Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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15

If you're talking about the traditional slide viewers, they don't. The slide is a positive colour slide, all a slide viewer can do is shine light through a slide. If you put a negative slide, or a standard 35mm negative into the slide viewer, then the negative image will be projected.


13

I started with (color) negative film then switched to slide film for one specific reason: I wanted control over my pictures. With negatives, unless you develop and print yourself (which is a convoluted process for color film), when you drop your film at the local shop, you have almost no control over the look of your prints (exposure, contrast). And with ...


12

I would say TIFF is probably the best format. JPEG 2000, like JPEG, is still a lossy compressed format when you really try to save space (the lossless version can compress a bit, but not nearly as much as the lossy form, and some forms of the "lossless" wavelet compression still can't fully reproduce the exact original image.) When scanning in an original ...


11

Film is not brighter, it has different tone curve. In your examples highlights and shadows from negative are translated differently to the print than digital. With traditional films like the HP5 the curve is S-shaped. Also, with the black and white example, each film has certain tonal response to different colors, your digital conversion to bw has a ...


9

When I made the 'final' switch from film to digital several years ago, here's the procedure I went through with all my slides and negatives (more than 50,000 frames in total): Digitized every single slide and negative at the highest level of quality available at the time. My intention from the start was to hopefully never to have to break into the physical ...


9

The longevity of developed photographic film is a variable. This depends on the quality of the processing. If the process is well done, the fixing step has gone to completion and there will be no unexposed, thus undeveloped silver salt crystals. If fixing is incomplete, these crystals will in time self-reduce and blacken. If present in quality, the ...


8

There is the potential for variations in many of these steps, but the first one that jumps out at me is that you used the same ISO, aperture, and shutter speed for both exposures. Also, answering your question in a comment on Rafael's answer, "The thing that bothers me is that the exposure meter on the analog camera was showing that the image is too bright ...


7

Reversal film has a smaller exposure latitude than negative film, so it's harder to expose correctly. Also, as there is an extra step from negative to print, a negative that is slightly under- or overexposed can be corrected. The extra step of printing negative images can also be used to control the contrast of the photo, by using papers with different ...


6

Most labs I've seen that do black and white processing call it generally D-76 processing, but they could use any number of other chemicals. HP5 is about a standard a b&w film as you'll find, so if the lab claims they do black and white processing, they'll be able to do HP5. Ilford's site has a PDF for all the development solutions and times that they ...


6

Haven't used it myself but have you seen Ansel Adams mention of it in 'The Negative'? The method he used was: Soak neg thoroughly in water Re-fix in plain hypo solution for "several minutes" 5-10 mins in Selenium/Kodak HCA solution mixed 1:2 (constant agitation) HCA Wash This produced about a one zone density increase in the highlights.


6

Long-term degradation of film depends on a few different factors including the type of material they were stored in, along with temperature and humidity of the storage environment. That said, from the four types of film most people are exposed to (pun intended), B&W negative and Kodachrome slide film are perhaps the least affected by age. B&W film ...


6

It appears you have an intermittent light leak that is reaching the film while it is wound tightly on a spool, possibly the take up spool inside the camera. The distance between the bands in your sample and the differences in intensity look like the same event caused all three at a time when the area with the darkest band was on top and the areas with the ...


5

In case you just want to view them, have a look at http://petapixel.com/2015/03/22/how-to-turn-an-ipad-and-iphone-into-a-negative-film-viewing-station/ for a quick solution (of course, you can use other light sources, etc., but the general idea is the same). For positives, there used to be dedicated slide viewers and slide projectors, but mostly for smaller ...


5

Looks like photo.net has a really complete answer: Why do negatives need an orange mask? The simple answer is "impure dyes." This is generally true of all chromogenic photographic materials, where the dye molecules are made of a color coupler that is built into the emulsion, combined with the by-product of the development of silver by a color developing ...


5

The first hit I get on google for Tri-X 400 Pan tells me: KODAK TRI-X Pan Film has been replaced by KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X 400 Film / 400TX. The second hit is about Pro Tri-X 400, and that says: Compared to KODAK TRI-X Pan and KODAK TRI-X Pan Professional Film, the newer TRI-X 400 and 320 Films may have a slightly different retouching “...


