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19

If you're not using a polarizer, try that first - it will often help to cut through some of the haze. Heres a link with an example close to what you want even: http://www.dslrtips.com/workshops/How_to_use_polarizing_filters/reduce_haze_deep_blue_sky.shtml


18

You need to shoot from an angle - if all the trees/signs are in front of you then they will all appear vertical in the image regardless of the slope. This is actually a well known illusion that gives rise to "gravity hill", a road which slopes downhill but looking head on in the absence of any visual cues the brain interprets it as flat/sloping up, which ...


8

In addition to using a polarizer, and maybe photoshopping your image I would recommend waiting for the right weather. Haze is often minimized after a storm or strong wind has cleared airborne particles. Look for high pressure immediately following a front. If the high sets in for too long haze builds up due to lack of wind. See also this question: How to ...


8

In addition to Matt's answer, if you can until the bottom of the hill is in sight you can also get an idea of slope without shooting from an angle. See, for a not particularly good example, the following taken from Flickr: Credit: Frans de Wit, cc licensed This obviously only applies if you're facing downhill.


7

Two of the lenses I would consider would be either the EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS or the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS. The 15-85 is lighter and covers a wide range of focal lengths. The 24-105 is built like a tank and covers a range of longer focal lengths. If you intend on taking mostly long range pictures, the EF 70-200mm f/4L IS is the way to go, but it is a ...


6

Assuming you are shooting digitally, a polarizer should be all the filter you really need. This can reduce contrast in the scene my making the sky darker, depending on the angle of the sun. It will also reduce glare from the snow. You may also consider a solid ND filter if you wish to do long exposures. You can do this to include climbers are night as they ...


6

Shoot sideways. Certain things are most often vertical, regardless if they are on a slope or not. So, I would shoot the slope at an angle so that you can see the slope and those naturally vertical objects. In your example, the trees and road-signs should be vertical (although I know in some extremely rare occasions they are not which cause an ...


5

Despite the wide use of wide angle lenses (sorry no pun intended) for landscape photography, they are not the only viable solution for landscape photography. I highly recommend trying out a telephoto lens for landscape shots like this. With a wide angle, you bring in everything, both foreground, bright sky, and everything inbetween. A lot of times, these ...


4

I've been to the Sagarmatha National Park up to ~5500 m in autumn last year. I have a Nikon D90 and brought my ultra-wide angle, because I thought I need it. I didn't. It is way much too wide for the mountains. Everything gets very very distant with an ultra-wide angle lens like this. Believe it or not: I shot 90 percent of my photos with a fixed-focal 35mm ...


4

The contrast issue can be solved either with a gradual ND filter which will darken only the sky, or by simply using layer masks in postprocessing to apply different tone curves to foreground, background and the sky. You can even join multiple exposures if camera's dynamic range is not enough. If you don't do this too much carefully, you might end up with ...


3

Here's my very quick try of what I described in a comment to @jrista's answer: Again, just a quick and dirty attempt. You should do it with more attention.


3

You might want to consider a yellow or warming filter on the lens, and as mentioned elsewhere, take the picture into black and white if you can't control the colors. Ansel Adams worked a lot in this kind of environment (in black and white) and he actually used red filters at times to block out the blue haze. Another tip from Mr. Adams (not having anything ...


3

Given a couple of your problems are with color you could try removing that problem from the equation and see how it looks in B&W or IR. The foliage in the foreground could look good in IR and either way with some dodging and burning you could get some great contrast in the foreground, mountain and sky.


3

I would also consider enhancing the composition. Maybe use a longer focal length to compress the perspective. If you want to stick with the wider angle maybe try to make the foreground more interesting. The bushes in the foreground are currently very repetitive and take away the attention from the mountains. Maybe try to find something that frames the ...


2

Well there are two ways you can go. On the cheaper, but (relatively speaking) lower (but still good) quality you can look at things like GoPro which is designed for being highly portable and durable. It has limited functionality, but can be easily mounted to a bike for example and shoot decent video or basic photography. You can also look at ruggadized ...


2

Requirements we know: 1 Lens(prefers zoom) Weight "restricted" Canon 60D body "Best" lens desired Requirements we don't know: Subject matter Exact weight restrictions If a body other then the 60D can be used What "best" lens means to you Options: You could look at everything from a high quality prime such as the Canon EF 35mm f/1.4 L USM Lens, to ...


2

The Ricoh is not weather-sealed. Might run into two problems: "Drowning" the camera and having condensation in the lens that might cloud your photos. Condensation will not be as heavy as to ruin the camera itself. The issue with condensation happens normally when the air is very humid and if the outside temperature changes much faster than the camera ...


2

You can get good results reducing haze by playing with the unsharp mask filter in the image editing software of your choice (Photoshop, GIMP, etc). Try using a small amount with a large radius. You may want to use a selection to apply this only to the sky area if you find that it affects the foreground in a way you do not like. It's not a magic bullet but ...



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