Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

The shaking can come from: Shutter button being pressed The mirror in the camera (unlikely) Tripod shaking (if the tripod is weak to support the camera) Or it may be related to the flash, is it used outside the socket? It may be causing some balance problems. I think that the shaking might come from the first one, but in case you're already using a ...


-1

First, there is no motion anywhere in the picture, so this rules out the shacking of the tripod or the camera or the table or an earthquake or what else: yes, there strange lights here and there, but if something had really moved you'd have seen it into the entire picture, not just few areas. That said, those are Vacuum tubes (from JJ Electronics, but I ...


1

Your question is confusing, because, I have no clue what is that you are photographing. with an initial flash I gess that "Initial flash" is exposign the bell shaped thing, the column, and the logo. That is why it apears frozen, without moving. Some answers are asumming the tripod stayed still because the bell is sharp, but that is because of the flash....


1

Are you using a filter, even a UVA filter? It looks very much like reflections you often get in dark scenes,where bright objects actually reflect off the primary lens element, then off the back of the filter glass. If you are using a filter, try removing it from the shot. Being this close, there is little separation between the object and reflection, while ...


2

If the room is dark enough then it could well be that either the camera or certain elements of the scene are moving. If the flash is the only illumination bright enough to expose everything, other than the LEDs and the reflections/glow given off by the LEDs, then even if everything were moving the very short duration of the flash will freeze what is not ...


2

Are you using the mirror lock-up feature for this shot? If not, it's possible the motion of the mirror in your camera is causing an initial vibration, resulting in the blurring of the LEDs vacuum tubes. Try the same shot again, but using the mirror lock-up function of your camera. Edit: New theory. I don't believe there are any LEDs in the image. There are ...


2

I do not think your tripod or table is moving, the solid items in the photo are stable and sharp. What your seeing is most likely related to the light from the LED's reflecting or refracting off glass or reflective surfaces during the long exposure. or even off dust or smoke. Try the same shot with the LED's off to prove or disprove this.



Top 50 recent answers are included