Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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44

The Technique Stable Tripod is a must if you want to be able to compose. If you want exposures over 30 seconds, use Bulb mode, as most of the cameras only meter up to 30 seconds. Use small apertures, low ISO and add ND filters if there is too much light. You probably want your sensor to be clean also as small apertures will render the dust relatively ...


36

Stars move. Like with any other movement, what we care about is how much they move on the sensor during exposure: A movement that occurs only within a single pixel is not a movement the sensor can capture, i.e. the movement appears frozen. But when movement takes a point across several pixels during the exposure, it will be visible as movement blur, in this ...


30

Any speed will give you something. It will render the photo differently. So, the question should not be how slow can I take the photo? but how slow do I want to take the photo? Some ideas: If you want to freeze the sweat flying off the boxer's face when he takes a hit, I suggest 1/2000s or faster. If you want to freeze the boxer's body and leave the ...


28

The key here is how much light will be hitting sensor during flash, and how much during the rest of exposure. The sensor does gather light during the whole exposure; all of it is blended into one static image. In case the ambient light is much lower, it won't have nearly as much effect on the total light that reaches the sensor, and therefore only surfaces ...


20

The most common approach to taking great flowing water pictures is to use a long exposure. This allows the "soft, dreamy flow" of water to be captured as you have probably seen in many photos. Achieving a long exposure may require extra equipment, depending on how the scene is lit. Long Exposures To achieve a long exposure, you will need to reduce the ...


20

While you can get some freezing with speeds around 1/300 (see the first photo below), I would recommend going with faster shutter speeds if you want to take shots of water drops falling or moving away from wet dogs. One thing to keep in mind is that most flashes have a limit on their sync speed, which means that the use of flash will limit your fastest ...


19

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


17

The most important body features are: The max ISO levels (and the noise levels at high ISO) Low light shooting is much easier at high ISO settings, but many lower end cameras have trouble with noise as you increase the iso. A good indication of the high ISO performance can be found at www.dxomark.com by looking at their "Sports (ISO)" rating for the ...


15

Yes, you can tell what went wrong: out of focus (entire frame) This can be a problem because of close-focus, i.e., the lens and camera never did find something to lock onto before you fired and was focusing ahead of everything in the scene. Sometimes this is because your lens focuses too slow, sometimes it's because there wasn't enough light to provide ...


12

If the camera is on a tripod, and we assume little or no camera movement, then there are two possibilities. Most likely, at 3", your brother is not going to stay perfectly still and there will be some subject movement. You could fix that in part by using flash during the exposure to freeze the foreground subject. And also, it's presumably fairly dark, ...


11

There are different ways that you can shoot moving water: Freezing it, at about 1/100 s. A little movement, at about 1/10 s. Much movement, at about 1 s. Foggy, at about 10 s. The best time for each effect of course varies a bit depending on the scene, and the focal length. A polarising filter has great effect on water, as light that bounces off water ...


11

The short answer is: use a long shutter speed. To control this, put your camera into Shutter Priority mode (indicated by a "S" on the dial" and adjust the speed to a relatively long time - perhaps a half a second, a whole second, or perhaps longer. The longer answer for when it gets tricky: You might find that during the daytime, things are so bright that ...


11

The rule of 600 states that to 'eliminate' star trails the exposure time in seconds should be 600 divided by the focal length of the taking lens. 20mm lens could go to 30 seconds, 300mm lens could go to 2 seconds. Of course (like any motion blur) you will never eliminate star trails- you merely reduce the trail to an acceptable level for a given ...


10

That depends on how fast the object is moving, and how far away it is. From that you can calculate how fast it's image is moving across the film/sensor plane. It all comes down to having a shutter speed that is so fast that the image of the object doesn't have time to move across too many picture elements (film grains or sensor pixels). So, for objects at ...


10

To extend the shutter speed in daylight use the following ... Lowest ISO possible to slow down the sensor sensitivity Smallest possible aperture to reduce light coming in (use aperture priority) Use Neutral Density (ND) filters that reduce the amount of light entering the lens without changing the colour balance. I use ND8 which slows down the exposure by ...


