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25

We've moved into (in my opinion) a more philosophical question with art and photography. To answer this, you need to figure out what is your definition of "good photographic vision?" How do you measure the artistic value of a photograph? To me, that is a very subjective question; much like judging any type of art is. I have had the luxury of visiting many ...


14

The question that you are asking is a very common one, but the answers are not as straight forward as you may think. How does a professional make the colors so bright, the contrast so well defined, the focus so perfect, etc ? Well, it isn't just one thing, ever. It isn't a single setting on the camera, or a single post processing technique or button. It is a ...


13

I would like to question your description: "just went there, saw the scene, clicked the photo and returned home". You could describe this way every possible human activity, and it also has a literary value (Caesar's "Veni, vidi, vici") but reality is a bit different. To just "go there" he had to walk around, in search, spending maybe hours. One cannot ...


12

I'm not nearly anywhere I'd like to be with my photography, but here are the things that have helped me on the way: Books, both educational and "picture books". On educational side I'd recommend "The Photographer's Eye" by Michael Freeman and Freeman Patterson's instructional books. I can now also recommend Michael Freeman's "The Photographer's Mind". ...


12

Portfolio. Build it. Make it better. Repeat. Don't worry about all this other stuff you mentioned. Seriously, no one will take a second look past your portfolio if it isn't excellent. Specifically you asked "how does one start out to become a landscape photographer". The basics are not websites, social media, marketing, etc. The basics are great photos ...


11

If I've understood your question, then you are asking what it is that a photographer contributes to a beautiful image besides the good fortune of discovering a beautiful place. Let me list a few things: She went looking The photographer may have invested time, effort and possibly money in locating a beautiful scene. Perhaps this isn't the case, but ...


10

From personal experience, I recommend the following camera body: The Canon EOS 7D. I say this for four main reasons: It is an APS-C crop sensor camera, which in Canon terms gives you an automatic 1.6x multiplier, allowing you to get closer to your subjects. 19-point advanced Auto Focus system. Fast 8fps burst rate, even with RAW. New (at the time it was ...


9

When shooting red flowers I usually have to tell the camera to underexpose from what it thinks is the correct exposure. I don't know if the D5000 has separate histograms for red, green, and blue. If it does then you can use the red histogram to make sure you're not blowing out the red highlights. Otherwise you'll have to check the picture and on the camera ...


8

If you're a canon shooter, I'll second the 7D. I use it for most of my work, and it's great. I've also shot extensively with the 100-400, and Mike's note on it does a good job of explaining why it's a good answer for you. Having said that, I've retired my 100-400 and I'm now shooting a different set of lenses, and depending on what your kit already looks ...


8

Photoshop and Lightroom are photography tools, not Landscape photography tools or Portrait Photography tools, etc. Either will do fine for Landscape photography. Each tool has different strengths and weaknesses; many pros use both tools since they each excel in different areas. To decide which tool you need requires you to determine what you want to do ...


8

Look at the channel for weather here. I get an email to my phone for various weather presets I made. https://ifttt.com


8

I can't watch your videos at the moment, but if I got it correct they are timelapses of a plant growing while the environment doesn't change or changes very little. It gives the impression that the plant grows fully over a short amount of time, or the the plant and the environment move at different speed. If my assumption is correct, BBC did this for the ...


7

The 100-400 is an awesome lens for bird photography. it's my go-to lens, and I do about 90% of my nature work with it. Works well carrying it around and is pretty fast and flexible. I work with a crop sensor, primarily a 7d, and I recommend a crop sensor for bird photography for the magnification it brings. the 7D is a killer body for this use. When I'm ...


7

One thing to bear in mind that single biggest advantage of digital over film is the freedom to experiment. While, of course, you can experiment with film, the cost of developing the results of your experiments can be prohibitive and you have to wait to see if the experiment worked. For example, I started experimenting with water drop photography (not using ...


