Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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6

The main fundamental thing to get used to is doing the crop math in the other direction with FX lenses. What you're used to seeing as 50mm with your crop body, on full frame, will look like 35mm on your crop would. Having all your glass get wider is the first disconcerting thing you think you're prepared for, that you really really aren't. Particularly when ...


4

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


4

The Nikon AF 70-300mm F4-5.6 ED D was a fair lens back in the day, but the problem you'll have now is that it's not an AF-S lens -- meaning it doesn't have an autofocus motor built in -- and will therefore be manual-focus only on the 5300.


4

The Nikon EH-5b power adapter will do this. For your camera model you would also need the EP-5B battery adpter via which to connect the EH-5b. Try typing in "nikon d750 power adapter europe" to Google. It will be the first result.


3

Yes, the 18-55mm lens will of course also do 35mm. This focal length determines the angular field of view of the lens. So the 18-55 is more versatile in that way. Because 18mm is a 2x wider view (than 35mm), which is called wide angle, and 55mm approaches a magnified or zoomed in view, of about a half again larger subject (in a smaller zoomed view than the ...


3

AF-S on D90 will not activate shutter until it is in focus. This is a good thing. AF-C will activate shutter regardless if in focus yet or not, if that's what you really want. Holding half press a second first is a good plan. The D90 has menu D10 that might be on, which adds about a one second delay after mirror rise, but before shutter activates.


3

Really you are making two transitions here. From a D3200 you need to accustomed to a pro body with dual control-dials, more direct controls and a 100% coverage viewfinder. This would happen if you are to move to a D500 or D7200 instead too, even though these are APS-C cameras. While you can probably ignore the extra buttons ;) it is best to get accustomed ...


3

This answer actually applies to any camera. It's not immediate, but is guaranteed to be effective. Pick up camera. Create a series of photographs you think might work. Later, review those photographs and decide which you think did work best. Thr next day or week, go back to step 1. Repeat 1-3 until you feel comfortable. Over time, look again at your ...


2

With the 70-300mm, I guess I could take pictures of the moon or any other close up objects 300mm doesn't really get you close enough for the moon. You could use a teleconverter, but you'd either have to get a third party one or make warranty-breaking modifications to a Nikon one. However, you can get some nice wildlife pictures at 300mm, particularly ...


2

The camera simply needed its batteries changed. I also cleared out a bit of blue battery gunk from a previous battery leak. The autofocus seemed much "snappier" when I put changed the batteries, but the shutter still did not fire. This gave me enough confidence that I put a cheap film in and sure enough it is working perfectly (as far as I can tell before ...


1

Auto-focus needs some light and a good amount of contrast. If you are missing either it will seek and cause a shutter delay.


1

It will work perfectly in my experience and I use a cheaper $30 adapter. There are a few things to remember: Generally AI can be found for less than the AI-S and the -S won't function anyways (until there's electronic adapters). The downside of course is if you do upgrade to an electronic adapter you might want the -S Aperture information will not be in ...


1

Yes it will work, but obviously as a manual only lens. There shouldn't be any notable loss in quality, however there may be some in the corners depending on the combo's precision.


1

No, you can't. To quote from v5.0 of The Other YN-622C User Guide II, page 20: The Canon YN-622C is NOT compatible with the Nikon YN-622N. The camera codes are not the same. This actually makes sense when you consider the completely different pin/contact arrangement on the hotshoe and the inevitable differences in signal protocols. The only way I ...


1

Remember that a true weather sealing is stamped with a certification grade like IP 67. Unless you have this kind of statement, the "weather sealing" remains more or less a marketing argument saying "we have added some more sealing gaskets but you still use it under the rain at your own risks", because it does not say how much it is sealed. It gives you no ...


1

I believe the answer to be simple. Nikon does not warranty their product if it is used in the rain. I have a few Nikon DSLRs and I love them. But, for rainy conditions, I purchased a Pentax K-50 touted by Pentax to be weather proof. I also have two weather resistant (WR) Pentax Lenses. Don't sell Pentax short. Look at the features. I have used the Pentax ...


1

This is a very old question but it remains relevant so I'll add my 3 cents. Lightroom's white balance presets seem to be just ballpark figures not tuned to any camera-specific properties. The best way to get Nikon/Canon/whatever-like rendition in Lightroom is described here and here. Basically: Take some photos with your camera using built-in white ...



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