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11

No, a higher resolution sensor does not increase the difficulty of handheld shooting. It does mean that is is more difficult to realize the full potential of the higher resolution sensor, but that doesn't mean the results are worse than they would be with a lower resolution sensor.


7

I would recommend taking a look at the Nikon D800 manual which can be found online here. Page 207 of the manual describes the features of the D800 and time lapse photography. You also will want to pay particular notice to the tips of the bottom of page 209 where it describes what modes time-lapse does not work in. If you have a question beyond something ...


5

Short answer: No. Since D7000 is APS-C, it has a sensor size of 1/2 the area of D800, which is full frame. A full frame sensor with the same pixel density (not pixel size, but pixel-to-pixel distance) as D7000 in full frame would equal 32 megapixels. Since D800 is 36 megapixels, it will be marginally more difficult to get "all pixels perfect" with the same ...


4

It is quite possible that each camera performs better in some specific low light situations than the other, and I think that is the case with these two specific cameras. Low light performance is a pretty general term. Usually when someone talks about low light performance they are talking about how much or how little noise is present in an image shot in ...


4

Not at all, and I have both. HOWEVER - You are also working with a much larger sensor, in theory, given the same (ish) field of view, IE a 50mm on the D7000 and an 80mm on the D800, the affect of an identical movement would create a more noticeable blur on the image, when viewed at pixel level.


3

tr;dr 1. The lens focal length matters more in practice. 2. There won't be more blur detectable when looking at a full-screen image, but since the D800 can resolve finer detail, it can also resolve smaller motion blur (if you're pixel peeping). If you are talking about the difficulty of having no motion blur visible at the pixel level (not full image), ...


3

I have the ZE (Canon mount) version of this exact lens, and my friend has the Nikon ZF.2 version, so am in a good position to advise. It has both pro's and con's, and they must be considered carefully as this is no small outlay of change to purchase! Firstly, this lens is amazingly sharp when you get it right ... I say this because I've used it to create ...


3

AFAIK there is no way to do that with camera settings, nor with any mainstream tethering software (You may be able to do that if you don't mind getting your hands dirty and coding something, but it would just be too much effort). If you have the resources available you can do that shooting at 1/30 or more and firing a flash at the beginning (although I ...


3

Considering how close the noise performance of those two cameras are to each other, I would think the very significant difference in resolution would be a more important consideration for any serious landscape photographer. Deciding between the D600 and D800 based on noise performance at low ISO is like comparing two sports cars based on their braking ...


3

All large sensor cameras top-notch for landscape photography because no matter which, noise is extremely low around base ISO which is what you will be most likely shooting at. From a tripod I might add, which is essential to get critical sharpness. Noise being the same at such low ISO setting, what you are left is the question of resolution which depends on ...


3

To do the self-portraits you can use interval timer shooting. [Menu] [Shooting menu] [Interval timer shooting] (check the manual if you cant find it) [Start time = now] (you waste the first shot but it saves you having to wait a minute) [Interval time 00:00:10 seconds] ( or however long you need between shots ) [Set 5 intervals X 1] ( this will take 5 timed ...


3

The camera will display the image based on your existing picture control settings, but these settings don't specifically mean anything when dealing with the NEF after the fact. Lightroom has some presets (I don't use Aperture, so I can't speak to it) for raw development that apply a "start point" that are quite similar to the picture controls, but are not ...


2

Briefly summarizing solutions by cases following discussion with @PatFarrell in other answer (embellished with my own understanding): In dim environments flash will always freeze motion because the flash itself is around 1/1000th sec and most of the light collected during the exposure is from the flash. For fill flash in a brighter environment, if 1/60 is ...


2

I also use a D800, as far as I am aware there is no way to set the camera to focus after the timer - the only method that I could think of would be to either buy a remote release or shoot tethered.


2

I struggle to understand why you would rate low noise over amount of detail as the main criteria for a landscape camera, but if this is the case then there's no reason to pay extra for the D800 as noise performance is very similar when resized to 24MP.


2

The Nikon D600 has AF fine-tuning and it works exactly the same way as on the D800. It will adjust focus front or back a number of tiny steps. The step size is unspecified so you have to do it by just trying. If your lens is severely off, it is possible that no number will be suitable and you will have to have it calibrated for your camera by Nikon. Note AF ...


