Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...


6

Focus confirmation does indeed work. I have a D7000 (which is ergonomically very similar to a D600 - think of a D600 as a D7000 with an upgraded sensor) and have been using a Nikon 80-200mm f/4.5 AI on it perfectly fine. I just rotate the focus dial until the green confirmation dot shows up on the screen. An important concept to realize about a camera's ...


5

These are very different cameras. The D800 is very high resolution camera which is ideal for making very large prints The Df is an ultra-sensitive camera with extremely good low-light performance. For landscape, architecture or any other type of photography which easily allows you to use low ISO, a D800 will deliver higher image-quality and the potential ...


5

I'd say "no, it's not good enough", but it's hard to rule it out absolutely without knowing more details about you're going to try using it. To take each of your three use cases: Wildlife: probably not enough reach. You're looking at 400mm or more for typical wildlife photography. Football: If you can get somewhere near the sidelines, 200mm probably gives ...


4

Lens hoods are used only to keep out light from outside the field of view, so they're not relevant when the light source is part of the image. Generally, lens flares are unwanted artifacts of the lens, so to eliminate them you just have to get a better lens - or filter, if you use any, since filters can also cause them. However, your description "horrible ...


4

The color of the background doesn't matter so much as the brightness of the subject. A white background won't interfere unless it is lit brighter than the subject. If the white background is intensely lit however, then either spot or center weighted would work. If you have a good spot you know you want to base your exposure on, then spot would be fine. ...


3

While DXoMark's scores are never the only thing to go on, the general consensus of their results matches up with conventional wisdom, though not by as much as would normally be expected. Since the 55-300 covers a longer total range than the 70-200 it pays a slight price in overall image quality. When wide, the 300 mm seems to suffer particularly strongly ...


3

Exposure-compensation is simply an offset to metering. A camera decides how to expose a scene, taking into account that offset. It must usually select a combination of aperture, shutter-speed and ISO in order to expose accordingly. You may fix the ISO, in which case it must vary the remaining two parameters which ends up being mostly shutter-speed. The ...


2

From your question, it sounds like you have a Sony camera, and that camera does not have a removable lens. If that's the case, you cannot use a Nikon fisheye lens with your camera. A fisheye lens from Nikon is designed to be the only lens on the camera!! It's not an add-on accessory that you can just slip on to the end of an existing lens, or anything like ...


2

If you have followed the procedure outlined in this video to free the red gear inside the bottom of your camera and it hasn't corrected the problem, it is probably time to write off your D40x. There are plenty of other places on the web that give slightly different variations of the same procedure. Some users have had success using mirror lockup or the ...


2

Sure. Because you are on a Full Frame (FX) camera, it is a 'normal' lens and it will help you a lot to understand better the art of photography. See here for the details. D700 is a good camera, however its ISO performance is somewhat... um... outdated. It has let's say 'problems' in indoors and other low-light conditions. An F/1.8 is a must in such ...


2

Basically, it just tunes how light or dark the camera's auto-exposure will aim to make the picture. It is the equivalent of applying an adjustment to your camera's "light meter". Note: In reality your digital compact camera won't have a light meter but will judge the lightness of a scene by measuring the lightness from the sensor, then adjusting, then ...


1

For sports photography, you need to be able to use a fast shutter speed as you'll always want to use 1/500s or faster exposures in order to avoid motion blur (rule of thumb, 1/250s or faster for posed photos, 1/500s or faster for people moving). A wider aperture would therefore be recommended. I wouldn't say that a f/5.6 would be enough, except in bright ...


1

I'd probably suggest neither. For the range of things you want to do, the 50mm isn't going to cover shots from far away, despite the fact it would be a great portrait lens. The 55-200 on the other hand covers a long range, but it is probably a bit too long to handle all of the situations well. If you have the kit lens, I'd probably start out with a lens ...


1

Unfortunately there is no better option than removing any filters you have on the lens, making sure the lens is clean and getting a better lens. Most of those kind of artifacts come from reflections within the lens and are an actual characteristic of the lens. Removing filters reduces the number of layers of glass it can reflect of of. Cleaning the lens ...



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