Red and Blue

by Gordon

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0

When you took the photo with a 300mm length, it got cropped on a crop sensor. You didn't actually get a 450mm photo, but still a 300mm cropped photo. With full frame, it will still take the same photo but without any cropping. If you crop it in photoshop then you will get the exact same photo as your crop camera... you are basically not missing out on any ...


0

To get the same reach as the long end of your 70-300mm lens on an APS-C body, you need a lens with a focal length of 450mm on the D750. To get any Nikon lens with that kind of focal length at f/5.6 or wider requires a substantial expenditure compared to what you paid for the 70-300. The Nikon 500mm f/4 sells for about $7,900 new. The 400mm f/2.8 runs a ...


0

To get the equivalent FoV ("reach") on full frame that a 70-300 has on 1.5 crop would require a (70-300)*1.5 = 105-450mm lens. This will probably be at least twice as expensive as a 70-300, and will definitely be larger and more difficult to handle. Make sure you're ok with the possibility of relearning technique or adding stabilization--and possibly ...


2

I'll assume that you are talking about very low light scenes with exposure times of typically say 5 seconds plus. If not, please advise. If that is a Vibration Correction (VC) lens the VC feature should be turned OFF when on a tripod. The VC feature tries to "correct" vibration that ideally is not there and makes extra vibration! Do not touch the camera ...


1

I presume by "night photography" that you mean starts etc.? It's important to set your camera focus manually and to infinity ∞ to take pictures of the night sky. Another important matter is that if you was to take the picture on a long exposure using the shutter button that you would move the camera slightly. If you're not already doing so, you should use a ...


0

The main difference will come when you buy lenses for the 5D, which is a full frame camera, and that is really gonna cost you much more than D3200 lenses. Apart from this there are things like: no built in flash no mass storage device USB mode no GPS and many more features which you may be more accustomed to. So I would suggest not to go for 5D ...


0

Camera markings are merely nominal numbers for us dumb humans. The concept of fstops being 2x the previous requires that shutter speeds simply must be 1,2,4,8,16,32 seconds. Or 1/ those same values. In the same way, what we call f/11 is actually f/11.31. The camera knows this, and does the right thing. But this means that to use the marked 30 seconds ...


0

The question here is really "Are there third-party lenses which will work on the Nikon D3300?", which is only answered by the other "possible duplicate" question in passing, because it starts from the assumption of incompatible mount, when actually third-party manufacturers do produce Nikon-mount lenses — although Sony and Canon do not. (Sigma is the only ...


0

Do the crop math backwards. :) You went from a 1.5x crop sensor to a 1x crop sensor, so if you multiply the focal lengths for crop by 1.5, you'll get the equivalent FoV full-frame focal lengths. 18 x 1.5 = 27 105 x 1.5 = 157.5 So any lens that covers 27-157.5 (or an equivalent) will be able to fulfill pretty much the same purpose. So, in the current ...


2

I've encountered the same issue with my D7000. To get more than 100 I have to intervene just before it hits the 100 mark. When doing star trails I set the mode to Continuous Low and lock the shutter button down with the corded remote. Just before 50 minutes are up I come back to the camera and release the shutter button. When the 30 second exposure is ...


0

The TTL groups are metered individually by the commander. The commander sets their power levels so that all groups are equal at the subject (regardless of their distances or their modifiers, etc). Normally one light is group A and one light is group B (to meter them individually). But both equal is flat light, and for best lighting results, we should set ...


0

OP: There is more to how the camera works than you described. The exposure automation (for example, aperture preferred mode lets metering set the shutter speed and the Auto ISO value) is based on ambient (any metered camera settings are NOT about flash). NONE of this about flash. The TTL flash has to work into whatever ISO and aperture it discovers ...


3

I owned the "push-pull" 80-200, updated that to the 80-200 ED, then eventually purchased a 70-200 off a friend who was downsizing to mirrorless. So I've had all three. The 80-200 has a few disadvantages to the 70-200 VR, but it is a perfectly fine lens to use on a modern camera. It lacks some modern features like VR and AF-S, so maybe a little outdated, ...


2

You are using TTL, which means all flashes have to communicate with the camera and there has to be a preflash to determine the flash output. The process is something like this: preflash: let every flash fire at a certain power level meter the exposure during preflash and calculate if they should have more or les power during the actual exposure actual ...


