Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

33

It's six. Remember, the stops are already logarithmic. That is, a 3-stop reduction (as from a 3-stop ND filter) is a 2³× loss of light — ¹⁄₈ of the light gets through. A one stop filter halves light, since 2¹ is just 2 (→ ¹⁄₂), and two stop filter is 2² (→ ¹⁄₄ the light). When you stack them together, you're adding the exponents, so 2³ stacked with 2³ is 2⁶ ...


32

I disagree with the sales person; it's two completely different things. Exposure compensation is used for making the image brighter or darker than what automatic exposure in the camera would make it. An ND filter is used for allowing a slower shutter speed without making the image brighter. If you would simply use exposure compensation, you would pretty ...


23

I see two options: You can stack ND filters. Sounds like you just need to eke out another stop or four, so your second filter doesn't have to be quite as extreme as the 9-stop filter you already have. By only having two filters, rather than 3, you should be able to reduce the vignetting a bit. It would help if your filters were the slim kind designed for ...


23

Filter Types There are essentially 3 kinds of GND filter: Soft, Hard, and Sunrise/Set. All these come in various 'strengths'. Soft GND filters have a gentle gradient from dark to transparent and so are good for landscapes with irregular horizons such as mountains, hills and to some extent buildings. Hard GND filters have a more sudden change between dark ...


22

ND filters Advantages No extra post-processing required. You can see the result in the viewfinder. Disadvantages Making the exposure is more complicated because you have to select a filter and place the transition appropriately for the scene. You probably need several filters (of different density and transition abruptness) to cover a sufficiently ...


22

A Neutral Density (ND) filter is a filter that reduces the amount of light captured by the camera evenly across the visible spectrum. As such, it looks grey to black (depending on the filtration power) and does not cast color on the received image (like blue or yellow, e.g., filters will do). When using a ND filter, there is a need to compensate for the ...


19

Firstly, what is a neutral density filter? "Neutral density" just means that the filter is a pure shade of grey: it shouldn't (if well manufactured) add any colour tint to your photographs. There are two main types of neutral density (ND) filters: graduated and non-graduated. Graduated ND filters are darker at one edge and lighter (usually completely ...


18

There are two ways to simulate a Graduated ND filter by software and they both have different disadvantages and advantages, compared to an physical filter: H/W Filter Pro: A H/W filer gives you results immediately which you can see while you compose. Con: On the other hand, the effect is fixed in gradation and shape. Software Effect Pro: Adjustable in ...


18

From a functional standpoint, yes, you could essentially achieve the same effect with multiple stacked filters as a single high-density filter (say a 10-stopper.) There are a variety of concerns to be aware of, however, regarding stacking multiple filters. Filter quality: The Lee "Big Stopper" 10-stop ND filter is pretty high quality glass filter There ...


15

As a general rule, exposure time depends directly on the amount of available light. So if you measure the time needed for some exposure at early dawn, it would probably be bigger than the time needed after the sun rises. Assuming you want to capture the atmosphere and colors of a sunrise or sunset, the amount of light would probably be too much for a really ...


13

I have also recently been researching the same subject. I'm a DSLR user, but there are many scenarios where shooting without an ND filter is just not possible. In my extensive exploration of ND filters, I've found Lee Filters. Both from a textbook technical perspective, and in reality, Lee seems to have the best filters available. Some of the things I've ...


13

I've been looking around for this information too! I finally found the answer (after stumbling across your question first) at this website. According to that page, the formula is: OD = -log T SN = 1 + (7/3) OD where T = transmission rate, OD = optical density, and SN = shade number. For example, shade #10 gives SN = 10, OD = 27/7, and T = 0.000139, or ...


12

I think your camera shop guy miss understood your intention. Exposure compensation is designed to compensate for the camera's light meter over exposing for very dark compositions, and under exposing for very bright compositions. You tell the camera "For this composition, I want you to measure the light, then add (or subtract) xx stops to compensate". ND ...


12

I think you can only get subjective answers on this, different things will appeal to different people. I'll give you my experience. I have a polarising filter on my main lenses rather than a UV. If it's low light, or I otherwise don't need it, I remove it temporarily, but it always goes back on. I use the polarising filter all the time, so I don't like ...


