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21

It is simply too dark for the camera to focus. And by default it will refuse to take the shot unless it has focused. There are some possible workarounds: - Some cameras can be forced to take the shot when you press the button, no matter what. The inevitable result is an unsharp photo. I don't suppose that this is what you want. I assume that you are using ...


13

These are probably the result of defective pixels on the image sensor, and are commonly referred to as "stuck", "dead", or "hot" pixels. This is a common occurrence with image sensors. There are several ways to deal with this problem: Replace the camera - this is probably the most expensive solution Replace the sensor - this may be as or more expensive ...


11

The rate is 4 frames per second in either case. The difference is in how long it can keep it up — 67 JPEG files of the "large fine" quality level, or 11 RAW frames. That's because it can basically keep going as long as it has RAM to buffer the files, and has to slow down as soon as it has to actually start saving to relatively pokey flash memory. The limit ...


10

Yes, the D5000 has a Rangefinder option. When in manual focus mode, this replaces the exposure meter in your viewfinder with a rangefinder meter. If the markings appear to the left, focus is in front of the subject. If the markings appear to the right, focus is behind the subject. To focus, you simply turn the focusing ring in the direction indicated by the ...


8

I believe you'll need to set the 'release mode' in your camera to 'Continuous' to get it to burst the three shots. Also, reportedly, if your camera is on a self timer it will also take the three shots in a single button press after the time delay.


7

VR: I don't think VR matters at all for portraits, where you can control the lighting to make sure you have a suitably fast shutter speed (1/125 or 1/250) to avoid blur due to camera shake. AF: This depends on how good you are at focusing manually. For portraits with shallow depth of field (wide aperture), it's critical to make sure that one or both of the ...


6

My site (shameless plug) http://lenshero.com makes it easy to find lenses, for example here are 14 lenses for the D5000 with image stabilization and focus motors for less than $600. You can then easily filter by brand/focal length etc.


6

Camera shake and cropping are definite candidates, but I would say that the most likely culprit is manual focusing. Are you using the green focus indicator light to judge focus? If not then you will almost certainly be out of focus. I find it impossible to focus by eye through my D300. Digital SLRs' focus screens are designed to show as bright an image as ...


6

Website D5000 D3100 Continuous Shooting D3100 3 frames per sec D5000's 4 frames per sec D5000 is better for continuous shooting Video Shooting D3100 shoots full HD (1080p) D5000 does not D3100 is better for video shot from the camera Resolution D3100 has a 14.2MP sensor (23.1 x 15.4 mm CMOS sensor) 4,608 x 3,072 [L] 3,456 x 2,304 [M] 2,304 x ...


6

It is eminently possible to teach yourself photography, as there are a vast amount of resources available these days to enable you to do just that. Perhaps a good place to start would be to get a book on general photography techniques, using that to learn the proper terms to search for online. The web has thousands of tutorials and blogs - just search for ...


5

That's a newer-technology (AF-S) lens and newer cameras, so they're all compatible. Ninon SLR Camera to Lens Compatibility. The lens will work "well" on any of those cameras. They all have the same sensor size (DX), so you'll get the same field of view / effective focal length. Which is the "best" camera for you will depend mostly on other factors. Nikon ...


5

Do you have your "low light focus assist" turned on? It's a little light (between the shutter release and the lens on my D90) that illuminates the target area so that the autofocus can work. It does this because, as you've discovered, AF doesn't work in low lighting conditions. It's easy to check: point your camera in a dark spot (or leave the lens cap on) ...


5

Unfortunately in the world of DSLR lenses, you really can't get past some graphs: While this is not always the case, it's a basic idea of the trade offs. The longer the lens can zoom in and out, the more image quality problems arise (chromatic aberration, barreling etc). More often than not, a higher quality lens will also have a larger fixed aperture ...


5

The equivalent to the S95's 28-105mm focal length would be an 18-70mm lens. The already-mentioned 17-55/2.8 will probably be the closest you can get to that. The S95 can have a big zoom range with a physically small lens because it has a much smaller sensor than on your DSLR, so it needs a smaller-diameter lens to project onto that sensor. Unfortunately, ...


