Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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44

I've only shot one, and that was with my Canon 350D with only a 17-85mm lens. Given that I didn't have a particularly long lens, I knew before I went out that I wouldn't be able to get any brilliant close-ups. What I decided beforehand was that some of collage was the most likely option for me. I ended up with just over 20 individual frames of the moon at ...


26

The trick is very easy, actually: bring your own lighting. The existing orange sodium-vapor lighting is missing important parts of color spectrum, so those colors will never be reflected from anything. Filtering will only further reduce the colors available for recording. The "good" examples in the question look very much like one would get with a couple ...


23

I've never attempted to photograph the Aurora Borealis myself however the following advice applies to most celestial photography: You will want the fastest (biggest aperture) lens you can get your hands on. The 50 f/1.4 is ideal, though the focal length is quite long for this sort of thing. It's good because it will let in about 5-6 times as much light as ...


23

I had exactly the same problem when I first tried to photograph the moon: all I ever got was an overexposed white circle. The answer is that the moon is much brighter than you realise. Also, unless you have a very telescopic lens, it's going to be pretty small in your photo. If you use one of the camera's automatic modes, the camera will try to get the ...


19

Body - you can get better high ISO performance from a full frame body, if you're willing to rent one. That's worth a couple of stops. Lens - another couple of stops if you buy/hire an f/1.4 or f/1.8 lens, especially if you're shooting at the long end of your zoom at f/5.6 Light - in the picture you've given as an example, you seem to be standing in the ...


19

Basically, you need to do some post processing on this image. From the original, the first step I performed was to make the darkest part black and the lightest white. That alone made a sizeable diffefence since your original lightest spot was only (.37, .34, .38). In other words, you were wasting over 60% of the dynamic range. Original: Black and ...


18

You've hit the diffraction limit. That link has some amazing answers with a lot of detail, so I won't be redundant, but in short, once the aperture gets to be below certain physical size, diffraction causes inevitable blur. For your camera (and any other camera with an APS-C-sized sensor), the limit is a little beyond f/11. The amount of light let in ...


18

Use the maximum aperture. Shutter Speed: Use the 600/(focal length * crop Factor) rule so as to not see the star trails in your picure (Refer here in section 3. Camera settings). For your 19mm lens you can go up to 20 seconds. Highest ISO possible for your camera that you find the images acceptable. You can use the application: Stellarium to find ...


17

I have taken a few years to perfect my moon shots. Many nights stood out in the cold!! On the months where the full moon is not obscured by cloud!! Here is what I do: You need a long lens! The moon may look large in the sky, but it will still be a dot in your viewfinder! Here is one instance where megapixels still count - as for the same reason above ...


16

This is a difficult problem as in general those orange sodium vapour lamps give you little to work with, but there are some options Lighting varies with location, it's probably the case that the lighting in the second two examples was better (more sources, broader spectrum), so move around and compare results. By careful editing you can sometimes get a ...


15

The colour of light is a strong visual cue that it is night time. Strong blues trick the brain and can make a well lit scene look like night. Making artificial lights extra warm (orangy) further enhances the contrast to the cool "moonlight". Lighting obliquely also seems to help as it suggests the scene is darker whilst maintaining details. Here is an ...


15

Some of the following suggestions will depend on your camera (I have a Nikon so I'm not sure about Canons). Rather than press the shutter button directly, try using a remote shutter release or alternatively there may be a timer function which delays the shutter - this will allow (at least some) vibrations to settle down. Look in your camera manual to see ...


14

I too am keen to see some more answers to this, in the mean-time here is my contribution: A tripod (or at least some sort of support) has got to be a "must have" for this sort of night photography: Reduced camera shake means sharper images Lower ISO settings mean less grainy images Longer exposure times can also give interesting effects (for example with ...


14

What you're seeing in that shot is overexposure. Unlike overexposure in a day time shot,where the blown highlights tend to go pure white, the red light from the sign caused overexposure in the just the red channel. Thus all the different tones of red have become 100% red and detail is lost. It can be fixed by reshooting at a faster speed / smaller aperture ...


14

Well, given that all I have to work with is a JPEG, the results are not perfect. If you have the original RAW, you should be able to do what I've done, and more (particularly in the deep shadows). I imported your photo into Lightroom 4.2, and made the following adjustments: Exposure: +2.0 Shadows: +100 Blacks: +100 Whites: +50 Clarity: +25 Vibrance: ...


