Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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7

Actually, it's kind of the opposite. You need a lens with autofocusing capabilities--you just don't need one with a focus motor. That is, you'd still need AF lenses, they just don't have to be AF-S or AF-I lenses. AI lenses, for example, were designed before Nikon added autofocus to its cameras and lenses, and can only be manually focused, regardless of ...


4

No — an autofocus motor in the body will not make older, manual focus lenses into autofocus lenses. Any autofocus lens needs a motor — it's what does the "auto", after all. (Just like an automobile would be just a ... moble without one.) There are two primary places where this motor can be placed — either in the lens itself, or in the camera body. Each of ...


4

Your Question is beyond broad in spectrum. You only stated what body you had and nothing about your level of skills or what lenses you already tested or looking to buy. Lenses can range from 150$ (or less) second hand to 2000$ or more. I will attempt to answer your question in detail since I own a D3200 myself. I have the stock 18-55mm that comes with a ...


3

The only difference in terms of sharpness I see is that the first shot appears to be at f/2.8 and slightly front-focused, while the second appears to be shot at f/1.8 and either slightly front focused if you are aiming for the branch in the left central area or grossly back focused if you were aiming for the nearer branch. When viewed at the same display ...


3

The particular lossy compression used here is nothing to worry about. Here's why. Camera sensors are more or less linear devices, if you double the amount of light you double the signal produced by the sensor. Our eyes work logarithmically, so if you double the amount of light, it appears much less than twice as bright. Another example of this is if you ...


2

As this graph shows, the main differences between Canon and Nikon(Sony) sensors only really show up at low ISO: but at low ISO you can't really see the difference, not without post processing a RAW file. Here is the best post i could find demonstrating this (big) difference: Nikon DX vs Canon APS-C Now this difference will not matter to a lot of people ...


2

Even with lossy compression the NEF file still contains a lot more information than a JPEG file. There is considerably more data per pixel in the NEF file. Even if the 14 bits color depth is reduced somewhat by the compression, it's still way more than the 8 bits of a JPEG image. You won't see much difference between the JPEG and the NEF in a direct ...


2

Yes, that is normal, and a correct description. The recessed pin is for safety, to keep out unapproved connections. Be aware that there is about 325 volts on this cable. It does not just attach a battery as such, but attaches a battery powered high voltage converter, which directly charges the flash capacitor.


2

With the current firmware of the D3200 you can't crop the image arbitrarily, you can however trim to the aspects (3:2, 4:3, 5:4, 16:9 and 1:1). This can only be done to sizes in certain steps only. You can access this function through the retouch menu and then jump to the function "Trim". I would strongly advise against using this method to crop the photo. ...


1

The filter thread is 67mm on the Nikon 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR AF-S DX NIKKOR Zoom Lens. This information can be found on the Nikon product page here: http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/zoom/normalzoom/af-s_dx_18-140mmf_35-56g_ed_vr/


1

Prime lenses are generally sharper due to the reduced diffraction by not having the extra lens elements required for zoom lenses. A prime lens, even a cheap one, is a master of one focal length, that's all it needs to do and generally, it does it as well as the glass permits. Whereas, a zoom has to get it right over a much larger focal range, in other ...


1

The 24-70 is an f/2.8 lens. You are shooting at f/2.8. The lens is fine. Read up on what Depth Of Field is and you will understand why your pictures appear blurry. They are not, you are just using a small Depth Of Field.


1

I went onto the Anker support area and was advised that all would be OK. It was. It charged and appeared to behave in exactly the same as as if it were plugged into the charger that came with the camera.


1

The maximum power specified in USB 1 & 2 is 500 mA, and in USB 3 it's 900 mA. The Anker 60W can deliver up to 2400 mA, so that is way more than the specification. The Anker is supposed (according to the manufacturer) to detect what it is that you are charging, and only deliver the power that the unit can handle. If that is true also for your camera, ...


1

If it's doing it with the 35mm lens and not with the 70-300mm, then it's most likely a problem with the 35mm. Try cleaning the contacts on the camera and the lens, and check that they haven't been damaged or overly scratched. The contacts are only attached to the lens mount by a small chip, so it could be that something on the lens mount or in the lens ...


1

Try giving the focus ring a little nudge when the autofocus gets stuck. I have a Tamron 18-270 which has the same issue when zoomed at 150mm or more. It seems that due to the small change in focus required, the camera does not power the motor enough to get it moving, resulting in the noises. I don't know if you have this exact issue, it could be that the ...


1

This 300mm seems to be lightweight (755g), but definitely not cheap! http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1111442-REG/nikon_2223_af_s_nikkor_300mm_f_4e.html



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