India Point Park

India Point Park
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28

The key here is how much light will be hitting sensor during flash, and how much during the rest of exposure. The sensor does gather light during the whole exposure; all of it is blended into one static image. In case the ambient light is much lower, it won't have nearly as much effect on the total light that reaches the sensor, and therefore only surfaces ...


8

If you take a photo at 1/10 second without flash and the image is black, you have effectively "killed the ambient" with your shutter speed, the shutter duration is too fast (with your other settings) to allow enough light to hit your sensor to make an image. When you add flash, the flash duration is very, VERY fast, 1/1000 of a second or faster (depending ...


6

You're right, there are situations when flash won't freeze the action. It all depends on the relative levels of the ambient and flash illumination. If the majority of the light is coming from the ambient lighting, you'll still see motion blur with a slow shutter speed, because most of the light in the scene will NOT be coming from the flash. However, if ...


6

Use a flash with rear curtain sync and a long shutter speed. The long shutter blurs the background and the subject. However, at the end of the exposure, the rear curtain synced flash fires, which essentially adds a second exposure on top. The flash is significantly brighter compared to the ambient light, but due to its limited reach, it only hits the ...


5

A polarizing filter will probably cut out 2 stops of light, which would allow you to shoot at 1/200 instead of 1/800. Depending on your lens, you might be able to shoot at f/11 or f/16 and further reduce the shutter speed. You should get good prop blur at 1/125 or so. The problem with a CPL is that as you pan across the sky, or rotate the camera from ...


4

You can use a flash along with a long exposure to show both a clear image at some point in the action and blur during the smash. Take advantage of settings for flash timing at shutter open or close, and try it with stronger and weaker flash settings (or use a handkerchief over the flash). It's hard to recommend an exact shutter speed, though my guess is ...


3

There are some software packages which do this. Vladimir Yuzhikov's SmartDeblur and the much more complete ImageMagick come in mind as first free solutions but most probably there are other ones. The most common approach is the one which is the deconvolution based on the Wiener filter If you want to read more, there are also other methods for achieving ...


3

I used to live in a large city suburb and over time found some very interesting subjects to practice panning. I appreciate that these subjects are not high speed planes, but with the challenges of a suburban area, may provide some benefit and improvement for your next visit to an airshow or motoring event. Skateboarders, Roller skaters and Roller bladers ...


2

Mmmm... not really. Best I could do with Photoshop CC 2014's Filter > Sharpen > Shake Reduction.


2

Yes, to some extent. See also: Can anyone recommend *freeware* to reduce motion blur by deconvolution?


2

Unfortunately, no. Once taken, a blurred picture is composed by individual pixels disposed in a way that give this distortion effect. Some software algorithms are capable of reducing this effect when it is mild. They rely on a sort of automatic boundary recognition. Simplifying, when they see a difference in colors, they assume it is the edge of an object, ...


2

Panning isn't so much about how fast, in terms of feet-per-second or miles-per-hour, your subject is moving. It is more about how many angular degrees per second your subject moves relative to the axis of rotation of your camera. A car moving at 20-30 mph will move the same angular distance per second as a plane moving at 200-300 mph if it is 1/10 as far ...


2

The camera needs a specific amount of light to take a properly exposed picture. How much light hits the sensor is tied to two items: shutter speed and aperture. Shutter speed defines how long light hits the sensor and aperture defines how much light hits per unit of time. If you want to avoid blurry images you have to set a fast shutter speed as you've ...


2

I'd go with slow sync flash (i.e., flash and a slow shutter speed). 2nd-curtain so that you get follow-streaks, not leading streaks, and possibly stroboscopic mode (where the flash gives off regular period bursts at a given frequency, in Hz) to get individual moments through the movement. Rehearse, figure out what ambient you want vs. the flash. You may ...


1

I would not consider the example you are posting as a long exposure. It looks frozen, so in my opinion is 1/100s or faster. Yes, it is very grainy, so they are using a high ISO, and yes very large aperture. Again you need to test what kind of style you want. You must decide between the style and the capabilities of your camera. These "long exposures" will ...



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