14

Based on how the second photo looks, my guess is that it was extremely dark and that they took a flash photo with a bulb exposure and then tilted the camera upwards to create the trails from the only lights in the room (which would have been the audio gear). This would leave the DJ well developed since he is only exposed during the flash and then expose the ...


13

Firstly I notice your aperture is set at 1.8. This will make DOF very narrow, making focusing very difficult. Also your camera is very good at higher iso, so try using 1600 / 3200 initially. Try setting the following. Use auto focus to focus on something with a defined edge (the tops of the trees?), then switch to manual to keep the focus. Use a higher ...


13

Looks like there was some dust or watter droplets or whatever in the air and that they reflect the flash light. The effect is not very present but as your background is black you can see them. Furtehrmore as they are out of focus they appear as disc rather than dot (in fact you got nice bokeh)


13

Shoot with a small aperture, f22 or like. It is called diffraction. There is a detailed answer Here And here are some sample photos taken with Sony Alpha A35 and an old Carl Zeiss Sonnar 135mm f/3.5 lens. I choose this lens to experiment because it has six blades and has a nice octagonal aperture at f/22. And also being a lens from cold war era, it is much ...


12

The effect is called day-for-night and it's particularly common in old movies. It's often not very convincing. Often the best looking effects can come from artificial lighting. It's often characterized by a blueish hue - this can be achieved by white balance - and by underexposure. Boosting the contrast may help too. Sometimes, day-for-night involves ...


12

Photographing the moon in general can be difficult, as at any reasonably long focal length that will capture useful detail, the moon literally races across the sky. Using a telescope with a camera adapter will probably provide better results than a telephoto camera lens, however both are options. A telescope on a proper mount will likely provide much greater ...


12

Ok, so I totally misread the question. Bulb mode, get your exposure right for the stars behind. Once you have this, set the shutter open for the required time, put the lens cap on / something over the lens (you'll have to count the time, the shutter needs to stay open). Have your girlfriend stand where you want here, charge the flash and set it for the ...


12

Well, the gist is - it depends on how picky you are about trails. It will almost always start to trail immediately, but it may not be noticeable until a certain point. Additionally, forget normal exposure rules for astrophotography. It's generally about getting the most light in that you can. The odds of overexposure are pretty slim unless you're in a ...


12

Did you try asking the photographer? :) The EXIF data for the first photograph says: 459 seconds f/6.3 50 ISO 20mm focal length It also says that the camera model is "O" (just a single letter), so I don't know for sure how accurate that EXIF data is. It also means we don't know anything about the sensor size, so the 20mm focal length isn't very useful ...


12

You can very well take night shots like this with D5100. I'll explain from my experience when i took this pic. Time Timing is very important in city-light shots. You can see the deep-blue/purple color of sky in the example picture you posted. You get this color a bit after sunset (Twilight). Unlike other landscape shots, you need a clear sky. So plan ...


12

If you're using direct flash, then any flash should 'freeze' the action pretty sufficiently, but it may look like crap. I'd advise not using the auto sports mode - try to set the settings yourself so that you know what the camera should be doing. Switch to A mode, open aperture full up, ISO 800, but then set auto-ISO to go up to 3200 with a shutter speed ...


12

I initially marked this as a duplicate of How can I avoid star trails without an expensive tracking mount?, but on reflection, I think the answer here is simply the assumption in that one: to get a night-sky exposure longer than 30 seconds or so, you have to track the motion of the sky, and a fancy tracking mount is the way to do that. It looks (from the ...


12

With regard to reasonably bright stellar objects: technically, yes. With regard to dimmer objects like those that make up most of what we mean when we say "The Milky Way": practically speaking, no. In addition to the phase of the Moon, which determines the overall amount of light falling on the atmosphere above a specific location on the Earth's surface, ...


11

For your scenario: "downtown is in the background and person is in front" The approach that would give you a nice effect is combining flash with long exposure. Using flash will ensure that you have the main subject sharp and well lit and the long exposure will allow you to capture the background. You can use this method both with and without tripod. When ...


10

According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winston_Link) he used a total of 43 flashbulbs (wired to trigger simultaneously) for the shot you have as an example. Certainly the shot looks lit by flash. Looking at a higher resolution copy, I think at least one of the flashbulb heads near the tracks are visible in the shot.



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