Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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1

Yes you can do astrophotography in a humidity over 70%. In fact as an astro- photographer in England I would call 70% very low humidity. Problems can start occurring over 85% due to dew on the lens/telescope but a simple dew heater can solve that without much of a problem.


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my two cents: with high humidity, star disks in the photo are horrible! This is an example: http://www.astrobin.com/252070/B/ Picture looks ok but if you zoom you will see how orrible they are. This is not a focusing issue, it appears every time I try to make astrophotography with high humidity (> 80% reported by weather underground)


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In low light situations the camera will focus both faster and more accurately with a lens with a larger maximum aperture. Even when the photo is taken at a much smaller aperture, focusing is done at the lens' maximum aperture before the lens is stopped down. Thus the EF 50mm f/1.4 should focus faster than the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 (since f/1.4 is three ...


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If the room is going to be to too dark, increase your ISO range and lower your shutter speed to 1/80 or 1/100.if you have little light, change your ISO between 400 and 800 and increase the shutter to 1/125. It's advisable to use maximum aperture value to get bright pictures. Max ISO, F3.5 or <, S 1/100.



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