Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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17

Nikon with AF-I and AF-S Sigma with HSM (and older ones that list as "with motor for Nikon" or the like obviously) Tamron with USD (and older ones that list as "with motor for Nikon" or the like obviously) Tokina lenses specifically listing "built-in AF motor drive" as a feature


12

What about using an Eye-Fi wireless SD card?


10

These are definitely edited. The first one you note looks like it's had heavy retouching done on the model's skin, and the third one is definitely a composite of two images. That said, the fact they're edited has nothing to do with the camera... for these style of images they'd be edited and post-processed even if you had a $8000 camera body.


9

The 50mm f/1.8 AF will meter on the D40, it does have a chip. But it will not AF. You have to set all[1] Nikkor lenses with aperture rings to the smallest aperture in order for Program and Shutter priority modes to work. The reason is that the camera body will set the aperture at the moment of taking the shot in these modes, and the aperture has to be in a ...


9

An SB800 master and SB600 slave is one option, another is using radio triggers like PocketWizards (expensive) or PT-04s (cheap) and trigger the flashes. The former will give you ETTL capabilities, while the latter won't, unless you go for the newer PWs, the Mini and Flexes. Another way is to use the pop-up flash to trigger a flash with a built-in optical ...


9

There is serious post-processing done as @ahockley said. What you seem to imply and I think should be addressed is that the Nikon D40 is not capable of producing outstanding images. Despite being entry-level, a D40, as all similar DSLRs, can produce almost any image which is possible by a high-end model when viewed up to a certain resolution (if the image ...


6

Lens doesn't matter much. Exposures will likely be long, on the order of a second or so, even with a fast lens, so use whatever you have. A zoom can be handy if you want to do abstract stuff (see below) I would suggest you set the camera to Manual exposure. Otherwise the camera will try to make all your images look like daytime. Start with aperture at ...


5

So, the answer to this is "no", there isn't. You can disable it in some circumstances, but as you've seen, it will keep coming back on. The user interface of many entry-level DSLRs is designed around the rear LCD screen, and these cameras also generally don't offer a huge amount of customization. This is also the case on the D3100, which is roughly a ...


5

The camera makes a best guess as to what it thinks is the primary subject of a photo. Given that the camera has multiple (three) autofocus points, sometimes it guesses wrong. There are a couple ways to overcome the fact that autofocus can't always guess where you'd like the focus point: Manually choose the correct focus point and compose your scene so ...


5

The Nikon D40 is absolutely capable of delivering excellent portfolio worthy images. If you want to continue to use that body, I highly recommend sending it in to Nikon for a cleaning and a general checkup. If sand did enter any parts of the body, continuing to use it could just cause more issues. As another user pointed out, a great lens to start with ...


4

Nikon SB-600 is an excellent flash for the price (much cheaper than a SB-900) and I've been very happy with the performance of mine. If you're looking for TTL capabilties, then I've had decent luck with the Yongnou products and would probably recommend a YN-465 which is extremely reasonably priced (available on Ebay and Amazon typically). If you're fine ...


4

It sounds as if the problems related to the fall in the sand are confined to the lens. Try another lens, if you can afford it. The Nikkor 35mm f/1.8 DX is a "normal" fast prime on the D40, and Nikon is soon to release a 50mm f/1.8G that will autofocus with the D40.


4

There is a pretty good, in depth article about this at kenrockwell.com. Essentially, it tries to use the closest subject it can find without extra help from the photographer.


4

You can try covering the panel with Rubylith, astronomers use this a lot to dim bright display. It has a dark red tint to it so you'll still be able to see the display but it should seriously cut down on the eye glare and even retain some of your night vision. (Just some, it isn't perfect.) If the display has a dimmer on it, if you combine that with Rubylith ...


4

The camera is a bit 'elderly' these days, but the ISO range is usually determined by the native base of the sensor itself. However, most current cameras will do ISO 100 (and the odd one even less), but the limits are usually based on the technology at the time, cost factors, etc. For a more technical description, the ISO of a digital sensor is determined by ...