2

The camera body will impact auto-focus speed, but most of the sharpness is going to come from the lens rather than the camera body. Throw a sharp lens on a 5 year old DSLR and it will likely look sharper than a kit lens on a brand spanking new high end camera. The camera can only capture the image projected on the sensor. If that isn't sharp, neither will ...


2

The maximum sync speed is the speed where the whole sensor is exposed. At higher speeds, the two shutters form a slit as they cross the sensor. But most modern cameras have a max sync speed of 1/250 or so. 1/60 is really slow, I think my 40 year old Nikon F could do that. When you use a flash, its the light of the flash that stops action/motion. Most ...


2

Will it make it more difficult? No. However, the higher resolution will mean you will capture more pixel level motion - i.e. a higher resolution sensor is more likely to retain minor movement at the pixel level, BUT this is not visible when you compare equally sized images from a higher and resolution sensor (unless you print/show images so large that ...


1

I'm going to go against the flow here and say, yes, a larger sensor does make hand-holding more difficult. I shoot with a D800 now; previously a D300. The D800's 36 MP capture a lot more information than the D300's 12 MP, of course. Simply, take a photo with a tripod or high shutter speed, then compare it to a shot made with a barely-hand-holdable shutter ...


1

As others have answered, no. A higher resolution does not impede on the ability to shoot handheld. What you may have read, is that the D800 handles high ISO better than the D7000. Generally, larger sensors handle high ISO ranges better. I'm not quite sure of the technicalities as to why this is, but my personal opinion is because manufactures will invest ...


1

Sites like DXoMark attempt to make a technical, non-subjective way of comparing them, but, particularly when comparing low light performance across models, things fall apart pretty quickly. Nikon uses a higher level of automatic noise reduction and provides algorithms for DXo to use in their testing where as Canon does not, so the way DXo goes about it, ...


1

There are at usually two modes for Live-View on most modern DSLRs. One of these modes will use Phase-Detect AF which basically flips the mirror up to perform autofocus and uses the same points which is why it will coincide with the ones you see in the OVF. All other modes use Contrast-Detect AF which is performed using the image-sensor which means it is ...


1

The LCD brightness is normally adjusted for ease of operation and visibility. It's meant for basic review to make sure you have the data, not for exposure correctness. There are two things you can do, though: Learn to ignore the appearance of the image and trust the histogram on review instead. Turn down the brightness of the LCD screen. It may be harder ...


1

Short answer to your question is: no. Long answer to your question is: The chart from Ken Rockwell is specific to Nikkor lenses, not lenses with appropriate adapters for modern F-mount cameras. Given that Nikon is a significant brand, there are quite a few adapters from various lens mounts to the modern F-mount, including the Pentacon Six, as you ...


1

It really depends on what you want the pictures to look like. I recently shot the last two groups of an outdoor festival and used two bodies: A 1.6x crop body with a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens and a full frame body with a 24-105mm f/4 lens. I chose the 24-105mm lens over my 24-70mm f/2.8 lens due to image stabilization on the 24-105mm f/4. I had stage access and ...


1

It's a bit of a personal choice, but the Zeiss lenses all have a reputation for great quality. Before I'd spend this much money, I'd rent it. I just checked lensrental.com and they don't rent the 100 (although they do rent the 85), but Borrowlenses does have it. It will probably cost you $100 to rent (with shipping and insurance) but I think its money well ...


1

That is normal, if your image also appears brighter when you load the jpeg thumbnail from the raw file. That's how mine reacts as well. It is because the in-camera settings clips more of the highlights and/or apply more gamma/brightness than your default setting in your raw software. The raw shows more accurately how you actually exposed the images and the ...


1

I'm not aware of any way to do this; my D300 works the same way. I usually switch to manual focus and either have a stand-in subject or set a small enough aperture to account for any misfocus. (Finding a stand-in subject is easy, though: use your camera bag, a rock, or even turn around to find anything else at roughly the same distance.)


1

Here's something straight from Nikon. If the stock flip down diffuser is used on the SB800 (probably the 600 as well) then the camera is programmed to only sync at 1/60. There is a sensor in the flash that limits the camera. I flipped mine back up took a shot on a sunny day and the flash sync'd at 1/250 Hope this helps



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