0

If the internal flash is used as a Commander to control remote TTL flash(es), it HAS TO flash commands to the remote before the shutter opens. It is the Commander, it must Command (by flashing). It flashes commands (addressed to each enabled group), which are a request for a TTL preflash from each group. The remote (or remotes) answer in turn with a ...


2

Maybe. This lens is made for Canon, Pentax, Sigma, Sony/Minolta, and Nikon mounts. You would need the Nikon version — F-mount. However, do also note that it won't autofocus on your camera, as the D5100 does not have the focus motor necessary to drive it.


0

No, the transmission of zoom information is not done, because it is pointless. As Birfl said, the flashes are likely at a very different distance than the lens, and any lens zoom value would be totally meaningless to the flash (if it is not on the hot shoe). Main flash up close (5 feet), camera maybe 8 feet for perspective, and fill light behind the camera ...


3

No. With CLS, this control is not possible (Canon's wireless system for flash can zoom flashes remotely--however, Canon's wireless flash can't do 2nd curtain sync while Nikon's can). However, if you use the Yongnuo YN-622N triggers with a YN-622N-TX transmitter, or Phottix Odins, you will have remote zoom control over your flashes, but it may only be by ...


4

A flash on the camera's hot shoe is in a known location relative to the film plane. From that, it's easy to calculate where to place the zoom head so the light covers the area the camera actually sees. The extra energy spent lighting the area seen by a 24mm lens when the actual focal length is 85mm would simply be wasted, and that saps the batteries and ...


1

It seems like newer Tamrons have problems with the autofocus motor. My 70-200/f2.8 VC had the same symptoms and after a while it stopped focusing but was repaired through warranty. I hear similar stories about the new 24-70/f2.8 VC as well. First of all go back to your camera store and let them check it out and show you how it works. If there's a problem ...


1

Flash (manual or TTL) exposure varies with subject distance (and ISO and aperture too, but also subject distance). Twice the distance is exposure two stops down. So as you walk around the room shooting pictures, or you are chasing kids running around, then many cases are surely DIFFERENT situations, different distances, etc. With manual flash, you have to ...


2

In a wedding, with on-camera flash, bouncing off the ceiling, walking around taking pics of people dancing, etc. Does a TTL flash have advantages, and if so, what? The main advantage is speed. Given that event shooting is mostly about anticipating moments at the event, and the nature of events being that you usually only get one chance at capturing ...


1

Which flash helps? and in what areas does it help? I'm sure you're familiar with the difference between automatic exposure modes (e.g. Program) and manual mode on your camera. The difference between TTL and manual flash is similar. With TTL, the camera measures the exposure from the flash and the scene and adjusts the flash power to create a reasonable ...


1

At a large distance, a hot-shoe mounted flash won't help. To prevent the built-in flash to pop up, you have to select an apropriate program on your camera, either a "no-flash" scene mode or one of the advanced modes, consult your manual for details. Whether you need a 200mm or 300mm lens depends, of course, on the actual distance and the scene you like to ...


0

I have a D610 and a NEX 5R, so I'm in a similar situation. Just buy the cheapest adapter that has mechanical aperture control for G lenses. Forget about autofocus; even if you find the most expensive adapter that allows autofocus, it would not be very good. The beauty of Sony E bodies is the full-time LiveView AND the really nicely implemented focus ...


1

Get a set of cheap screw Nikon G extension tubes from eBay. The part with the lens mount can be unscrewed from the rest of the tubes and mounted to the lens. This allows you to easily control the aperture, plus should provide a male filter thread that you can screw filters onto. (The set I purchased has a rather unusual 57 mm thread, and while it looks like ...


1

You can calculate what you need to do as follows. First we need to look up what the pixel size r is for your camera sensor. For your camera we can find here that r = 3.8*10^(-6) m. Then the so-called "hyperfocal distance" H is given in terms of the focal length f and F-number F as: H = f^2/(F r) The hyperfocal distance is defined as the minimum distance ...


2

Depending on what the quality control is like for new lenses - most likely a few specimens are pulled off the line and tested - it's possible that refurbished lenses can generally be be more reliable than new, in that they get more fully bench tested compared to new lenses that go out the door. I would think a refurb would be less likely to have issues with ...