11

We can actually work this out using the information given to us by the metadata and the photo itself. This is going to be a rough science, but good enough to help choose a filter. Firstly, we have the exposure information in the photo's metadata. This tells us it was taken at f/22 for 105 seconds at ISO 100. Secondly, what does the photo itself tell us ...


11

There is very little advantage of leaving the ND on when it comes to still photography. Aside from offering a small amount of protection to the lens the filter will do nothing except increase shutter times. There may be a few cases where you really want very long exposures indoors. If you're shooting videos with your DSLR then it makes sense as your shutter ...


11

There is a point where lenses transition from being aberration limited to being diffraction limited. This means that peak sharpness will increase up to a point as you stop down but will then start to decrease again. If you don't care about depth of field then use of an ND filter is preferable to stopping down past this point. Of course ND filters aren't ...


10

There are 98 current models in my database which are known to use an ND filter. I do not think enumerating them would serve much purpose. Some manufacturers do not specify if an ND filter is used or not, so there are probably more. There are models of a variety of sizes but most are ultra-compacts, followed by ultra-zooms. Fuji and Casio have the most such ...


10

I would look into the Lee Filter Foundation Kit, based on the needs you specified. Lee makes a very solid, and less bulky, filter system similar to Cokin's, and it will more than adequately accommodate your need for LOTS of ND filtration, 100mm filters, graduated neutral density, and if you don't mind spending the money, glass and high quality glass (rather ...


10

For the ND's that use decimals (i.e. .3 .6 .9), each .3 is one stop less light that reaches the sensor. So, a .9 means a 3 stop deduction in light to the sensor. For the ND's that use a number (i.e. 8X), they operate under the power of 2 exponentially. So, an ND 16 is a 4 stop deduction in light (2 to the 4th power is 16).


9

The mechanism is likely a combination of a linear polarizer and a circular polarizer (which itself is a linear polarizer followed by a quarter wave plate). Thus the differences you can expect between high-quality and cheaper variable ND filters ought to be similar to the differences found among polarizers which include flare, vignetting, inhomogeneity, and ...


9

That is an exposure of less than 2 mins. You need an ND filter to be able to expose that long in daylight without overexposing. An ND400 will be sufficient for this, given a low enough ISO and small enough aperture. That is the darkest filter I own and I have used it for similar exposures in broad daylight.


9

The number associated with an ND filter is actually the denominator (bottom) of a fraction. So an ND2 filter should be thought of as 1/2 the amount of light being allowed through the filter. For example, setting the lens at f/2.8, and using an ND2 filter would make that an f/4 situation for a total of 1 stop difference. ND4 filter is allowing 1/4 the light ...


9

It's easy to lost perspective when referring to stops due to the fact that it is a logarithmic scale. When talking about ND filters each stop represents a halving of the intensity of incoming light. Like grains of rice on a chessboard it starts to add up very quickly. A 15 stop ND filter reduces incoming light intensity by a factor of 32,768. That's enough ...


8

Simple answer: no, ND filters don't increase dynamic range. In zone system, an ND filter just moves exposure of scene elements n stops lower. Everything that was in the lowest n zones captured without the filter, gets clipped off as black. I can think of two scenarios where an ND filter might increase dynamic range, but I wouldn't use it for that: low ...


8

Yes, that cross effect is common with all variable neutral density filters, especially with very wide angle lenses (12-17mm). You'll have to do some combination of zooming out or backing off the maximum density. I did some experimenting with a mid-range filter in the blog : Marumi ND2-400 Variable ND Filter Review. The effect was almost non-existent at ...


7

If you are shooting digital, I recommend against GND filters. Shoot multiple exposures and composite them during post-processing. Although this takes more work, you are assured of better results - you are not limited by a linear gradient, nor restricted to working with a single take of the scene. Here is an example of this method rendered from 3 images shot ...


7

You will want a neutral density or ND filter. It essentially darkens all parts of the image giving you a uniform exposure that is darker then it would be otherwise. Depending on the camera, some have a built in ND filter, or some accept a filter accessory that you can screw on to the lens or drop into the filter slot. Personally I would buy a CPL(circular ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible