0

there are rigid limitations to the P900 and long exposures - its virtually impossible to do a long shutter release, particularly for starlight.


3

In the Incandescent menu, just adjust the dot back to the 0,0 center position of the colored grid.


4

You appear to have a Nikon camera. On all other brands, one chooses from a list of ISO sensitivities or Auto. The camera then uses the specified ISO for every option other than Auto. With Nikon, if you have Automatic Sensitivity Control enabled in the Shooting menu, then the camera will use selected ISO as the default and actually select another ...


3

You've tested with multiple cards/readers. That's definitely indicative of a problem with the camera itself. Some additional tests are:- plug a cable into the camera directly. copy the files to a different machine. You might have a USB problem there that you didn't know about. view the nef using different software (for example ViewNX.) copy the same ...


1

FWIW, there is wider sleeving that will hold four strips of 3 6x7s, such as this sleeving material. If the scanner only detects the first two frames, then after you've scanned the first two frames, maybe you can insert the film upside-down to get the scanner to detect the last frame, then rotate that scan afterward.


1

If you are under the same lighting conditions and have the same settings selected when manually pushing the shutter button each time (the flash always fires) as you do when using the self timer (the flash only fires once), then it appears that the limitation of only the first frame firing the flash when using the internal flash (see pages 70 and 148 of the ...


0

Ok I don't really understand what he wants to do either but Philip Kendall has a point saying : The answers will be completely different for "show a few photos on my phone >to my family" and "get published in National Geographic" So Ill answer your question and give you my thoughts if it was me . A safari like that is most likely pretty expensive so ...


1

Wasting a sleeve is the right way to go unfortunately. If you're extremely careful yes they will barely fit in as 3s, but I've found that they'll slip out one edge and damage your film if you breath wrong. Definitely do not go with an internegative (rephotographing your negatives) process, I'm not sure where that came from.


3

The lens and camera are probably "good enough", but they're ( of course ) not ideal. Unless you've a very large budget they're as good as you'll get. An ideal system would be much larger ( heavier and costlier ) and be more complex to use ( which is itself a handicap ! ). Better the equipment you know than something you don't. Given that wildlife shots ...


-2

Don't have enough reputation to comment but I totally disagree with Philip. He told us what he wants to do with it. Though to be fair the answer is still subjective. I say absolutely not, 450mm (300mm plus the crop factor since it's an APS-C sensor) will not get you far enough away from tigers. Nikon just released a very affordable 200-500/5.6 which is ...


1

Ok, I see the problem you're talking about - but only just. My first impression is that the diagnosis from Nikon is quite plausible. My second thought is that the reason you don't see the artefact in still is because it possibly only is visible if you drastically underexpose the shot like you did in the video. Try taking a correctly exposed shot of a pale ...


1

With the internal flash? Not with the internal flash. The internal flash will fire only one time in any continuous shutter mode, including self timer. See D7200 manual page 70 and also 144. You can however use a hot shoe flash the way you want, but not the internal flash.


0

Actually, quite a few problems. Just my personal opinion, but you'd be better off saving pennies and getting an APS-C 50/1.8G or 35/1.8. The only reason to go to the vintage glass is if you like being a stubborn cuss, with a fascination for vintage glass, who does stuff just to prove you can. Who also knows how to accurately grade a vintage lens both in ...


0

Don't worry about the pins, as long as you can handle manual exposure, aperture and focus. You will need to shoot in manual mode and tell the camera to expose when it thinks there is no lens attached. Most likely though you will not be able to achieve infinity focus, because of the flange-focal-distance. Here is a follow-up-read (or 'duplicate'): How will ...


0

As pointed by StephenG, you cannot always in a single shot focus on multiple different points, especially if they are at significantly different distances from the camera. You can adjust depth of field (with the associated drawbacks to maintain exposure), but this has its limits. What you can do, however, is take multiple pictures of the same scene, with ...


2

You cannot choose multiple points to have in focus at the same time in a shot. You can let the camera choose which one of several points it will use as a focus point in the shot, but the camera will not make any attempt to get all the points in focus - just one. You have limited control over how much of a scene around a selected single focus point will be ...


1

I'm going to take an optimistic stab and say that what I see in your picture doesn't look entirely like a typical fungal growth to me. They aren't usually so 'spotty', often appearing as a small number of distinctly 'spidery' blooms. Anyhow, that's beside the point - your lens needs a clean. If you're going to do this yourself, the first question you need ...


2

That certainly does look like some sort of mold or fungus. It may be affecting the image quality, but if you can prevent it from spreading you may be able to use it indefinitely. more: why does fungus form in lenses and how to get rid of it


1

All I know is that Nikons seem to be very sensitive when it comes to memory cards.My D810 won't accept anything other than an at least a "6" rated full size SD card. It won't accept micro sd's in a converter no matter what!


1

Is there a sensor in there that I may have damaged and this is giving the false reading? There is a contact switch in the SD card socket that detects the presence of a seated card. This switch is part of the SD card socket assembly. It is possible that some of the debris plastic has become lodged behind the switch, preventing the switch from moving when ...


0

Which focus mode have you selected in camera settings? The in-camera settings for focus modes also allow you to turn off autofocus without changing the focus button on lens. Check to see if you accidentally set this to manual.



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