Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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-1

Long exposures are one area where electronic sensors can't do what film did. Electronic sensors accumulate noise over time, in addition to any signals due to light hitting the sensor. This is why the designers of such cameras limit the maximum exposure time so something around 30 seconds. If you could hold the shutter open, and have the sensor therefore ...


3

Put it in Manual (M) mode and roll the wheel until it shows 'Bulb' on the display. One shutter button press opens the shutter, another closes. You don't need a remote, but it helps to prevent camera shake to a great extent. P.S. The manual is your friend.


2

I assume you mean you want the equivalent focal length as a 70-300mm lens on a DSLR body? If so, the J1 has a crop factor of 2.7x and that means you want something like the Nikkor 30-110mm lens, which they make for the Nikon 1 series. If you mean an actual 70-300mm lens, they also make a Nikon 1 series 70-300mm Or you can buy the FT1 Adapter, which will ...


1

There's no benefit in terms of image quality to the larger sensor of the 610 if you are going to use DX lenses in crop mode (except possibly in noise, not sure exactly how the D610 compares to the D3200). Having said that there's no real loss either when resizing images for the web - 10 megapixels is plenty. You could probably get away with the 35 f/1.8 in ...


5

The FX lenses work fine, so I wonder if there is any point buying a DX Lens? Yes there are several points. Because the image circle for a DX is smaller there exist DX lenses which doesn't have counterparts in FX lineup. Just two examples: the famous Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM (no Full Frame zoom with f/1.8 exist) the new super-super-zoom Tamron ...


0

AJ Henderson> You could always send the lens in for a cleaning, but there is no guarantee that would fix it I'd vote for a visit to a repair shop, a "CLA" might be the right choice, or not.


1

The problem is in the Thumbnail — that's what really shows in the camera. If you check the jpg files created by the camera and generated by most programs, they have thumbnails with offsets and completely different sizes. I think the camera looks for a marker for specific offset which the camera and other programs, including VIEWNX2, are able to generate. ...


0

"Best" depends on what you're looking for in post-processing software, but a few of the more popular open source packages you could look at using would be: The GIMP with dcraw. The GIMP is the open-source alternative to Photoshop, and has a very deep and sophisticated feature set, with quite a bit more control than you could find in Picasa. Tutorials are ...


0

GIMP + dcraw plugin. Simple to use and have everything you need. Here is GIMP and here is dcraw.


0

RawTherapee is quite good and "feature packed" and works on multiple platforms.One of its strengths has always been its excellent highlight recovery. In addition, it added last year two demosaicing algorithms optimized for noisy images. I tested them and they a markedly superior to anything else out there.


0

If you are speaking of a micro four-thirds Olympus m.Zuiko or four-thirds or e.Zuiko lens, then no, you cannot use them. Not only is the registration distance (the distance from the sensor to the lens mount) much smaller than Nikon F mount (which means you could not achieve focus at infinity with the lens without an adapter with a glass element to act as a ...


0

Unfortunately, no. I'm going to assume that the lens you are interested in is a current Micro 4/3rds Olympus lens, but this is true for vintage "OM" lenses as well. The Olympus cameras have a shorter flange distance — basically, the lenses mount closer to the camera, which is the reverse of the situation where an adapter can work. (It might be theoretically ...


2

Nikon G Lenses use a mechanical aperture control, so I would guess that it should be possible modify one to add a aperture ring. Would it be practical? No. Either go for a newer camera or an older lens model.


0

If @Evan Oswald's answer (silica gels or rice to dry it out without opening) does not help, it might be enough to open it up, and let it dry that way. You can also replace some parts. You loose any warranty, if you still have any. Also Nikon won't repair it for your afterwards even for money. I'd decide whether the camera is worthless to you right now. If ...


3

I see no problem in either of these images. They both appear correct. Lenses are not 100% sharp to begin with and on cheaper lenses it is not atypical for the resolution of the camera to outpace the resolution of the lens, particularly on entry level and kit lenses like the two you are using. This is even further compounded by using high aperture on a ...



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