Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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New answers tagged

2

I solved it. In movie settings, you have to manual movie setting off in order to be able to change the aperture in live view.


5

We can't change f-stops in nikon d3200 in live view mode because when the mirror is lifted up the aperture-setting lever stops working. It works fine in viewfinder mode since the mirror is down. Just to clarify your doubt please switch to different lens and try changing f-stops in live view.


-1

Late answer to this question, but seeing as other "Nikon aperture won't change in Live View" questions are pointing here, this is the appropriate place for this information. This discussion at nikonhacker.com explains how pre-D7000 consumer Nikon DSLRs couple the aperture mechanism to the mirror. Essentially, the mirror-up actuation triggers the action to ...


3

There are special situations where MF will be more reliable, but most of the time AF is better: Lenses that are designed for AF are usually difficult to focus manually with great precision. The internal focusing mechanism is designed for AF speed, which means that small movement of the focusing ring makes relatively large difference in the focus plane. The ...


0

It is most definitely the monitor brightness. at first I worked with shutter shutter speed, ISO and brightness in general, but the images would all come out drastically different once uploaded onto my computer. What I ended up doing was simple. I put my computer (iMac) and my camera (D3200) side by side. I took some photos, uploaded them to my computer (...


2

Strictly, to get "crisp results" they are both exactly equal and capable. Autofocus and manual focus both do the same thing -- bring the image into focus -- and by moving the glass they both do this the same way. It's really about the user, the camera, the conditions. Try using manual focus by simply racking back and forth and you'll get nowhere. Try using ...


2

Digital camera viewfinders don't have the special focusing aids film cameras had to make manual focusing easy. 50mm is a bit long to try to focus manually with a flat glass viewfinder on a crop sensor camera that lacks DoF preview, especially if you're buying a prime with the intention of using large apertures (which reduce depth of field even further). If ...


0

Based on my practice, when I shoot with my 50mm I use more often the auto-focus than when shooting with other lens. That is why I think that AF-S is more suitable. I also have d3300 and use the AF-S 50m and the results are awesome. The AF-S is no more then 80-100 $ more expensive. I think that this is not so much for a good lens. Both, AF and AF-S are ...


2

There's no definitive answer to this. It depends on what your subject is and what the situation allows. If you're shooting still life or landscape from a tripod, you can switch to Live View, zoom in and use manual focus. If you're shooting sports or live music, there will be a lot of movement involved, so it won't be easy without continuous focus (AF-C).


2

The thing to consider is your own skill level really. If you can precisely tune the focus without the use of auto-focus then you can probably get away with using it. Otherwise, I would say just stick with your kit lens until you can afford the af-s lens.


1

Your 18-55mm Nikon kit lens has 52mm threads (at least the current version of the Nikon 18-55mm kit lens does). This should be indicated on the front of the lens by a mark that looks something like this: Ø52 Your 55-250mm lens probably also has 52mm threads. This should be indicated by a mark on the front of the lens that looks like: Ø52. I have found some ...


1

First, prefer using a lens hood than a UV filter. You should not need a filter unless in the presence of salt water splashing, flying sand or similar. Second, a lens hood must match the lens, not just to account for its size but also its optical design. An 18-55mm and a 55-200mm may have the same diameter for the hood-mounting bayonet but a hood for the 55-...


4

Everything you need to know you can find at Nikon's site for each of those lenses. AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Filter size: 52mm (same for lens cap) Hood: HB-69 Bayonet Lens Hood AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II Filter size: 52mm (same for lens cap) Hood: HB-37 Bayonet Lens Hood


1

Your AF-S 18-105 VR lens has what is known as internal focusing. That means that all of the movement when the lens focuses is on the inside of the lens and nothing on the outside of the lens moves when the lens autofocuses. Your 18-55mm lens does not have an internal focus design and the front element and front barrel of the lens do move when the focus is ...


2

It will depend a lot on the quality of the adapter you get, but I'd say that it would probably work well enough that if it gives you a significant cost-savings, and you don't mind the possible image quality vagaries of adapting, it's worth trying. As you say, there's no electronic communication to be lost, anyway, and you were already set to manually focus, ...


