Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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9

This was done using a long exposure (possibly 1/4 second) with a flash at the start of the shot, this illuminates and freezes the cookies and then you see them drop too. Most DSLR's offer this as "rear flash" (flash at the end) or "front flash" (flash first) This does appear to have been done with an off-camera flash/strobe, so could either be the result ...


7

Just a guess, but this is probably done with a strobe and a slow shutter speed. The strobe illuminates for a very short time, so everything appears stop-motion for the duration of the strobe. The rest of the time the shutter is open, much less light comes from the scene, but will have motion blur. The tricky in this is to balance the continuous lighting ...


6

Photos kind of similar to this can be achieved using a tracking shot where the photograph is taken from a car in front of the car being photographed, however in this particular case the answer is CG and/or heavy Photoshop. Particularly for the second image, there is no way to viably get that shot sharp without having the background also sharp. On the ...


6

A short shutter-speed is needed to freeze an object in motion. The faster the object, the shorter the shutter-speed you need. It also depends if the motion is close or far and its direction, so we cannot tell you exactly how fast a shutter-speed is needed. When buying a camera, you can look for the maximum shutter-speed of the camera. That lets you know how ...


5

There's nothing magical here. Your relative motion will be the speed of your train plus the speed of the object moving towards you. It depends on how fast both trains are going, but it's really the same as if you were standing still and the train were going past you. You need: A high shutter speed to freeze motion Incredible timing. A high burst rate is ...


3

Provided that the subject is in focus, two things can cause (motion) blur: Shake/vibration of the camera Holding your camera with a solid, steady pose will reduce the vibration. Choosing a high shutter speed will also reduce or even eliminate the blur caused by such vibrations. Movement of the subject A high shutter speed is required for crisp photo ...


2

The technique, sometimes referred to as dragging the shutter, is used to combine a short burst of strobe light with a moderately long shutter speed. The strong light of the strobe "freezes" the movement of items that also appear as blur trails due to the long shutter speed and the weaker ambient light. Front or first-curtain sync fires the flash as soon as ...


2

Well, either a fast shutter speed or you can match the angular velocity with a quick panning (takes practice). Here I was standing rather than moving in the opposite direction, but you get the idea:


2

Speed. You need to use a very short shutter speed to freeze motion. In order to use a short shutter speed, you need enough light, a lens with a wide enough aperture, and a recording medium, such as fast film or a sensor with high enough sensitivity to properly expose your subject when using a short enough shutter speed. In terms of still photography ...


2

Both of these appear to be Computer Generated (CG) graphics, which are often used for video games and movies. In the movie industry they call it Computer Generated Imaging (CGI) and it is now the norm, rather than the exception, for generating special effects. The sharply defined edge of the shadow in the second image gives it away. It would be ...


2

They are called tracking shots, the only way to do them is to shoot from the back of a moving vehicle that drives in front of the vehicle you are photographing. That way the subject will be sharp as it is travelling the same speed as the tracking vehicle. I can't speak of the veracity of those particular images (there has been a lot of editing regardless), ...


1

SHOOTING BOXING MATCHES- You can get acceptable images with a shutter speed of 1/320 although faster is better. Tomorrow I am shooting my third boxing match from the edge of the ring with a Nikon D7000 crop sensor. The boxing ring is somewhat dark being lit by a single overhead florescent strip. The challenge is getting enough light. On the first boxing ...


1

What setting is needed to click blur moving object and also clear fast moving objects? The setting you want to change is the shutter speed. This can usually be accomplished by putting your camera in a shutter-priority mode. You set the shutter and the camera figures out the rest. As the shutter speed goes up, so does how much you stop motion.


1

As others have mentioned, to prevent blur, you want a fast shutter speed. However, when looking for a camera, this is not actually a big issue - even my ultra-low end Sony a390 supports shutter-speeds of 1/4000, which is more than fast enough for most common moving objects (I'm assuming that you're not taking pictures of bullets mid-air) The real issue ...


1

The biggest thing is going to be shutter speed hands down. Without a fast shutter, it is going to be impossible to stop the motion in the scene. That said, there is still other factors that will help make a good quality photo at high shutter speed. A good autofocus that can follow a moving subject is critical unless the movement is going to be along the ...



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