Incense

by Bart Arondson

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

A Neutral Density (ND) filter is a filter that reduces the amount of light captured by the camera evenly across the visible spectrum. As such, it looks grey to black (depending on the filtration power) and does not cast color on the received image (like blue or yellow, e.g., filters will do). When using a ND filter, there is a need to compensate for the ...


15

Firstly, what is a neutral density filter? "Neutral density" just means that the filter is a pure shade of grey: it shouldn't (if well manufactured) add any colour tint to your photographs. There are two main types of neutral density (ND) filters: graduated and non-graduated. Graduated ND filters are darker at one edge and lighter (usually completely ...


11

There is a point where lenses transition from being aberration limited to being diffraction limited. This means that peak sharpness will increase up to a point as you stop down but will then start to decrease again. If you don't care about depth of field then use of an ND filter is preferable to stopping down past this point. Of course ND filters aren't ...


10

I think you can only get subjective answers on this, different things will appeal to different people. I'll give you my experience. I have a polarising filter on my main lenses rather than a UV. If it's low light, or I otherwise don't need it, I remove it temporarily, but it always goes back on. I use the polarising filter all the time, so I don't like ...


8

I would look into the Lee Filter Foundation Kit, based on the needs you specified. Lee makes a very solid, and less bulky, filter system similar to Cokin's, and it will more than adequately accommodate your need for LOTS of ND filtration, 100mm filters, graduated neutral density, and if you don't mind spending the money, glass and high quality glass (rather ...


7

I've been looking around for this information too! I finally found the answer (after stumbling across your question first) at this website. According to that page, the formula is: OD = -log T SN = 1 + (7/3) OD where T = transmission rate, OD = optical density, and SN = shade number. For example, shade #10 gives SN = 10, OD = 27/7, and T = 0.000139, or ...


6

You will want a neutral density or ND filter. It essentially darkens all parts of the image giving you a uniform exposure that is darker then it would be otherwise. Depending on the camera, some have a built in ND filter, or some accept a filter accessory that you can screw on to the lens or drop into the filter slot. Personally I would buy a CPL(circular ...


6

I think a few of the existing resources on this website will already answer most of your questions. For example: Will Cokin-Z and HiTech 100mmx150mm filters fit on a Lee Holder? What is the highest quality graduated neutral density filter? Marumi ND2-400 Variable ND Filter Review What ND filter would you recommend? How do Cokin and Lee filter systems ...


6

At least with diffraction you can do full-frame sharpening since the softness is distributed evenly... Some disadvantages of an ND filter: An ND filter adds another layer of glass to the lens and will increase the chance of flare, depending on the quality of the filter. Strong ND filters on wide angle lenses can (because an extreme angle of view changes ...


4

The disadvantage to leaving the ND filter on is simply that whatever focus system is being used (phase detect sensor, contrast detect, your eye) as less light and therefore less information to work with. Live view uses the main sensor and thus has the advantage of being able to use hardware amplification of the signal when light levels are low. There will ...


4

Looking at the images in the flickr group that is mentioned in the link you posted, people are using shade 10 glass to produce 1 minute exposures at f/16, ISO100. This is the exposure time you would expect outdoors in overcast conditions if you were using a 10 stop filter, so I would presume that the shade numbers correspond exactly to number of stops of ...


4

Working from the Sunny 16, it is four stops between f/4 and f/16: 4 - 5.6 - 8 - 11 - 16 Assuming an ISO of 100, 1/100th of a second to two minutes is 14 stops 1/100 - 1/60 - 1/30 - 1/15 - 1/8 - 1/4 - 1/2 - 1 second - 2 - 4 - 8 - 15 - 30 - 1 minute - 2 minutes. Together, this will suggest you would need about 18 stops of density to get a 2 minute ...


3

The main advantage of the variable filter is that you can turn it so that it is at the minimum setting (letting the most light through). At that point it's about the same as having a normal polarizing filter, so should be easy to focus. Once focused, then carefully adjust the filter to darken to the desired density. In order to get long exposures in the ...


3

Other than the cumulative effect of each additional optical element placed in the light path with the resulting effect on overall image quality (i.e. sharpness, flare/ghosting, etc), the primary concern with stacking multiple filters will be vignetting. Since the EF 16-35mm f/2.8 L requires a filter to be weather sealed, the design would presumably allow one ...