1

No, it is not. The DC designation on Sigma lenses means it's a DX lens. Their DG designation indicates an FX lens. Nearly all zoom lenses that start with 16-18mm at the wide end are crop lenses. Full frame walkaround zooms more typically start at 24mm or 28mm. The Sigma 28-300 DG lens is probably what you're looking for.


0

I had the same problem with my 70mm-200mm f2.8 Tamron VC, where it stopped auto focusing and had it repaired through warranty. Not sure why this happen, I rarely use the lens, it's never be abused and still looks new. The repair report stated that the pc board, VC reset and a general cleaning. Works as expected now but not sure if and when it will stop ...


1

There is no way to see a Nikon's serial number on screen. However, the serial number is embedded in the EXIF data of photos taken by their DSLR, mirrorless, and bridge cameras (I'm not sure if the serial number is also in their compact cameras). You can extract this EXIF field (either Serial Number or Camera Serial Number) using the excellent exiftool ...


0

Check your LCD brightness. LCD screens include a polarization filter and may cause issues like this if the display is not bright enough (or if you are using a secondary polarizer like sunglasses or a filter on a camera.)


0

After bumping my d610 around on the streets of Paris I've got my Nikkor 28-300 stuck just behind the 70mm mark. I tried forcing it to no avail. I was resigned to shoot the rest of my trip with a lens limited to one quarter of its maximum focal length. Here is what fixed my issue. I detached the lens from the camera body, I turn the zoom ring up to the ...


2

You can set Exposure Compensation directly on the speedlight. Second button from the left. Note that any EC set on camera is in addition to any EC set on the speedlight. Camera +1, speedlight -1 result is 0 EC.


2

Try holding the unmounted lens and moving the aperture linkage while looking through the lens. If it is a little stiff at first and then moves freely after a couple of cycles from one end of the lever's movement to the other then that's probably all you need to do. Next time be sure the lens is in dry air and at ambient temperature before storing it away ...


1

The essence of your problem is the high differential in brightness between the subject and the background. And you are forcing yourself to use a tight aperture to get the depth of field you want. Using a higher focal length lens and backing farther away from the subject will help with depth of field, but I know of only three solutions to the light ...


2

Do you want the short answer or the long one? Some viable options or the best one? The long one. I am worried here. There are toooooo many basic points on the question. So I am preparing a check list of points you must further investigate. I will just write a basic tip on each point. No bokeh: What aperture gives bokeh and which not? Do not use a wide ...


0

You could try positioning the model near to the entrance of the tunnel in the sunlight and then use a long lens to fore-shorten the tunnel so the far end looks large behind them. Also, consider what other light sources do you have available. Car headlights?


6

(Some people might hang me for this but) You could take two shots and photoshop/merge them together afterwards. To do this you would have to take two shots from the exact same spot, maybe use a tripod. Take the first shot with the right settings to get your desired exposure for the outisde bit of the tunnel. For the second shot with the model use either ...


1

If you don't want bokeh, the first step is to find the aperture your lens produces sharp results for the model and the landscape in the distance. Something between 8 and 11 might be OK. Depending on the light situation inside the tunnel you probably won't need full power output of your flash or none at all. This is something that really depends on the ...


0

If you have too wide a range of EVs, and if you didn't have a set of flashes, I suggest you: Make an HDR at 7 fps (or more) by using a tripod with a constant aperture value by using the bracketing option.Then you will be able to remove ghosts by using "photomatix pro" or another software. With a tripod also, take a separate picture of the model in the ...


0

Check to see if your Nikon uses the same flash metering algorithm as Canon - when set tot aperture-priority but with the flash on, the camera will sett he aperture & shutter speed to correctly expose the background (the outside of the tunnel in your case, but it might get confused if too much of the dark tunnel fills the scene) and uses the flash to ...


6

Sounds like you want the outside of the tunnel to be properly exposed and not blown out. Meter for that and with your camera set to full manual mode use the settings suggested by the light meter. Take some test shots to fine tune the exposure. You are limited with an on camera flash but try adjusting the power of the flash with the flash compensation ...



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