5

"Best" is a relative term, depending on your goal(s). :) If you want the most flexibility (control over relationships between density, contrast, shadow and highlight detail), scan the negative and manipulate it in post-processing. The higher bit-depth you can get, the better for smoother gradations if you'll be making big adjustments in post. If you're a ...


5

There is some latitude with regard to ISO sensitivity. Digital cameras often are less sensitive than the rated "base" sensitivity. The manufacturers tend to round up because it can make test results look better than they actually are. With film the manufacturers tend to round the sensitivity down. With either film or digital the response curve from the ...


4

There are massive differences in film developers & techniques. You have a large topic to cover, my friend. Back in the day, film development was the most important step in getting good prints. It's also really freaking hard. If you are serious about learning about film development, then at some point you should start trying the various Pyro formulas. ...


4

Cold reduces reciprocity failure, and is used particularly for astrophotography. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photographic_hypersensitization#cite_note-15. My own experience with Kodachrome (RIP) was that very cold weather reduced the blue-green cast of nighttime skies and cityscapes. Note that this could lead to frostbite, by the time the camera is ...


4

If you load a roll of film into a camera, the leader will be fully exposed and will be black upon developing. You can pull a bit extra out of the roll. Or in sunlight you can take a few shots at the longest exposure time (or in bulb mode for say 30 secs) and that should produce black. Or if you don't have a film camera, just pull a length of film out in ...


4

Not sure of your location, so can't really offer any specific stores/services, but developing/printing a roll of film is typically around $10-15 USD at a typical (chain/non-specialist-photo-lab) in the US. I'll bet you could negotiate a cheaper price with the manager of a specific store for 100 rolls at once. Prices usually include developing, so it may be ...


4

They could simply not have the scanner calibrated, or they have some arbitrary values. You need to analize the negative and check if it is really that overexposed. But also take into account that even between film manufacturers the look has diferent results.


3

If you are using Lightroom 4 or greater, you have access to full RGB curves. These are fully featured curves, just like you might find in Photoshop, so you should be able to apply an inverse color negative reversing curve to the RGB curves, then switch back to the standard tone curve and have the ability to edit your inverted negative with your standard ...


3

This kind of issue is usually given by some dust in the calibration area in the top of scanner plate. A first try you can do to confirm it is to try to clean carefully that part and see if there is some change in the stripes pattern. It shouldn't be cable related because the data are digitally transmitted and loosing of data didn't produce this effect but ...


3

I've been trying to do a simple conversion of a black and white negative, and Tone Curves in LightRoom 4 seemed almost impossible to invert. I've known how to do this for years with Photoshop, but this morning found it a complete pain in LightRoom 4 until I figured it out. Google and YouTube were no help The answer: Go to Tone Curve. Below the box with the ...


3

The image looks like it could have been done in-camera, if the camera had a multiple exposure function. If the camera was tilted down for the first exposure, level for the middle exposure then tilted up for the last, you would achieve the stepped gradient effect we see here. The model looks to have been photographed against an evening sky (or sunset), and ...


3

You can get a good overview of film sleeve properties from filmguard.com The key precautions are to store your films in a cool, dark, dry place. One way of doing this is to store your film in a sealed plastic box containing a layer of desiccant such as silica gel. Rent a safety deposit box at your bank and store the box there. Good banks have climate ...


3

Yes, you can re-wet the film. If you do, make sure it is submersed long enough to be fully wet. Then dry it just like you would freshly developed and rinsed film. That means dipping thru Photo Flu solution as the last step before hanging to dry. Of course the drying area needs to be as dust free as possible. Hang it somewhere air isn't blowing around, ...


3

Yes, as far as my knowledge goes, [1] and [2] aim for a maximum of captured and accessible dynamic range with a flat gradation (which can then in print be tuned for more contrast), while [3] aimes for a steep gradation curve that might be harder to print (because of the higher density) and may result in thicker grain and loss of tonal range due to the high ...



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