5

Generally (I can't speak for Nikon) refurbished equipment is used\broken\defective equipment that has been returned to a manufacturer. The manufacturer will then refit, clean, and repackage the item to factory specifications (as if it were new) and then sell it at a discounted price. Refurbished items generally have a shorter warranty, but since they ...


0

For me this is a problem with SD card. Get new one and try. You can try also to format this card but in this case you will loose all the photos on it And do you keep all the photos on card? The wise workflow is to shoot a session, then when go home download all the images and format the card.


1

The driven part of the AF coupling in the lens should be easy to turn for the entire travel. Most of the mechanical parts that make the AF happen are toward the front of the lens, so removing the lens mount and poking around isn't likely to net you anything. In your situation, I'd send it in if you can't get a refund. $200 for the lens plus $375 for Nikon ...


0

Are you sure you don't have the focus limiter switched on? It signals the lens that you want to focus either close, or at a distance, and prevents the lens from "hunting". If you turn off the focus limiter, the lens should focus from it's nearest point out to infinity. If you switch to manual focus, does it get sticky as you get to the 10m mark?


4

Your confusion is understandable. The lenses are very similar indeed, as noted in comparison / review by Thom Hogan. On Nikkor lenses, "IF" is an acronym for internal focusing - so that using polarizing filters should be easier with the IF-ED lens. But the most significant (and costly) difference is actually considered to be VR, standing for Vibration ...


1

They are not the same lens. The older ED II has no VR (Vibration Reduction). The newer 18-55 VR II is so new a lot of the well know and well respected online reviewers haven't tested it yet, so it is hard to compare optical quality between the two. I would be very surprised, though, if the newer lens wasn't more than marginally better than the older one. And ...


1

You could, in a REALLY amateur method pick up black paperboard and precisely cut out a circle in the center to obtain a smaller aperture, but of course this is a really rough way and no high quality at all can be expected. The cut paperboard, if it is thin enough and the outer circle is cutt precisely, can be placed inside the bottom of the lens between the ...


3

Reset your settings as described in the manual on page 224 menu button -> shooting menu: "yes" for "Reset Shooting Menu" Additionally, check your manual focus settings as found on page 83 of the same manual.


3

That doesn't seem normal, no. Because the f/number relates to exposure at any given point (not total sensor size), the crop factor shouldn't matter. Since you had a one-stop lower ISO, one would expect the other camera to be correct at half the shutter speed, not several times longer. Were you both framing a roughly identical scene? Does the same thing ...


1

See also: What should I look for when shopping for my first DSLR? Here are the questions I think you need to ask yourself before buying any new camera. What's my budget? The amount of money you can spend on camera gear will probably be the biggest limitation on getting any specific camera. It will sway your decision on whether or not you would prefer ...


1

For the most part, aside from the added instability and possible added variance in adapter thickness when stacking adapters, you're correct, but there are exceptions. Not all the Samyang lenses for mft are identical to their dSLR counterparts. Samyang does make two lenses that were specifically designed for mirrorless mounts and do not work on dSLRs, and ...


0

I finally managed to an article related to my questions. Apparently what was improved in the newer version was: Zoom lock button SIC – Super Integrated Coating. Source


0

I have the mc-dc2 and it works just fine with my d-750 !!


1

Nikon USA lists the MC-DC2 release cable as compatible with the D750. Sellers that don't include the D750 in the list of cameras that are compatible with the D750 probably created the listing before the D750 was introduced. An example: B&H doesn't include the D750 in the list of compatible cameras at the product information page. But if you click on the ...


0

When you say it looks like there is no lens attached, the only thing that comes to mind is the battery being flat. Given it's a new camera, try charging up the battery. With a dead battery you see almost nothing through the viewfinder. Very dark and very blurry (not just out of focus). With the battery charged it might look blurry if the lens wasn't ...


2

This is to be expected. The mode you are using when the rear screen shows the shot is called "live view", and in this mode, the camera uses contrast-detect autofocus, which is very accurate but inherently slow. If you use manual focus or prefocus, the lag should be somewhat reduced. In "normal" SLR mode, the mirror directs part of the light to your ...



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