10

A sufficiently fast shutter would do it, but that also may very well not be a satalite photo. Google maps also uses arial photos and the detail of the plane in the photo seems too high and the plane too large in comparison to the ground for it to be taken from space. My guess is that the photo was taken from another plane, probably moving in a similar ...


9

The freezing of motion has more to do with the duration of the light than it does with the speed of a shutter. Obviously, with a continuous source of light, the only way to reduce the duration of it is with your shutter, but when you do control the light, that's a very different story. The technique I use to freeze the motion of something like water ...


9

This was done using a long exposure (possibly 1/4 second) with a flash at the start of the shot, this illuminates and freezes the cookies and then you see them drop too. Most DSLR's offer this as "rear flash" (flash at the end) or "front flash" (flash first) This does appear to have been done with an off-camera flash/strobe, so could either be the result ...


9

Simple: the flash duration is very short. A full-powered flash is usually around ¹⁄₂₀₀th of a second, and if less than full power is used, it can be in the ¹⁄₁₀₀₀₀th range. If this flash is the only significant contributor of light in the image (and indoors, it's easy for that to be the case), the rest of the time the shutter is open just doesn't matter. ...


8

In case this is useful to anyone else, I found that Image Analyzer 1.33 from MeeSoft is a freeware claiming to do "Deconvolution for out-of-focus and motion blur compensation".


8

Out of curiosity, are you using any kind of Servo AF? When photographing moving subjects, particularly those that may move closer/farther away while you pan and frame the shot, you should be using an AF mode that continually focuses. (I think the D90 calls such a mode AF-C.) Usually when using such a mode, the camera will lock focus onto something, then try ...


8

I've done a bit of dance photography, albeit under stage lights. A 50 f/1.4 (or f/1.8) is a very good idea as light is very limited. Shoot wide open and don't be afraid to push your ISO as high as it goes! I don't find the shallow depth of field a problem really, if you're shooting full length it's enough to get a whole person in focus on a crop camera. I ...


8

In general, use a smaller aperture. If that will not give you slow enough shutter speeds, neutral density filters (ND-filters) will give you slower shutter speeds without altering colors and such in the scene. They come in different strengths and can be combined. If you go shopping for an ND filter, make sure not to mix up graduated ND-filters with regular ...


8

Do the math. Let's say the plane is moving at 200 MPH, which is a plausible value right after takeoff or right before landing. Note that the flaps are extended, so one of these is the case. 200 MPH is 89 m/s. There is some blur. I'd say about 250 mm or less motion of the plane during the picture is about the limit that picture is showing us. That would ...


8

If you take a photo at 1/10 second without flash and the image is black, you have effectively "killed the ambient" with your shutter speed, the shutter duration is too fast (with your other settings) to allow enough light to hit your sensor to make an image. When you add flash, the flash duration is very, VERY fast, 1/1000 of a second or faster (depending ...


8

The issue that you are having is that your brother may appear to be still for the 3 seconds of your shutter speed but even breathing can impact the photo from being sharp. He is still moving even though it doesn't look like it. A solution I found with doing a photo like this is to have a flash set to second curtain and hit him with the flash; it should put ...


7

In Photoshop, you can access various blurs via the Blur sub-menu in Filters menu. Motion Blur will ask for an angle and an intensity and will blur the entire image (or selection) along that angle making it look like the camera exposed for motion. Radial blur will ask for a point and an intensity and will blur the pixels radially away from that point as if ...


7

Photos kind of similar to this can be achieved using a tracking shot where the photograph is taken from a car in front of the car being photographed, however in this particular case the answer is CG and/or heavy Photoshop. Particularly for the second image, there is no way to viably get that shot sharp without having the background also sharp. On the ...


7

Just a guess, but this is probably done with a strobe and a slow shutter speed. The strobe illuminates for a very short time, so everything appears stop-motion for the duration of the strobe. The rest of the time the shutter is open, much less light comes from the scene, but will have motion blur. The tricky in this is to balance the continuous lighting ...



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