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39

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture. I've only done one ...


20

You're right — Hugin works very well for this. This is from a series of pictures I took with a P&S Fujifilm camera at the Children's Museum. It's not an action shot except in the sense that all pictures of children are action shots, but the process is pretty much the same. Photo by me. Licensed CC BY-SA 3.0 in this size. The images were all hand-held ...


14

If you have Photoshop, you can create an image stack. This automatically aligns the layers, so this works hand-held, too. It's a nifty trick if you're shooting a static scene without a tripod and have some extra memory space. (I wonder if the auto-alignment would be fooled by star trails, as a significant part of the image will be moving in unison.) Here's ...


12

You have two excellent answers already, but as @Maynard has enquired about alternative techniques, there is another option if you have a flashgun with a stroboscopic mode: http://www.flickr.com/photos/javo_noso_comio/3414155008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/14643312@N02/4510423513/ This basically works by firing the flash multiple times during a single ...


11

An exposure is what happens in the camera from the time the shutter opens to the time it closes. 525 exposures basically means this happened 525 times. You can combine any number of exposures and some cameras have modes to automatically do that for you. With multiple exposures you can any one of: Panorama Stitching Exposure Fusion HDR Blending Focus ...


10

Note that this is called multiple exposures, not incremental. A good number of digital cameras of all sizes do this: Most Pentax DSLRs (K-5, K-7, K20D, K10D, K-r, K-x), the Pentax Q, all third generation Olympus ILCs (E-P3, E-PL3, E-PM1) plus the OM-D E-5, most mid-to-high end Nikon DSLRs (D300S, D700, D3X, D3S), the Canon 1D X, a number of Fuji ultra-zooms ...


10

The first generally known case of taking two different exposures of the same high dynamic range scene and combining the results was around 1850. Gustave Le Gray did it to render seascapes showing both the sky and the sea. Le Gray used one negative for the sky, and another one with a longer exposure for the sea, and combined the two into one picture in ...


9

You can do it with a script for The GIMP. I did it a couple years ago, and got pretty good results. Remember to keep the time between exposures as short as possible, otherwise you will get visible gaps in the trails. That's why it's best to take a single dark frame at the end, and subtract that frame from the result (I had intended to incorporate that ...


8

Not the same camera in these photos, but the button Stan mentioned should be there in your Olympus too. Location of the rewind release button: ^^ The release button is right there, underside of camera, where the sprocketed axel is inside the camera. Small detention around the button. Keep the button pressed down while you cock the shutter. ^^ ...


7

A little bit of research goes along way... The image with the figure in the lower right that won the "people and space" category was not created from 525 separate exposures as the article claims, but one single relatively short exposure. From the photographer himself, via flickr: The setup was pretty simple... I found the foreground hill where I could ...


7

There's a free Windows application called Startrails that does exactly what you're looking for. If you've got Photoshop, there are ways to build Photoshop actions to do the same thing. Basically, you combine images in "Lighten Only" layer blending mode.


7

There is no real reason. Digital cameras could in theory cope with much more images. A number of models allow up to 9 but that is the most I've seen. The good ones allow you to confirm and retake each shot which makes this immensely workable. In any case you can do multiple exposures simulated yourself in most image manipulation software such as Photoshop. ...


6

Short answer: no. Longer answer: You can fake it, to a degree, with long exposures. In a nutshell, what you want to do start your exposure, expose the first part, then cover the lens with a dark cloth, reposition, and remove it to expose again. It’s not as precise, it’s more work, it works better at night, and it might not be worth it. That said, you can ...


6

Yes it is and there are several ways to do that. The easiest which works with any camera (still or video) is to split the video file into a sequence of stills using software like ffmpeg. Then pass the images to an Exposure Fusion software. While it was not it primary intention, Exposure Fusion works really well to blend images which results in lower noise, ...


6

It's very unlikely that double exposure could happen with a digital camera in the way it could occasionally occur unintentionally (and, often, intentionally) with film cameras. That's because there's no "film advance" mechanism in a digital camera. Each frame is read as a separate file, and there's no plausible way for them to get mixed up. If the ...


6

The short answer is: you can, if your camera has a feature to support it (see Which cameras have built-in HDR?) but really can't if it doesn't. "HDR", which stands for High Dynamic Range, is a little bit of a misnomer, because the end result is a photo with regular dynamic range displayable on a typical monitor or print, but which shows detail from across a ...


5

Well, its (the first image) definitely a composite photo (assuming he stacked as the article said...which it turns out he didn't and the article lied lol) - the foreground and the stars are not from the same set of exposures - so lets just focus on the star part. Use any method you want to put the foreground and background together. If you're stacking ...


5

I cannot speak personally for all models of Canon EOS cameras, but I do know that it's specifically not possible with the following Canon models: 1DmkIV 5DmkII 7D 50D 40D 20D Based on this pattern it'd be pretty easy to infer that the rest of the EOS line (and possibly other Canon lines as well) does not have this functionality. That is to say that it's ...


5

Yes indeed, in fact your first bullet point does that. By stitching a panorama you are simulating a larger sensor. The effect works best when you use a telephoto lens and create a multi-row panorama with approximately the same aspect ratio as a regular photograph. This is sometimes referred to as the Brenizer method (after the person who popularised the ...


5

Yes, it's possible. My Sony A77 and a number of recent Sony DSLR's have a mini version of this. They has a "multi frame noise reduction mode" (MFNR) that takes 6 photos sequentially and combines them. The result on noise reduction in high ISO/low light situations is very significant. Some comparative images here. It's really of most value at ...


5

The magic lantern custom firmware for the 5D2 offers extended exposure bracketing up to 13 shots, so you don't have to alter any settings part way through. The firmware is loaded from CF card and only lasts until powered down.


4

There are indeed differences, and the purpose of each is not necessarily the same either. Of the four, three do aim to improve your dynamic range in one way or another, however Multiple Exposures has other uses. To start with HDR, this is more of a post-process blending technique that merges multiple photos of the same scene to improve total dynamic range. ...


4

Astrophotographers have been combining similar images for years. This is called "stacking" and there is special purpose software for it. You have great reductions in both noise and in some cases, clarity, than could ever be achieved with a single exposure. However, there is a big but to this. The prime purpose of stacking is to eliminate noise from really ...


4

Since you're looking to do this with the built-in flash, the answer is a simple "no, sorry". Some other Canon models can use custom firmware which might be able to enable what you want, but not this one. I would suggest getting a very cheap manual flash which you can trigger by hand, if timing isn't vital. Or, at a higher cost, many non-manual hot-shoe ...


4

When photographic film and plates were used for astronomical imaging, it was common to produce a final image from a single exposure, which might last for hours. Digital sensors don't work as well for such long exposures, but make it easier to combine short exposures, which brings several benefits. I'll try to address both aspects below, though it is a large ...


4

Yes, you can. I have never tired it for clouds but I have for water falls. My usually way of operating is to use my in camera multiple exposure but doing it in Photoshop works too. For in camera set your camera to do n multiple exposures and allow it to figure out the auto gain. Shoot n pictures. Done For in Photoshop take your n pictures as normal. ...


4

Yes this is possible. Image stacking is also commonly used in star trail photography. Instead of taking a single hour long frame you could take one-hundred & twenty 30sec frames and stack them to get the same effect. Take a look at the website below for a tutorial on how to stack images for a star trail. It is the same process to stack any image. ...



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