5

According to numerous reviews and Nikon forums, this lens belongs to so-called Nikon's Dream Team and, as Alen above said, it's a must have. Firstly, it's a really bright and fast prime lens with a rather unusual focal length. Most importantly, you can get this lens for a very reasonable price. The lens is really small and light but well built. The f/1.8 ...


4

I can heartily recommend the Nikkor 35mm f/1.8 AF-S. It's compact, lightweight and has great image quality. It's not very expensive either. As a counter-indication, it's pretty common on the used market around here (Stockholm, Sweden) which I take as an indication that it's not a lens for everyone. Personally I enjoy shooting with primes and this is a lens ...


4

Are you using single capture focusing mode? (S)? (This is a physical switch on the camera, switching between S/C/A). If you are using continuous focusing or auto, the camera will allow you to take a shot even if you do not have focus confirmation. Also, if your VR is faulty, it can shake enough to create a blur. To test focusing and lens fault (lenses can ...


3

They look like stuck pixels, basically these sensor elements always output a high signal regardless of the incoming light. This is being incorrectly interpreted by the demosaicing algorithm resulting in purple spots. As a sensor defect there is no "fix" as such but you can map stuck pixels in software which prevents them from contributing to the final ...


3

This is probably because your camera can't focus. If you set it to manual focus, it will allow you to take the shot regardless. This of course introduces the problem of getting it right manually, which is another skill altogether! If you can, illuminate the scene first, focus using AF, then switch to manual, restore the dimmer lighting, and shoot. Other ...


3

If size is your primary concern, you may want to take a look at the voightlander 40mm F/2. or 20mm F/3.5 They're "pancake" lens design, so is about as small as you'll be able to find for a full DSLR. In combination with the better low light performance of the D5000 over the S95, they'll both work very well for low light. The downside is that they are ...


3

Have you tried shooting from tripod (or other flat and stable surface) ? If this solves the problem then the reason is camera shake. Also it is rather hard to manualy focus using small viewfinder of entry level DSLR.


3

Yes, it will work with any of this cameras. In more details - Nikon AF lenses will only autofocus with cameras with in body motor, because there is no motor inside lens. Among cameras you mentioned only D90 has such motor. AF-S lenses have motor inside them, and body just controls this motor - any of cameras you mentioned will autofocus with such lenses. ...


3

Manual Focusing with the 50mm f/1.8 is extremely hard and the depth of field is very shallow when the lens is wide open. The viewfinder on the D5000 is small and the live view doesn't provide enough detail to focus. Often, you will think your focus is correct, but will find that it's slightly out of focus when you get back to the computer. So, I would not ...


3

Sigma Photo makes quite a few lenses for Nikon with those features. Their lenses range from consumer to professional grade, with corresponding price differences to go with them. As for quality, it does vary with them, but much less so than in the past and they're producing some very good optics these days, including some unique ones that nobody else has. In ...


3

First you need to set the AF area mode to Single or Dynamic on your LCD display. Then you select the point using the D-pad. You can quickly return to the centre point by pressing the OK button. The difference between Single and Dynamic is that Single keeps the focus point wherever you put it, whereas Dynamic will try and automatically keep the object ...


3

Exposure Bracketing Flash bracketing can be done on some Nikon bodies using the exposure bracketing function that you're already familiar with. With a flash attached, the flash power will be adjusted during the three exposures, along with ambient exposure also being bracketed by varying shutter speed or aperture. The D90 has a custom setting E4, which ...


3

It is compatible. All cameras supporting SDXC also accept SDHC and SD. SD cards are limited to 2 GB. SDHC to 32 GB and SDXC have a theoretical limit of 2 TB. SDXC memory cards also usually use a different file-system which is exFAT, rather than FAT. In the case of 16GB, it is always SDHC. Although it would be possible to make a 16GB SDXC cards, no one does ...


3

If you had only experienced the issue with one lens then the first place to check would be the springs under the contact points that are in the lens for the Nikon system. I suppose there is the possibility both lenses share the same problem, but it is not very likely. Since you have seen the issue with two different lenses on the same body it suggests there ...


2

There are certainly very highly regarded third party lenses out there. Sigma uses the OS (optical stabilisation) designation for lenses with vibration reduction, and HSM for a hypersonic focus motor (I believe all Sigma and Tamron lenses have built in motors of some form so compatibility is not a problem). Tamron uses the VC (vibration compensation) ...



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