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by VonSchnauzer

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60

The moon can be a tricky subject. It is a very bright subject compared to the rest of the night sky. It is also a moving subject, and it moves just fast enough that it can be problematic. Its luminosity changes depending on the time of the month. If you wish to capture any other elements in a scene with the moon, exposure can become fairly complicated. ...


44

I've only shot one, and that was with my Canon 350D with only a 17-85mm lens. Given that I didn't have a particularly long lens, I knew before I went out that I wouldn't be able to get any brilliant close-ups. What I decided beforehand was that some of collage was the most likely option for me. I ended up with just over 20 individual frames of the moon at ...


23

I had exactly the same problem when I first tried to photograph the moon: all I ever got was an overexposed white circle. The answer is that the moon is much brighter than you realise. Also, unless you have a very telescopic lens, it's going to be pretty small in your photo. If you use one of the camera's automatic modes, the camera will try to get the ...


23

Those are done using the compression of a telephoto lens. Longer lenses will magnify the subject, so will make the moon look bigger. It will also make buildings and other objects bigger, but by moving yourself further away from those earthbound objects you can reduce them back to a smaller size. But you can't really get further away from the moon, so it ...


19

The moon is still lit by sunlight -- I've had success around the 1/60 second at f/5.6 at ISO 100 in the past -- you'll need to fiddle around there to get settings that work for the amount of high cloud in the way etc. Changing the metering mode can help too - if you can use spot metering, then that should help and if your camera supports exposure ...


18

I think an application called "The Photographer's Ephemeris" might be what you are looking for. It's available for iOS, Android, Windows, and OS X.


17

I have taken a few years to perfect my moon shots. Many nights stood out in the cold!! On the months where the full moon is not obscured by cloud!! Here is what I do: You need a long lens! The moon may look large in the sky, but it will still be a dot in your viewfinder! Here is one instance where megapixels still count - as for the same reason above ...


16

I'm going to guess... you have a filter on your lens. Probably a UV filter? In my experience, that's the number one cause of ghosting in nighttime photography.


15

I would read this article for information on stacking and how to properly stack photos: http://www.naturescapes.net/docs/index.php/category-technical/145-long-exposure-astrophotography. The relevant information is farther down in the article. Looking at your shot, it appears that there is a fair amount blur, I'm guessing due to incorrect auto-tracking? ...


12

Photographing the moon in general can be difficult, as at any reasonably long focal length that will capture useful detail, the moon literally races across the sky. Using a telescope with a camera adapter will probably provide better results than a telephoto camera lens, however both are options. A telescope on a proper mount will likely provide much greater ...


12

The Moon has a lot of great contrast, unfortunately this makes a single shutter speed and a single exposure non-optimal. You will want to take as many frames as you can...start with around 24, taking a couple of hundred is not unheard of...or crazy talk...more is better. For your shutter speed take some test images at various speeds until you have three ...


12

You found the image at Mansurov's How to Photograph the Moon, so I think that's a good place to look for answers. Since he suggests using a 300mm lens and 1.4x or 2x teleconverter, I would bet those were used. Additionally, he also mentions that regardless of focal length, you are likely going to want to crop to get a tight photo.


12

If "to get good shadows" he means shadows cast by surface features on the moon, thats entirely a matter of opinion. The moon has dozens of faces, from thin crescents, normal crescents, half moons, gibbous moons, full moons for both waxing and waning, as well as eclipsed moons. I've shot the moon a lot myself, and I can't say there is any "right time". Its ...


11

I use LightTrac for the iPad. Not only does it tell you when but also the angle from which the sun will be coming at sunrise, sunset and right now, as the sun position varys seasonally. Besides, it's cool to be able to drag the slider around and see how the direction of the sun rays will vary. So say I want to photograph the tower in the middle of the plaza ...


