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28

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


17

Its better to scan the original slide/negative as its better to reproduce from as close to the source as possible meaning quality of reproduction goes down in this order: The source (whatever it was you actually were shooting) The slide/negative or digital camera file A print of the photograph. It essentially comes down to every stage of recording ...


16

In theory you can get more out of a negative than a print. However, in practice you are more likely to have access to a flat bed scanner that can give a wonderful scan from the print. A good film scanner is much more expensive and slower. Considerations are similar for larger format film. But the costs go up even more, since the consumer-level film ...


14

Here is where I'm at on this problem, pretty close I would say, short of looking around for a professional negative scanner. Flatbed scanner, lid open @Rafal first suggested I have a look at Alexey Alexeev's "Scanning Wet-Plate Collodion Ambrotype or Tintype Plate" on YouTube. It certainly looked promising. Alexey's photos are great by the way, check his ...


13

Yes, pretty much all image editing applications include Invert as a standard adjustment and will automatically apply it to the active selection (if there is one). Here are a couple of examples. Windows: Paint.NET Paint.NET is a great free image editor for Windows. Make a selection From the menu, pick Adjustments > Invert Colors Linux/Mac OS: Gimp ...


7

You're be looking for the Sabatier Effect. Sabatier discovered that when a plate was exposed, developed, and washed but not fixed, it could be given a second exposure to light which would partially reverse the image when development was continued. The technique can be used on film or when printing but is more commonly used when printing as the effects ...


7

Once you have the negative you use an enlarger to create your prints. An enlarger has a head containing a bulb, a negative holder and a lens. The head is on a column attached to a base. You can raise the head away from the base to make the image larger (or turn the head to project the image onto a wall for large prints) If you want to do a contact sheet, ...


5

Most photo editing software (though generally not raw processors like Lightroom) has the ability to select parts of an image and to perform operations on that selection, and most software has the ability to make a photo negative. If you want something freely available I suggest GIMP. Photoshop and Photoshop Elements will also do it but they cost money.


5

I remember my father dealing with glass plate negatives. In fact we even coated glass plates and took photographs with those fabulous old cameras. But back to your query, I certainly cannot say which is the best method, but the method he used was simply to get into the dark room and either make a contact transfer or enlarge. The contact transfer has the ...


4

Looks like photo.net has a really complete answer: Why do negatives need an orange mask? The simple answer is "impure dyes." This is generally true of all chromogenic photographic materials, where the dye molecules are made of a color coupler that is built into the emulsion, combined with the by-product of the development of silver by a color developing ...


4

If the TIFF files are only 8bit and the resolution is the same then there will be very little (unless the JPEG compression is set very high). The only difference will be slight artefacts in high frequency areas and potentially lower colour resolution if chroma sub-sampling is used on the JPEGs. Additionally if the scan resolution itself is high compared to ...


4

The process involves the following steps: Remove the film from its roll(s), load it onto reels, and insert the reels into their tank. This must all be done in the dark. (Good to practice on some old ruined film so that you can learn to load the reels by touch.) Once the cover is on the tank, you can turn on the light. Pour developer solution into the tank, ...


2

As said here, the original source will always contain a better quality. But you also have to consider that, the negative is smaller and you need better equipment in order to capture that, with better resolution and better optics. Your scanner may be able to capture more than 2000dpi image, which will give you a lot of pixels even on a inch big negative. ...


2

I've been looking at the same challenge. Some 2000 glass plate negatives from Edwardian times. 1/2 plates at 120mm x 160mm with some degradation of the emulsion. A lightbox and my D200 with portrait/macro 60mm lens would be optimal, but too time-consuming - I'd be doing it to 2020 and beyond. I scan the image on a Epson V750, emulsion side down, at 2400dpi ...


2

The classical solution is to use an enlarger, which projects the image from the negative on to photographic paper, which then must also be developed (same steps as film - develop, stop, fix, wash, and dry, just using different chemicals). B&W is definitely easier to handle in this regard, since you can use a safelight to see what you're doing (B&W ...


2

It's always better to scan the original material: the negative contains much more information than the print does. Can you capture that information? A film scanner can. My experience (5+ years ago) is that a flatbed with transparency adapter does not do anywhere near as good a job capturing detail in the negative as a film scanner can. A flatbed captures ...


2

If you are shooting monochrome film (B&W), it is reasonably easy to build your own darkroom and develop your film and make prints. With color films it gets much more complex. Different types of color film require different processes, and getting good results requires everything, including the temperature of the chemicals you use, to be almost perfect at ...


1

The color channels are not properly aligned, so you need to break the image into color channel layers, information on how to do that can be found here. Then you can independently align the channels and remix.


1

With the data you provide: the files are much larger more expensive it's a service they chose to provide We can assume that the TIFF format used is less compressed and higher bitrate - most likely 16bit lossless, or the service is really pushing it. And they offer this service because the bitrate of the scanner is above 8bit, so they want you to take ...


1

Another way of making a print from a negative is to scan the negative then print digitally. You may think I'm being flip, but for years that was my setup while I was waiting for full frame 35mm sensors to get good enough at a price I was willing to pay for. Until then, I walked around with a film camera, had just the film processed, scanned the negatives, ...


1

When you make a contact sheet, you physically place the negatives on the print paper and just turn on the light in your enlarger. The film is contacting the paper, hence the name. Once its exposed, you have to develop, fix, and wash the photo paper. Typically you develop the contact sheet and pick out best shots for enlargement. Then you put individual ...


1

I haven't developed film yet, but I definitely plan to do so. But I have no intention of printing in the dark room. I would just develop the film, scan the negatives, and prepare the final image in software. And I think this is a good place to start and get a hold of before learning the printing as well. Maybe you end up finding out that shooting film ...


1

That depends on the print. Is the print just a simple print, or has processing been applied, e.g. filters to enhance contrast, burning, dodging, etc. Then I would suggest that you scan the print, if this is the version you like and want. Otherwise, I would scan the negative. E.g. Had I an Ansel Adams negative, and the corresponding print, I would ...


1

Assuming that there are no technical issues with the scanners I would go with the negative. Any print will have some level of interpretation in it in terms of how colors map from negative -> print. So in effect you can do negative -> scan or negative -> print -> scan the first seems better to me. Of course if you don't have a negative scanner using a print ...


1

Just doing the same thing with my grandparents Kodak slides from the 1950's. I have an Epson 4990 Pro Scanner with 3 programs, Epson Scan, VueScan Pro and SilverFast 8 Ai. I found the Epson gave the best scan, but not good enough using Dust filter or ICE. Silverfast was so dark I couldn't see the photo. So I went and bought a professional Lightbox, used my ...



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