Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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20

Without a doubt the fact that you're using a prime lens (fixed focal length) on the nikon is causing the difference in sharpness, especially if you're comparing it to the Canon 18-135 kit lens or Sigma 17-70 DC. Not that those are horrible lenses but the gulf in sharpness between them and the NIKKOR 35mm f2 fixed would be very wide. I'm assuming you're ...


16

The sharpness differences are probably due to the lenses, not the cameras. In general, you will find that prime lenses are sharper than zoom lenses, and lenses with short zoom ranges are sharper than lenses with long zoom ranges. So I'm not surprised that the borrowed 7.5x zoom lens is not as sharp as your 4x zoom lens, which in turn is not as sharp as the ...


15

The "Job nr" is not an error message, it's a status message. You have enabled the in-camera long-exposure noise reduction - the "nr" part of the message. With noise reduction enabled, after you create a long exposure, the camera takes about the same amount of time to process the image, apply noise reduction, and write image to the card. If you're creating ...


14

Single Point Auto-focus: Fastest and most accurate auto-focus mode, great to use in most situations, including predictable action shots where you can keep the object on the point. I like to decouple the auto-focus mechanism from the half-press to avoid focusing on the background if the subject unexpectedly moves off the point. The camera is told which ...


13

Unless your unit is defective, by default most DSLRs will not release the shutter if: Focus has not been acquired. The flash is charging The buffer is full 1 and 2 can be over-ridden using the custom settings. If you go to MF or AF-C (which defaults to Release-Priority) you should not experience this due to #1. If the flash is down (and no flash is ...


12

A good tripod is useful in many situations. Basic editing software is also useful, something like Adobe Photoshop Elements (though there are good free alternatives). Other than this, it really depends on the kind of photography you plan on doing, and what budget you have. If you plan on doing landscapes, then the aforementioned tripod is a must, along with ...


10

Set it to continuous autofocus: AF-C. The camera will then (a) always try to keep whatever is under the active focus point in focus and (b) fire the shutter whenever you ask, regardless of whether the device thinks it's in focus or not. You might also want to set it to the center focus point and shoot wider than you would otherwise, cropping in post. AF-A ...


10

It sounds like you are interested in an Auto ISO type mode, that Pentax refers to as TAv mode. This allows you to manually adjust the aperture and shutter speed, and the camera determines the optimal ISO. Nikon does not have a special name for this mode, but you can achieve the same results by putting the camera into "M" for manual mode, and setting your ...


10

The Nikon D60 is a very old version of the D5100. The D5000 was actually between the two in the models history. The D5100 is a step up in every important aspect, if the price is the same, I see no reason why to get the D60 over the D5100. The D5100 is the current up to date model with great high ISO performance, a flip out screen, and other current day ...


9

There is no way to go wrong with ANY modern DSLR, however you should choose the one that best fits your needs. I don't know why you are comparing these two particular models. Between the 2, the Canon T2i is newer but the Nikon D90 is a more advanced model. In practical terms this means you get higher resolution in images and video with the T2i. But, you get ...


9

Either one. Unless you have any specific needs that you haven't mentioned, either one of those camera bodies will take really great photos. If you're wondering more in general about choosing a DSLR brand, hit that question. You did mention auto mode, if that's what you're really looking for you might look at whether you really need a DSLR. Some of the ...


9

If the pictures are all pure black (as in every pixel is colour 0,0,0) then that sounds like a fairly terminal electronics problem. If you're getting black photos where noise is visible if you boost the exposure on the computer then it sounds like a shutter malfunctioning. If the viewfinder is not blacking out momentarily it could be the mirror is staying ...


8

The Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.4 G is not designed for the smaller DX sensor and has the same image circle as the 1.8 Are you thinking of the AF-S 35mm f/1.8 G DX which is designed for a smaller sensor compared to the AF-S 35mm f/1.4G? In any case the size of the image circle is of minor importance to the light gathering ability - only the aperture matters, as ...


8

In general I wouldn't recommend doing anything in camera that is irreversibly "baked" into the image, as such things can always be done better, with more control, and more importantly the option to undo, in post on your PC. There is another feature called Long Exposure Noise reduction which shoots a black frame (i.e. one in which the shutter is closed) in ...


8

There is no way to change the firmware of Nikon's cameras other than upgrades from Nikon. For some Canon digital compacts, there's an unsupported project called CHDK that can add certain features to the cameras. Allowing Random J Hacker to load weird firmware into his expensive camera is a customer support nightmare. For every person who knows what he is ...


8

Yes. Do not think about them as D100 lenses. They are Nikon F-Mount lenses. The D100 is Nikon DSLR with a 1.5X sensor crop and will work with any F-mount lens. This includes the Nikkor, Sigma, Tokina, Tamron, etc. Additionally, the D90 and D100 have a built-in focus motor, so autofocus works with AF and AF-S lenses.


7

You are not likely to find many technique descriptions that is specifically targeted at your camera or lenses, but that is not a problem. The photographic terms are pretty much the same for all cameras, so you just have to learn how to apply the settings to your camera (which you can look up in the users manual), and you can use any method description that ...


7

The Nikon D90 can in fact accept a wired remote. It plugs into the GPS port which is the second rubber-covered area on the side of the D90. While some cameras have separate ports, the D90 uses this single port for both purposes. Here are a couple options from Amazon: Satechi TR-M Timer Remote Control for Nikon D90 GSI Super Quality Multi-Function Timer ...


6

Short answer is that all the 35mm and 50mm prime lenses are good ones. The difference between AF and AF-S, is that the AF-S has a built in silent wave motor (SWM), whereas the AF lenses require a motor in the camera body to drive the auto-focus. The D90 has a built-in AF motor, so either AF or AF-S is fine. AF-S might focus faster. Inside focus is nice if ...


6

As ahockley and Guffa suggest, but don't necessarily break out this way, you have two different needs. Learn about how to be a good photographer. Learn how to use your camera. You will need to address these two needs differently. I would begin by getting a good book on basic photography (it can even be an old book that assumes film cameras) and begin to ...


6

The pro's are self-evident: Lower noise on high-iso The biggest con: Loss of detail The high-iso noise reduction might remove detail mistakenly. While newer camera algorithms have gotten better at it, it's still not fool proof. The settings between Off, Low, Normal and High dictate the amount of tolerance used for the setting, which affects the ...


6

Despite the D90 being a full two years older than the D3100 I think it still holds up against the newer model. The D90 does exposure and white balance bracketing, not achievable with the D3100. Also the screen on the D90 is superior, with 920,000 dot resolution vs the 230,000 of the D3100. One area the D90 falls down is in video - if you want to use ...


5

Like many in-camera features, this boils down to how much do you trust your camera manufacturer vs. how much do you think you can do better yourself by doing it manually in post-production. As others have noted, once you do something in-camera, you often can't undo it in post. With noise reduction, you'll be losing image detail just like you would when ...


5

You can absolutely use other triggering mechanisms, but the wireless part of the CLS uses the on-camera flash. One way that's cheaper than the PocketWizard route is a cable. Refer to Strobist's Lighting 101 Series for hints on connectivity options. If you're using Commander mode, did you set the on-camera flash to -- (essentially off)? From what I can ...


5

Ensure you have the current images copied off via Nikon Transfer with your D90 connected directly to your computer, then I would suggest using the D90 to format the entire memory card to remove any pre-installed software and/or directories. This should resolve any access issues when putting the memory card in to a card reader. On the D90 there are two ...


5

Assuming you have a lens that can do f/1.4, set yourself to manual, with aperture at 1.4, shutter speed to 1/60, and then turn on auto-iso (in the menu; I use this on the d300 all the time, but I'm sure it's in a different location in the d90). That way, the aperture and shutter speed will be constant, but the iso will fluctuate as you like. I set my auto ...


5

Without knowing all of the details or seeing examples of the problems, here are a few thoughts that come to mind: You noted the models were moving, so you'll want to use the Continuous Focus mode (Nikon's term - Canon calls this AI-Servo). Once the camera obtains focus on a subject it will attempt to "follow" that subject and make focus adjustments so ...


5

I hate to say this, but first make sure you're pressing the right button, as I always press the wrong one. There are two similar buttons. One is the function button near the top of the lens, and the DOF preview button is almost under the lens. If you press the DOF button, even with the aperture wide open, it will make a very clunky sound, like when you ...



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