4

You cant create an HDR image from a single Raw file with any canera (since you can't magic dynamic range into existence) but you should be able to get the ultra contrasty tonemapped look from the D40 without difficulty. It's not the detail that matters for this it's the noise, and in favourable conditions (see next paragraph) the D40 is not noticeably worse ...


4

According to the manual for D40 the two-button reset does not affect custom settings (p38). The Custom Settings Menu has another Reset option to clear them (p74). pp113-114 describe default settings and what gets reset with various reset controls. There is also a tiny low-level reset switch next to the USB port (p108) -- to be used when the camera ...


4

According to DPreview it supports SD and SDHC cards. This includes all the classes of these cards. The classes only differ from each other regarding write speeds. Here is more information on that. As the D40x can not record video, a class 10 card is not necessary. A lower speed card is sufficient to take pictures.


3

No. No it is not possible to change the file naming scheme on the D40. Very few cameras can do that but many importing software can rename on import. Lightroom for example gives you lots of choices such as sequential numbering, date-time, etc. PS: stackexchange software says that I should use 15 characters at least to say no :)


3

I recommend the SU-4 mode if you are going for the cheap and manual. But, going with SB-800 or SU or SB-900 with any slaves working with TTL also has its wonders. A little out of the box suggestion, why not get a used D80? It's probably cost as much as a new SB-900 - but it has a built-in commander!


3

As you note, the D40 doesn't have an autofocus motor. Nikon's designation for the lenses that have the motor include the AF-I and AF-S lines.


3

A second hand 18-55mm can be obtained very cheaply. The later versions have Vibration Reduction (VR). Consider it an opportunity to upgrade, if you have some cash. When it first came out, Nikon couldn't make enough of the 18-200 VR to keep up with demand. It's probably a good match for a D40.


3

This is the solution for me: Buy and install the Delkin Pop up Hood that's made specifically for this model camera. It's actually a sun shade with a black cover for the LCD when not in use, but in about 1/2 second, you can pop up the cover to view the LCD if you desire. They cost about $12.


3

The D40 has the older version of iTTL, where ambient exposure and flash exposure are metered totally independently - no matter how well your flash lights up the room, the shutter speed is still set so that ambient light would be exposed correctly just as if there were no flash. Newer version of iTTL (starting from D3 and D300) will underexpose ambient when ...


2

This is highly likely due to the charging time of the flash. Depending on the camera, one of the following happens in manual (M) mode: The camera always fires the flash at full-intensity. The flash power is automatically set by the camera. Flash power is manually set between 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, etc of full power. For #1, you will get the full recharge ...


2

In my experience an f4-5.6 lens at 300mm is challenging to use, especially without VR. A tripod will certainly help, but hand holding was difficult for me in anything but very bright light. A potentially bigger issue though: Looking at the availble Nikon non-VR 70-300 lenses, I don't believe any of them are AF-S. This doesn't mean you can't use them, but ...


2

This is called Slow Sync, which is a technique that allows you to combine flash with an ambient light exposure. You probably turned this on by mistake. Generally, that's by holding the flash button (the one that pops up the flash) and turning the control wheel. Your manual is here, see page 47 (in the PDF, technically pg 35 in the actual manual).


2

Use ISO 100 and deliberately under-expose by two to three stops so that flash is the main source of light. Then you let the flash do all the work. Shutter speed in a sense becomes much less relevant because the picture is determined by the milisecond or so that the flash fires; thus, your shutter speed is the speed it takes for your flash to fire which is ...


2

I suggest using a fixed focal lens because they have a larger aperture (let more light in). Start with the 35mm 1.8 DX lens. Because you have a cheap body that does not have an AF motor you cannot use the cheaper AF-D lenses and have to go for the more expensive AF-S lenses. Of course you could use manual focus (AI) lenses, but the light meter on the D40 ...



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