10

Just take two shots. One to get properly exposed reflections (and a blown moon), and another to get a properly exposed moon (and everything else pretty much black). In Photoshop, copy and paste the properly exposed moon on top of the other image. If you don't want the halo, copy and paste the entire sky in the top right corner of your picture. If you ...


10

Well, the moon is around 16 stops brighter than the landscape, so short answer: no. I think even with very heavy ND filtering it would be tricky. You're better off doing a simple HDR stack, which you can do without getting the "HDR look". You might not even need to muck with any HDR software; just put each exposure in a layer and mess with opacity a bit.


10

For dark places you can turn off autofocus and use manual focusing. That works for focusing using the ring on the lens. To get very precise you do it after pressing the LV button. This shows the image on screen bigger. To get manual focus, press the [i] button and change AF-S (or AF-C) to MF. The lens for shooting only the moon is too short but if you want ...


10

It is worth mentioning the 'moon illusion' as well. The moon will look big to the human eye when close to the horizon but it is an illusion - try a photograph and see it 'shrink' to it's proper size. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_illusion And as a direct answer to your questions, long lens and careful placement of foreground interest.


9

First, I recommend you take a look at my answer to another question about photographing the moon here: Best Settings for Nighttime Moon Photos As for your specific question, it would probably be fairly difficult to get two shots that you could merge together without a tracking mount. As such, my first recommendation is to either buy an equatorial ...


8

I'd suggest trying without any filters to start. A typical dslr sensor has a filter built in that blocks most ir and uv light. There are filters available that will do a better job, but you can probably do just fine without any additional filters. A lens hood may be helpful to reduce stray light though.


8

The light from such objects is nowhere near bright enough to cause damage to the sensor, however using really long exposures to capture dim distant stars could damage the sensor by overheating. Most modern DSLRs have heat sensors and cutoffs to prevent this, but if you're using an older camera and keeping the shutter open for hours with an external power ...


8

Here is a simple how-to guide for attaching your DSLR to a telescope. With photos, and links to external information on related topics. tl;dr: You need a T-ring (or T-mount) to adapt your DSLR to the T-adapter, which slides into the telescope in place of the regular eyepiece. As you are going to be taking photos of vary distant objects with long ...


8

Space is really REALLY big and that has an amazing impact on angular momentum. Think about the sun in the sky. We're on a ball of rock that is moving at 67,000 mph and spinning at around 1000 miles per hour, but yet the sun crawls across the sky. The reason is because that while the speeds may be very high, the distance is even higher. At very long ...


8

The best time to shoot the supermoon is when you can really show off it's size. Shot solo, up alone in the sky, a supermoon doesn't look any different than any other moon. It lacks any dramatic comparisons to other objects of well-known size. You want to shoot a supermoon when it is lower in the atmosphere, and in proximity to foreground object, with the ...


8

The best time to shoot Earthshine is when the Moon is practically new, because the illuminated portion of the Moon's arc must be completely and utterly blown out in order to capture detail in the part of the Moon not illuminated by the Sun. You will need to use a tripod and cable release. Mirror lock up may not be a necessity depending on your shutter ...


8

With an image like this, the best and easiest solution is probably manual exposure fusion. It's easy enough to do in any raster graphics editor (GIMP, Photoshop, etc.). For example, here's what I managed to produce from your original images in a few minutes in GIMP: Here are the steps I used: Open both images as layers in GIMP, with the darker image ...


7

Taking a high resolution or close-up photo of a lunar eclipse is bound to disappoint. There usually isn't enough contrast to get a good image. This article provides a description of three methods you can use. I've taken out a few of the key points here for you. Short focal length telescope view Use a wide field of view eyepiece on your telescope to get ...


6

I suspect what's happening is one of the following things. Lens flare. This occurs usually when you have a bright source of light off to a side, and makes some usually hexagonal shaped images appear in your light, as seen below. The cure is to keep the light from said external sources from reaching your lens, and to keep your lens clean. Using a lens hood ...



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