Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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7

There are many contributing factors: Longer focal-lengths require faster shutter-speeds to reproduce details sharply when hand-held. The general rule-of-thumb is 1 over the effective focal-length of the lens. So a 300mm on a DX camera has an angle of view equivalent to 450mm and so you should expect 1/500s at least to get sharp images. The solution against ...


5

The 85mm requires bigger glass elements to be able to offer the same aperture f/1.8 as a lens with a shorter focal length. This alone makes it cost more. In addition, it becomes heavier so it also needs a more powerful focus motor.


4

You seem to be under the misapprehension that all lenses should cost what a 50mm f/1.8 costs. The 50mm lens is actually the outlier. The focal length lends itself to simpler designs. An 85mm lens, to achieve f/1.8 must have glass that covers an aperture opening of 85mm/1.8 => 47.2mm vs. a 50mm/1.8 => 27.8mm. So it requires bigger glass elements throughout, ...


3

These settings don't seem "weird". It sounds like you have enabled "AF-F" mode — that's "full-time servo", where the camera tracks focus until you freeze it by pressing the shutter. You can disable that by changing to AF-S mode — autofocus-single. Nikon calls the level-indicator "virtual horizon". Turn that off in the setup menu if you don't want it. All ...


3

If your only goal is to use the maximum shutter speed, it likely will choose that speed under very brightly lit conditions (I.e. Outdoors on a sunny day). Another option is to look for a scene mode in the camera such as "Action" or "Sports" and that likely would use it as well.


3

I think you forgot one really basic thing. Image quality. You may want a side-by-side comparison of the much older D design to the digital-era G design on a full-frame camera, such as this one on the-digital-picture.com, where the two lenses are tested on a D3x. In that comparison, mousing over the test chart crops will switch between the two test setups. ...


3

"...all Pro FX bodies have AF motor built inside the body. Hence, SWM in 'AF-S' lens is redundant." Not necessarily. The performance of camera based focus motors and lens based focus motors is far from identical. SWM lenses tend to focus faster and more quietly than their non-SWM counterparts. Add the mechanical interface between the body and lens and the ...


2

I know this is an old question, but I just tried using an iPhone to record through my DSLR viewfinder and it seemed to work ok.


2

Both Nikon and Canon use ISO-compatible flash hotshoes on their cameras and feet on their flashes, so the Canon flash will fit on the Nikon hotshoe, its sync voltages are well within the limits a Nikon hotshoe can sustain, and the ground signal (rails) and sync (fire signal--the pin in the center of the foot's square) will be recognized and work, so the ...


2

I once encountered a D50 that had managed to get the mirror stuck in the up position. The mirror had gotten just skewed enough to hang on the side of the light box. It was a very delicate task to get it unstuck without damaging the mechanism that retains the mirror when locked up or for longer exposures. Damage that latch and the mirror will droop into the ...


2

It appears you are shooting indoors. At f/6.3 there's probably not enough edge light making it through the lens to the camera's AF sensor for the camera focus the lens. If you were in brighter conditions or aiming at very high contrast targets it might work better. The PDAF sensor in any SLR with AF compares edge light from opposite sides of the lens to ...


2

Get more groups, or at least different triggers. Just me, but consider getting some additional gear. Picking up a cheap 3rd party CLS-capable flash, such as a Yongnuo YN-586EX (make sure you get the Nikon version), would let you use your SB-800 as your commander, and give you four groups (three off-camera). Or using TTL radio triggers (Phottix Odin, Godox ...


2

one behind the subject over exposing a white background by one stop It sounds like you don't necessarily have to adjust this one as frequently as the other two. If you set this background flash to manual dumb optical slave mode (that is: let it fire in the manually adjusted settings when it sees another flash) you can distribute your other two flashes over ...


1

The extra scale is a depth of field scale. It's basically using slide ruler technology against the distance scale to let you set your DoF the way you want. The symmetrical numbers are for a given aperture setting. If you set the one number against one distance, them matching opposite number tells you the other end of the DoF, in distance. To set ...


1

These are completely different designs from decades apart. The F/1.8G and F/1.4G have a window to show the focus distance because the camera can control it via autofocus. When the camera drives a lens like that, the focus scale rotates within the window. The user can also turn the focus ring itself to change the focus distance. The F/1.2 has a direct focus ...


1

How do these three lenses perform in producing sharp images when used wide open? It's often said in that the 50mm f/1.2 lens is Nikon's sharpest 50mm f/2 lens. At f/2, it's tack sharp, sharper at f/2 than either the 1.4 or 1.8. Here's the thing: almost no lens is at its sharpest wide open. Every lens is different, but usually it's at least a couple stops ...


1

What you are looking for is called tethering. As far as I know, no camera from the Nikon Coolpix Pxxx line can be tethered. Lightroom doesn't support it : https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/kb/tethered-camera-support.html The guys from controlmynikon.com aren't supporting it : http://www.controlmynikon.com/#!download/cdhg Same thing from digicamcontrol.com ...


1

According to page 267 of the D5500 Reference Manual, using custom setting f2 to set the AE-L/AF-L button to AF-ON prevents the shutter release button from focusing.


1

Chris Walton already answered how to use a single circular polarizer for your two lenses of different sizes. But I want to address the implicit question "why are there such different prices in circular polarizers?" One of the reasons for the large difference in price between polarizer filters is quality. More expensive filters probably have better coatings ...


1

These two lenses have different filter sizes. This means you will either need two filters (55mm and 62mm) or a 62mm filter with a 55-62 step up adaptor. (If you use a step up ring, the smaller filter size lens will not be able to use its lens hood when the filter is in place.) The filter is useful in landscape work in some circumstances: removing reflections,...


1

The 35 mm will include more background. Decide if you prefer more context in the image or more isolation. There will be a bit more distortion with the wider lens. It will be more apparent in head shots than full body shots though. Otherwise, 35mm and 50mm are close and it is a matter of personal style and preference. Also, when you buy a lens, think about ...



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