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by Jakub

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1

You don't need anything beyond a lens, body, and a memory card/film. If you are looking to buy more things, look beyond equipment and invest in learning the craft. Books, in person training, and 1 on 1 sessions with more experienced photographers are well worth the price.


1

This is a fairly nice camera with a lot of controls designed to allow for the customization of the camera and how it operates, so there are quite a few things that could be going on. So one thing to do would be to perform a reset. With the camera on, find the two green dots in the "Qual" and "+/-" buttons on the top of the camera, hold those two buttons ...


0

3 ideas actually. 1) Put the camera on the program mode. You probably have it on manual mode. 2) Read the manual. 3) Learn how to use a DSLR camera. There are a lot of information on this site... or the internet.


0

My short but sweet answer? You need a body, battery, and lens. The rest is all up to you, your feet, your creativity and determination. Photography is a fantastic creative outlet. It is about you and how you can convey your view of the world through photography. Cameras and lenses are only a tool. The best advice I received when starting out was to buy the ...


0

As mentioned you will need a memory card and thats about it. It is worth it to make sure that your body only comes with a battery (It should but if its used or a strange deal there is always a chance it may not). For a DSLR all you really need is the body, a lens, a battery and a memory card. Yes that pairing is great. I have the D3300 (a great camera). ...


1

If you consider buying a tripod as many have suggested here, then you should also consider buying a wireless remote control for your camera. The tripod is used to eliminate camera movement to allow for long exposure shots or to allow images to be aligned more accurately for doing image processing involving multiple images (e.g. making HDR pictures or doing ...


3

What you'll need depends on what/how you plan to shoot, so waiting until you've had the camera for a while before thinking about buying more stuff for it is probably worth trying. But the things every digital shooter wants in addition to a body/lens or kit to get started is a relatively short list: a computer of some kind. Because, otherwise, how are you ...


2

It's almost certainly a co-incidence. Adaptability of foreign lenses wasn't a big thing back then in the SLR world (it was more common with medium format cameras). The simple reason for this was that camera bodies were much cheaper as they were essentially just light tight boxes with a shutter, mirror and viewfinder (you might get electronic metering or an ...


2

What you'll need will depend on what you want to shoot. For portraits, you're gonna need ways to control the light. Just about everything you'll need to get started on lighting can be found on Strobist. Landscapes can be improved with a good tripod. Get one that's good and stable because you don't want it falling down and breaking your camera. You'll also ...


6

If you read Canon's public statements at the time the EOS system/EF mount was introduced in the late 1980's, they spoke of the longer 44mm registration distance and larger diameter flange of the EF mount, when compared to their existing FD mount that had a registration distance of 42mm, as leaving room for future capabilities. If they had been concerned with ...


6

You will need a memory card — and to just get started, that's basically it. Sometimes a memory card is included in a camera store bundle, but such bundles are usually a bad deal (see Does it make sense getting any of these "extra" lens packages?). As far as I know, a memory card is never included with an interchangeable lens camera or official ...


4

The single best thing you can get after a body, lens and cards is a nice bag. The best camera in the world is no use to anyone on a shelf at home. Steer clear of any that come free with the camera, they're universally ugly and poorly made. Go to some shops and have a play with what's there. Bags are quite a personal item, but you're looking for something ...


1

Here are some suggestions (with sample price from Amazon; look to B&H Photo, as well). You certainly will need memory card(s), and probably a spare battery or two. You also should get a case or protective bag, if you do not have one. A tripod is useful for close-ups, night photography and studio work. There are many types, from inexpensive ones that ...


0

I believe this link has a potential workaround to my question - http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/42137181. The answer is : Set your shooting mode to Manual Set ISO sensitivity control to AUTO (in shooting menu), set your minimum shutter speed. Note a shortcut for toggling Auto ISO is to hold the ISO button down and then turn the front control dial ...


0

There is nothing on the right side of the body that's assignable to change the ISO directly. The closest you can get on a D300 is what you're doing. Newer bodies like the D750 allow assignment of the movie record button to set the ISO value when the camera is not in a mode that shoots video.


2

No, not directly. The Air Remote triggers have no way to attach to a flash foot (i.e., there are no hotshoe receiver units in the system). On the Canon side of the fence, there are folks who are sandwiching TTL radio triggers (YN-622, Pixel King, etc.) between the camera hotshoe and the Air Remote, and achieving TTL/HSS with speedlights that way, but with ...


3

One solution for this is to use a hood. It's basically a black box that you place on your display. You look into it through a little eye piece that often also magnifies. Take a look at what's available at B&H for example. As you can see, making the image brighter is not a good solution. It will eat up more battery while still being unable to compete ...


1

This prescription is for -1.25 diopters (under "sphere"), plus some astigmatism ("cylinder" and "axis"). You won't find an off-the-shelf corrective piece to deal with astigmatism — usually we just ignore that. The add-on corrective eyepiece is designed so the nominal number is the result when used in combination with the existing adjustment in its neutral ...


1

Agreed - my prescription is aprox -2, and the -2 eyepiece works for me.


1

Rather than transferring mechanical motion from the camera body to the lens via a mechanical linkage (what Nikon calls a regular diaphragm), in order to control the size of the aperture diaphragm an electromagnetic diaphragm uses a small motor inside the lens to move the diaphragm based on electrical communication between the camera and lens. There are a ...


1

The Nikon US page says the WR-R10/T10 are compatible with both cameras: http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Remote-Transmitters/WR-R10-Wireless-Remote-Controller-%28transceiver%29.html You need both devices, since the T10 transmits and the R10 receives. (The UK page isn't clear about it, but shows the same lineup of cameras in the "Related ...


0

You should see if the lightmeter in your camera is in the middle when you focus. Sometimes ignorance to a little reading of lightmeter makes a photo overexposed.


1

Probably the fastest and easiest way to cover the bases would be to do automatic exposure bracketing. But if you want to be precise, I'd say either use an external light meter, or get really really good/fast with the Sunny 16 rule, and learning to use your histogram to judge exposure. The Sunny 16 rule is a good way to approximate for exposure. In clear, ...


9

There is no way to change the cameras ISO when you are on the preset Auto mode. This is typical of all cameras. This is because by being in Auto you are telling the camera that you want it to control all the settings. Hence the greyed out ISO control. You can try changing the camera mode to P (Program) which is still an auto mode; but it gives you slightly ...


0

I had this problem in Low light with the AF Assist Light still coming on. What I found was that using the Live View is completely different to focusing while keeping Live view off. I just stopped using Live view and the problem was immediately solved. Of course the AF Assiste light was working in my case for both scenarios.


1

The high pitched squeak you are hearing, is most likely coming from the AF motors in the Lens. Nikon budget and kit lenses have been known for this issue for many years. From what I know, very rarely do these squeaks actually affect the AF performance and in the over whelming majority of cases, people have lived with these squeaks for years and just become ...


1

The eye lens (ocular) of the viewfinder frequently gets smudged by handling the camera or even from eyelashes. Cleaning the ocular lens is easy, as you've already done at least the outside (just use lens tissue, possibly with a drop of lens-cleaning fluid on the tissue, not on the lens itself). If the ocular unscrews, you might clean the inner surface, ...


2

Impossible, I'm afraid. Video is just so much of a fundamental change that there's no way a manufacturer, or anyone else, could add it to a camera by a firmware update or similar even if they wanted to.


1

I agree, if you haven't pushed your gear to the max to get the best performance, you don't know what part of your kit to improve. Once you have some skills in photography, learn the work arounds, and know how to maximize your gear. You'll know precisely what piece of kit you need to get. I shoot 4K video, time lapse, and panoramas, on a Lumix LX100 and ...


1

Lens Manufacturers such as Sigma and Tamron make the same lens for various different camera manufacturers, however, each lens mount is different and is dedicated exclusively to that camera manufacturer. In other words, if you wish to purchase a Sigma 18-200mm Lens for a Canon, then you need to buy a Sigma Lens with a Canon Mount I.E- EF or EF-S Fit. The ...


0

From the sound of it you should honestly just invest in a nice point and shoot. If you buy a DSLR for the trip you're going to want a zoom that's 200mm or so which can get pricey. And unless you know what you're doing with the camera and can quickly adjust ISO, Shutter, f. stop, etc... you're going to be shooting it in auto mode anyway which would ...


1

I am not sure your question can be answered - it is a very subjective one, and what is worthy for you may well not be for someone else. However, I have (over the last two years) bought a D300S and a second one as a backup camera. For me this camera has proved to be perfect - I mainly do landscapes. Although the size of images (at 12-15Mb) might be viewed ...


0

Why not just load your photos (which I do daily) onto your computer and when you "select all" you can rename your photos in a zip. It doesn't take but a few tries to get that right. If you see a set of photos you want to put in its own group for a certain day, then "highlite" just those photos by pressing control then enter then rename to your discretion ...


0

If you're ok with Dropbox, Using the automatic import function will rename all of your files to the datetime taken. My process is: 1) Plug SD card into computer (in my case it's an iMac) 2) Let dropbox do the automatic import 3) Have hazel automatically file into my Pictures folder with the structure Year/Month/Day Taken 4) In Lightroom, I use the ...


3

There's no way to assign a date-based filename on-camera. However, there are quite a few pieces of software that will help do just this when ingesting photos from the memory card to your computer, giving you the ability to define your preferred file name, folder structure, and assorted metadata, too, such as Adobe Lightroom and Camera Bits Photo Mechanic.


0

Nikon assigns sequential filenames to the pictures, but it does record the date, which will show up in the date column on your PC. I usually have a separate folder on the PC for each day I shoot. So, as long as you have correctly set the date and time on your camera, you should be good.


1

Couple of other things to check: Are both of the YN-605Ns in the same 603/602 mode? Is the YN-568EX out of all slave modes? [slave modes tell the flash to only listen to the sensor panel and to ignore the foot--the radio triggers are on the foot]. Without the camera or flash, does using the test button on the transmitter 605N fire the receiver 605N? (check ...


4

No. There are several problems here. This lens looks a lot like the Senko 50mm f/0.95, i.e., it is a C-mount lens for 1" format video. This lens vignettes even on micro four-thirds (2x crop). There's no way the image circle will cover an APS-C or full-frame camera, and the registration distance is much much smaller than that of Nikon F. In order to get the ...


3

No, because the register (distance from the mounting flange of the lens to the sensor plane) is quite short.


1

This screen also known as a "ground glass screen" (though it's not always made of glass) has a very fine etched pattern on one side of it to facilitate the way it scatters light. Cleaning the side of it with this surface is not practical as it's likely to both deposit small particles into this etched surface and possibly damage the etched surface (think ...


0

You can use Pentax screwmount (M42 Mount) lenses on a Nikon D60 (F-Mount) by using an adapter. An example of such an adapter is this one available from B&H Photo: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/995104-REG/fotodiox_m42_nk_pg_pro_nikon_f_mount_lens.html


2

To quote from the 572D manual: Automatic Focusing (for Nikon/Minolta/Pentax AF SLR) When the camera is on the autofocus mode, the lens focuses automatically. Digging a little further, this thread confirms my suspicion that the Tamron lens doesn't have a built in focusing motor, but instead uses the screw drive motor which exists on higher-end ...


0

I also have the 3100 and have recently had the same problem. If you take off the lens and look at the edge of the screen, you'll see a rectangular wire that holds it in. Just push it free from the clip it's tucked under at the front and the screen will fall right out. Be careful: the focusing screen scratches really easily and then your view will always look ...


1

HSR isn't HSS. To quote from the PocketWizard PlusIII's website: HIGH SPEED RECEIVE Normally, the Plus III is capable of triggering lights or cameras at a sustained rate of up to 12 frames per second (FPS), a standard for PocketWizard radios. Set the Plus III to High Speed Receive Mode (HSR) and trigger at rates up to 14.5 FPS, beyond the ...


1

Most Nikons that I have taken apart use the flip-up type ribbon connectors, you have to flip up the top edge, insert ribbon and flip down. If you tried just pushing it in flat its unlikely to have gone in far enough. This is a very common type of connector on electronics (Laptops, cameras etc)



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