3

Well, there are other reasons not to stack so many filters. First, with a full frame camera, you will likely run into detrimental vignetting fairly quickly...it wouldn't take more than a couple of standard (non-slim, which are not stackable) filters to cause several-stop vignetting. Vignetting aside, filters, even the best of the best, tend to be of lower ...


3

The item you linked to already has three product reviews on Amazon. I can't specifically comment on that one since I have never used it, but I have no reason to believe that it wouldn't be satisfactory for basic uses. It is a variable neutral density filter, which is a bit different then what you specifically mentioned in the question(since I think you ...


3

You can't, you are asking for the impossible. Regardless of price Vari-ND filters always show color-casts which vary in intensity across the frame. The stronger you dial it in, the more color-cast there is. A cheap one will have move oddities but even an expensive vari-ND filter still shows color casts. The color-casts are also such that they are extremely ...


3

Do you use more than one filter size? To me, that's the biggest reason for going with systems like Cokin P. I have numerous lenses, and they each have their own filter size. I would go broke trying to duplicate all my filters for all my lenses! Or, a different way of looking at it is that if you get a new lens that has a different filter size, for the cost ...


2

The third image looks like vignetting due to the thick Sing-Ray filter and your step down rings. But strange it's only in one corner - you don't have a hood attached do you? You should be able to see this vignetting through the viewfinder. Even a normal polarising filter is going to result in uneven skies with wide angle lenses, with the sides often being ...


2

I imagine you're getting the vignetting because of the large amount of things on the end of your lens - 2 filters and 2 step down rings. At least try removing the UV filter, but you might have to resolve to cropping or editing it out digitally. Try holding the ND filter all by itself in front of the lens, right up against the front element where it would ...


2

A large number of people, both amateurs and professionals, photograph and optically observe the sun regularly. The filters required are well known - a search on 'solar photography' will turn up many references. Be aware that if you get it wrong you can destroy your eyes or your equipment in moments. Looking directly at the sun will rapidly damage your ...


2

You might also want to consider the operational options when choosing between round screw-in or square: if you shoot a lot in very cold areas (probably not in California, but hey, you never know!), you may have trouble removing a round screw-in filter if you want a different effect. On the other hand, a square filter provides less lens protection in a harsh ...


2

Is there any difference? Yes. You will expose after filtration, allowing your sensor to collect the maximum amount of data. By applying a filter in post, you necessarily reduce the amount of data in your image. Does the difference matter? Your mileage may vary. I used to take a heap of filters with me, but now I only bring a few specialized ones: circular ...


2

One thing to consider is any other lenses you may own, now or in the future, may be larger than 58mm. Unless you're happy to buy other ND filters at the larger sizes, you may want to consider buying one large size (72mm or 77mm) and then using a step up ring. For example if you buy a 77mm ND filter, you buy a 58mm-77mm step up ring for this lens, and other ...


2

In quite a few cases ND filters can be a disadvantage. Filters cost money(especially high quality ones), they can appear in the frame, they require extra equipment(space, weight, time), they can introduce defects, etc. Another user has already pointed out why stopping down your aperture can cause problems. In reality, it is hard to image when one would not ...


2

A "color cast" can arise for a number of reasons quality control - cheaper ND filters (even the fixed ones) may be unevenly coated - I've seen reports that you can even see this if you hold the filter up to the light. I don't know that it's any particular brand, but rather some batches will be better than others. If you can buy from a shop where you can ...


2

With ND8 you are more likely to get something like a 1/64th second exposure in broad daylight. It is too weak for a 5 second exposure unless we are talking about extremes such as a combined very low ISO, very small aperture, and very overcast daylight. It depends on the ambient(existing light), the desired aperture, and ISO that you would like to use of ...


2

You already have the basics. You could add a few solid ND filters, even a 10 stop version is nice to have for special effects. Infrared cut-off filter or simply IR filters are quite popular for landscape photography but their use is typically limited and more specialty. Beyond that it gets even more specialty, into the filters for white balance and ...


2

Sunlight doesn't "drown out" colors, in fact it generally brings out truer color rendition than other light. Unclouded sunlight can produce stark shadows, which is just another way of saying that the scene has high contrast or high dynamic range. Assuming a reasonable sensor, this is a issue for post-processing. For full sunlit scenes you generally have ...


1

This article on the lens rental.com blog shows an extreme case of stacking a lot of filters. The image quality degradation is severe. http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2011/06/good-times-with-bad-filters For a one-time rental, I would not worry about it. If you find you need this radical level of filter often, I'd buy one that does exactly what you want. I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible