Open

by damned truths

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

The focal length/speed is only one factor in the retail price of the lens. Other goodies like construction (metal vs. plastic), image stabilization (and other automation in general) and vintage can easily add (or remove) a zero. The two lenses in the question are very different products. The 2.8G is a newer product and lacks an aperture ring - the diaphragm ...


7

This looks very much like motion blur, caused by the camera being moved during the exposure. I seriously doubt the shutter speed was really 1/800 s. Is that just what you thought you set it to, or is it what the EXIF data says? If the latter, there is probably something wrong with your camera. Note that the blurring is more a horizontal smear than ...


6

1/90th of a second is the limit of the cameras shutter speed with out electronic assistance. On your shutter dial you should see it listed as "M90", the "M" standing for mechanical. My first course of action would be ensure that you're using a fresh battery, then check the battery connections is free from corrosion. If the problem persists, it might mean ...


6

That lens has a switch that limits focus from 5m to infinity. The other setting (full) lets you focus from 1.4 m to infinity. There is no setting to focus between 1.4m and 5m only. You cannot focus on anything closer than 1.4 meter with that lens. Manual here: http://cdn-10.nikon-cdn.com/pdf/manuals/lenses/AF/AFS70-200_2.8GEDVRII.pdf I use the 5m - ...


5

The AF-S 28-70/2.8D f/2.8 has been out of production since 2007. It's an older version of the lens that's more or less be replaced by the newer 24-70. Nearly every lens that's been superseded tends to cost less than newer replacement models, especially if found used (when it was brand new in 2002, the 28-70/2.8 cost $1400, which if you cost adjust, comes in ...


5

AFAIK the 28-70 isn't being produced anymore since 2008-ish? So if you are buying a new one today chances are it's been in somebody's warehouse for at least 6 years burning a hole in their pocket. The new version also allegedly boasts a better nano-coating on the front element. Not sure what else might be making up for the price difference.


4

You don't necessarily need a $2000+ camera. As you said, the photographer is the most important part, however good cameras make life a whole lot easier and allow shooting in situations you otherwise couldn't. Particularly for low light, having full frame makes a big difference. Additionally, higher end cameras give more direct access to controls to make ...


3

This is obviously a motion blur of some sort. Unfortunately, there's nothing in the exif for the image shown. I'm going to concentrate on one small spot here to give my theory, note that it may not tell the full story. The thing we are seeing here is two overlapping images. From the Nikon site for the 5300 features: Two images taken with one ...


3

On the D610, I prefer using the 'Remote Shutter Delay' set to 3s than the Mirror Lock-Up. These two essentially do the same thing but need only one press for the former. This makes it possible to capture sharp long exposures even without a wireless remote. It works with it too though. Having the remote opens you the option to do much longer BULB exposures ...


3

This is a function of the sequential writing of images to the memory card. The camera can't write one image after the other while also generating previews and displaying them. It is not controlled by a setting. You could probably do it with tethering (connecting the camera to a computer as you shoot) but that is very situation dependent.


3

Locking the memory card (with the little slider) should do it. Rene's second-card solution seems good too, but I'd worry that with buttons being pressed quickly at random, it'd be easy to delete all or even format the card. An even better approach might be to use an eyefi card to automatically upload your photos as they are taken. That way, it doesn't ...


3

Nikon cameras (at least my D300 and D7100) have a lock button. Pressing this button will protect an image from accidental deletion. Review an image on your camera and press the lock button (the one with a key symbol) to protect the image.. Alternatively, you can setup your camera to make a backup copy on the second memory card. Deleting an image, is only ...


3

The mirror is interposed between the viewfinder and the sensor. The shutter is interposed between the mirror and the sensor. The mirror throws the image into the viewfinder, bypassing the sensor, so if you have a clear viewfinder image but live view (or an actual photo) shows a dark band, this suggests the problem is a sticky shutter. You will need to have ...


2

Since you asked this question, Nikon has come out with the SB-500, which I have and I love it. Works with CLS, so you already have a trigger. It's very compact and also has a 3-LED video light, which is fairly unique and could come in very handy for video or other uses.


2

On the face of it, this does sound very much like a problem with your camera - you've tested it with two lenses so it's (almost certainly) not the lens, and you've shown it's intermittent by unmounting and mounting the lens. Given that, my recommendations would be: If you've got any friends / co-workers / acquaintances with SLRs, ask them to have a quick ...


2

My experience with Nikon bodies is that each body takes a slightly different shaped focusing screen. Even the second link in your question points out that there are different screens for the F4 and F5 bodies. You'll need to make sure you're getting a screen specifically for your model of camera.


2

If you are confident it's the flash tube that's bad, and are experienced in electronics, you can purchase a flash tube online and replace it. But, you will need the right knowledge, tools, and experience, and this is not as simple as, say, simply unplugging something and replacing it. Desoldering and soldering are involved. Discharging the capacitor in ...


2

No, you didn't make a mistake if the camera is meeting your needs. The D90 has an advantage in terms of controls for someone who is more experienced, but the D5300 has an advantage in terms of sensor quality. So if you are pretty new and learning, a basic model that has fewer controls to confuse can actually be an advantage for now, particularly since, all ...


2

The D40X is plenty good enough to learn from before splashing any cash. The main point is that it is free. You can learn exactly what limitations it has (if any) and use that as a basis to refine what you want from a camera system in regards to your subject matter.


1

Any first DSLR is always a stepping stone onto the creative world of Photography and in reality, even a very basic DSLR, will be great for learning/growing and can last a lifetime of usage, or as long as the electronics and mechanics holdup. Time for change generally comes when the photographer has increased his/her ability to be creative and they find ...


1

All the testing that can be done has been, the ready light comes on - so it's charging ok, but with no output either through the commander mode or test button the guess at the flash tube is likely to be correct. Replacing a flash tube can be done but is absolutely not a job for the inexperienced. Even when turned off and with the batteries removed some ...


1

With in camera editing Nikon cameras ask if you want to save changes and you need to press "ok" to save the image, did this happen? The other thing that will sometimes happen is a new file is made and you might not be able to access it on your camera. If you connect the camera to your PC go to "Computer" or "My Computer" on your PC, open your camera there ...


1

You are essentially correct, yes. Firstly, you can leave Long Exposure NR on all the time. The 'mirror up' etc settings you are referring to determine what happens when you press the remote control. You want to set it to 'Mirror Up', because the action of raising the mirror causes the camera to vibrate, introducing a slight blur to your shot, which is ...


1

I'm going to suggest a different path: teach him to use the camera. My son went through the same excitement about pushing each button multiple times, and one time I had to do a full reset because I couldn't figure out how to undo some of the things he changed! My son had the camera in front of him since, well, he was born. I quickly figured out that when ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible