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12

In this particular case, I'd probably tackle it with lots of cold coffee, a big roll of paper towels, and a very big box of those cookies. Couple that with some real patience, a partner or long cable release, very fast shutter speeds (given it is outdoors, it'll be the shutter that freezes the moment), and several exposures in sequence. Putting those ...


10

A sufficiently fast shutter would do it, but that also may very well not be a satalite photo. Google maps also uses arial photos and the detail of the plane in the photo seems too high and the plane too large in comparison to the ground for it to be taken from space. My guess is that the photo was taken from another plane, probably moving in a similar ...


8

Do the math. Let's say the plane is moving at 200 MPH, which is a plausible value right after takeoff or right before landing. Note that the flaps are extended, so one of these is the case. 200 MPH is 89 m/s. There is some blur. I'd say about 250 mm or less motion of the plane during the picture is about the limit that picture is showing us. That would ...


7

They're not gone completely, they are there with blur, but the effect a moving object has on the overall exposure is so small that we can't see it any more. You could simulate this effect in Photoshop or other editing tools. Create an image with a black background and put a white dot or mark in the centre and apply increasing amounts of the motion blur ...


6

Photos kind of similar to this can be achieved using a tracking shot where the photograph is taken from a car in front of the car being photographed, however in this particular case the answer is CG and/or heavy Photoshop. Particularly for the second image, there is no way to viably get that shot sharp without having the background also sharp. On the ...


6

The camera records light reflected or emitted by the scene being photographed. While the shutter is kept open during exposure, the camera accumulates light hitting the sensor as per the selected sensitivity and aperture. Now, thinking about the camera recording light, you can consider what happens to different parts of the scene: A stationary object: The ...


5

For high speed work I would look into the Paul C Buff Einstein. From the guy behind Alienbees, this strobe was specifically designed for high speed work. Unlike most monolites utilizes tail-trimming whereby power to the bulb is cut after a certain duration to reduce power. This effectively means the lower the power the shorter the flash duration. Other ...


5

Ignoring artificially increasing the light (flash, bounce cards, etc): Exposure = Shutter + Aperture + ISO You only factored in shutter and aperture. Your best bet at this point is to shoot RAW and increase ISO as high as you can tolerate. Depending on your camera, this may be anywhere from ISO 800 - ISO 12800. You can always try to reduce the noise later ...


3

Sorry guys, it's all manual masking out unwanted movement and "ghosts" shot by shot.


3

It is my understanding that the more experienced photographers in this area use sound triggers such as the Nero Trigger, TriggerTrap, or PhotoTrigger. They typically are just simple microcontrollers that can be triggered by a variety of different things, such as sound. They also allow you to setup a delay typically so you can capture the perfect moment that ...


3

You can decide how DIY you want to be. If you do not understand electronics, doing it all by yourself is going to be a bit of a stretch. That said you can buy it or build it (from a kit) using Trigger Trap.


2

As AJ Henderson has said, a fast enough shutterspeed is the answer. To put some numbers onto it - shooting at an airfield, if you have a King Air 350 coming in to land, you want your shutter to be around 1/320s or slower for propeller spin in the image, as otherwise you freeze the propeller in mid air. A propeller also spins quite quickly so freezing a ...


2

As John Cavan said, however I would substitute the cookie being dropped with a small stone, that way you dont waste them and get coffee full of bits. I dont think you would get a splash that size, from biscuits the size of the ones in the photo either.


2

If increasing ISO leads to unacceptably noisy images, you can also upgrade your equipment carefully. A fast lens in the f/1 to f/2 range can take in more light at the expense of shallower depth of field. A camera body with a larger sensor size (such as a 35mm sensor) will capture more light and so (typically) go to higher ISOs with less noise. Powerful ...


2

If you'd like to take pictures of people riding them then you need to read up on panning. By panning you can actually capture some sense of movement, the problem when there's no movement you can end up with either an odd sort of pose or the it'll feel a bit flat.


2

Quite a few things going on here. I'll go over a few items that will help get you images such as this, but the questions you are asking could fill a book, so I'll keep it high level. These images were created with a lens that is capable of a large aperture, such as f/1.8 that is found in the Nikon 50mm f/1.8 lens. That blurs the background, and actually ...


2

As with any panoramic photo created by a standard camera and lens you will need an amount of overlap to achieve a seamless final product. In many cases I use about 1/3 of the image as an overlap to create a final image. You might be familiar with an option that Adobe Photoshop has to stack images and remove parts of the image that are unwanted. It does ...


2

Both of these appear to be Computer Generated (CG) graphics, which are often used for video games and movies. In the movie industry they call it Computer Generated Imaging (CGI) and it is now the norm, rather than the exception, for generating special effects. The sharply defined edge of the shadow in the second image gives it away. It would be ...


2

They are called tracking shots, the only way to do them is to shoot from the back of a moving vehicle that drives in front of the vehicle you are photographing. That way the subject will be sharp as it is travelling the same speed as the tracking vehicle. I can't speak of the veracity of those particular images (there has been a lot of editing regardless), ...


1

You could go read up about the cameraAxe. Its arduino based. You can buy it completed, or the parts, or get the plans and do it all yourself. Pick the choice that matches your skills with electronics and fabrication. Its fairly priced for what it does. http://www.cameraaxe.com/ You can use anything you are smart enough to connect as the trigger. It starts ...



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