Fresh Dew on a Rose

by adarsha joisa

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12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


5

You can't attach an external battery pack or use batteries with higher amperage, but you can set the power lower, either by using flash exposure compensation, if the pop-up flash is in iTTL, or by explicitly setting a lower power value if the pop-up flash is in Manual mode. Keep in mind, however, that a pop-up flash isn't all that powerful to begin with ...


5

As far as I can tell from the manual there is no way to directly control the flash power. However if you use a higher ISO then the flash power needed to obtain the same exposure will reduce by the same factor; so for example if you are shooting at ISO 200 then switching to ISO 800 will mean the flash will only use a quarter of the power. Additionally, ...


5

All Nikon lenses (including D and G series) have a mechanical lever built into the lens that is moved by the camera body. No motor. The aperture ring is typically left locked at the highest aperture setting (say f/22) and aperture controlled by the dial on the body. Here is the lever on my 50mm 1.4G: As @Blrfl said, the only difference between D and G ...


4

The default settings are so called because they are what the designers of the camera selected to be the standard settings for your camera. Short of writing your own firmware revision for the camera there is no way for you to alter a default setting and then have the camera return to that setting when you do a default reset.


3

Answering your questions directly: Nikon came out with a new version of Picture Control that has a new file extension associated to it(NP2). Some of the main benefits are: Finer adjustment of each parameter in increments of 0.25 and compatibility with the new Picture Control Flat and new parameter clarity. The D3200 is compatible with NCP, as it is about 2 ...


3

The Nikon 60mm and 105mm lenses are macro lenses. As you focus closer than a certain point, the aperture decreases. For normal distances, both lenses should remain at 2.8, but as you get close to macro distance, you'll lose "effective" aperture. There's a mathematical equation to calculate the loss of light and some more information here: ...


3

PF and DO terminologies are nominally interchangeable; Canon holds patents for Diffractive Optics lenses: http://www.cameraegg.org/new-canon-do-patents-500mm-f4-500mm-f5-6-600mm-f4-800mm-f5-6/ .. while Nikon has "Phase Fresnel" patents: http://nikonrumors.com/2015/01/06/nikons-phase-fresnel-pf-lens-explained.aspx/ I believe that their technologies are ...


3

In addition to controlling the flash power, you can also use only almost full batteries in the camera. The higher the charge in the battery, the faster the flash will recycle. So going ahead and putting in a fresh 100% charged battery when the one you are using is only discharged to, say, 75% will keep the flash cycling at a higher rate than if you wait ...


3

I got a similar error of "f/0" after putting my 55-300mm lens on my D7000. I examines the small connecting needles at the rear end of the lens. The number of these needle heads varies depending on the type of lens — a 55-300 has 8 needle heads; a 18-200mm has 10. These serve as connectors from the lens to the camera body. They spring up and down upon ...


2

Right... this question and its answers has been bothering me for a long, long time. It's actually more likely that the first linked shot ("Mallory", back-3/4-lit by a setting sun on the beach) was done in-camera with a D40 (or one of its 6 megapixel Nikon stablemates, the D100, D70 or D50) than with another DSLR. And you don't need anything special, ...


2

There is a lot going on here with many questions you have asked. The main question I believe you are asking is, can you use a macro lens for portrait photography? We already have at least two questions on this site that address that: Should I use a 100mm Macro lens as a portrait lens? Is a macro lens suitable for distant subjects - wildlife, sports, ...


2

As @philipkendall says, it may be a camera body issue. If some images are ok, while others are not, it suggests the lens (which is unchanged across pictures) is ok. It may be that either one or both of the white balance and exposure compensation settings might have been knocked. White Balance If this is set incorrectly this may explain why some of the ...


2

VR The Nikkon 18-200 has VR, the Tamron 18-200 does not. VR can give you an advantage worth two or three stops on the aperture. Nikon claim up to four stops There are some relatively cheap Nikon lenses that include VR. For example 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S VR DX NIKKOR $197 55-200mm f/4-5.6G AF-S DX Nikkor VR - $247 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX Nikkor ED ...


1

I would suggest this is a fault with the camera (as you have tried different lenses). As your D5300 is new, I would take it back to the shop I bought it from and they should repair or replace it.


1

That simply refers to the Maximum Aperture of the lens. The terms in that lens name are as follows: AF-S - Auto Focus - Silent DX - Designed for Nikon crop sensor bodies 55-300mm - Focal length range of the lens f/4.5-5.6 - Maximum aperture of the lens at min and max focal lengths G - No manual aperture control on the lens, aperture must be controlled by ...


1

Your example above presumes that there are only 5 possible variables between to two lenses which could contribute towards the price. The fact is that there are many other reasons why the price could be higher: Build Quality Lens Coatings Perceived image quality Maximum aperture Aperture blade type I won't go on, because there are just too many. I would ...


1

You have the U1 and U2 modes on the mode dial where you can set your own settings. Once you have the camera configured the way you like go into the menu and register your settings. There may be more information on page 55 of your manual.


1

When you adjust the focal length using the zoom ring, the aperture read out will change for most lenses, this is normal and expected behaviour. It happens as a result of the way the optics move mechanically inside the lens. You can tell which lenses will exhibit this behaviour as their aperture will be listed as a range of values such as the AF-S DX NIKKOR ...


1

Fotodiox is selling am "aperture control enabler" now that's designed to do this for macro reversed lenses. You could use it pointing the standard direction on a manual camera body if you got the right filter thread adapters, though it will mess up the flange-focal distance, so it's probably only useful if you're using a macro lens anyway or your image ...


1

Replacement sets are not expensive. As low as $15. I wld never use Gorilla glue in a situation like this. It is an expanding urethane adhesive and might expand through small openings (of which there are a number) into the interior of the camera. A thin layer of rubber cement on the grips and (carefully) on the body seems to work okay.


1

Exactly, if you want to shoot in " AUTO " mode then shoot in " PROGRAM" (P) mode. This is the closest you can get to auto, and you can change parameters as well. Biggest perk, you will not have to worry about the on camera flash popping up. This works for third party flashes as well as flashes designed for your camera (Nikon, Canon, etc)



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