7

It is great that you know what you want to shoot and have a respectable budget. The issue with what you are asking is that you will not be able to satisfy all those requirements at any price. The most critical is that bird photography takes long lenses which are they also need to be bright when you want to shoot wildlife in low-light. Honestly, it's hard to ...


7

That's a complicated want list with things that are fundamentally in conflict. Here are what I think are the key thigns you're asking for: Canon Body landscapes and people (wide angle zoom) flowers and occasional macro-style shots birds and critters (big, powerful telephoto) Body $2000, lens $2000 (max, $1500 preferred). So, $3500 total. Lightweight. ...


6

So the other posts are correct in that the red channel is being blown, but what you really want to know is how to overcome the issue within the camera without post editing. The Nikon D5000 has the Picture Control System giving users the ability to customize image capture preferences. Six settings are available — Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, ...


6

You have to start by scouting locations. This means noting the orientation of the the scene, knowing how the light will fall at varying times of the day, what the light looks like in the various seasons and how the scene itself transform itself into during these various seasons. It takes years of "mind framing", note taking and imagination to develop a list ...


6

There is no one lens that can do everything you want because wildlife and landscape require almost the exact opposite lens properties. I have the 18-135 and I love it as a travel lens - but it's not a good wildlife lens. For wildlife you want a long focal length and fast accurate auto-focus, long lenses tend to be big and heavy so they aren't very ...


6

agreed. The first step is to be able to make consistently great photos, and then display them where potential buyers can see them. but there's no shortcut to the technical quality and vision within the images. My second thought on this is simple: don't. Just enjoy taking photos. Why? Because there are a zillion other people trying to get into the same ...


5

The key to great shots is often to isolate your subjects, so that you can make the shot as much about them and really bring out details. With animals this often means using a long lens, particularly for birds which can be small, high-up and far. There are exceptions and cases where you can get really close to animals, like in the Galapagos islands, but more ...


5

Photographer's Life in Graph (by Robert Benson) has been doing the rounds. It shows visually what you can expect as you develop as a photographer.


5

I'll take a stab at giving you some hints. Remember that nearly all photography stores will let you try out gear. This is key when selecting bodies and lenses. If you've researched and found 2-3 lenses you might be interested in coupled with a body or two, go to the store and check the combinations out. Maybe you will find that what seemed ok on the paper is ...


5

Except in low light at end/beginning of day it's not too demanding. Lens sounds good. Most whales are bigger than most birds (you'd hope) so 250mm is big enough as long as regulations and whale availability allow close approach. Whales move slower than birds so for most purposes the setup is not too critical and you can use smaller aperture to get good ...


4

I've played around with bird and insect photography and have found that (at least in north america), there are a few good sites for this: identify.whatbird.com - North American bird database that you can filter down and visually compare the subject to drawings and/or photos. bugguide.net - This one handles identification of bugs from the US and Canada, ...


4

When photographing birds, the ultimate goal is to get that "frame filling" shot, where the bird (or birds) cover the bulk of the image. To capture such shots, you need a lot of reach, however even with reach, you still need to get pretty close. As a general rule, 400mm is the minimum necessary to get good bird shots without having to get so close that you ...


4

A friend of mine bought his wife the 400mm as a birthday present since she's an avid bird photographer and she loves it. If it helps you to decide a little on what to get, here's her Flickr photostream to see some samples of what you can get out of it. She pretty much uses the 400mm and 7D combo exclusively now. As a side note, while you mentioned an ...


4

As mentioned by cmason, it isn't really about the type of photography -- but more your needs in post production. Lightroom provides assistance with managing, retouching and sharing images. It is designed around a RAW workflow, I'm not sure how well it works with a JPEG workflow. Lightroom also has a non-destructive workflow, any edits inside of Lightroom ...


4

I terms of composition, based on your examples, you seem to be trying to identify that pictures such as these are better with foreground elements and a 'beginning' 'middle' and 'end' portion. Take the first example, it's clearly a scene with much effort put into the shot. Its a lovely scene but the composition is ultimately little more than foggy trees. ...



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