Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

13

When you shoot monochrome as RAW files, the monochrome setting is just meta-data in the RAW file. The raw data from the sensor is still the same. You will only see the monochrome effect when you view the file in a program that supports the monochrome flag. Obviously what you are using to preview the images doesn't support it. The program from Nikon for ...


9

This technique is called Selective color. Sometimes, you select a point (in this case, somewhere on the CD-R case), and the region around that point that is close enough to the same color retains its color, while the rest of the picture becomes black and white. Other times, as you mention, you can select a color and a tolerance, or a range of colors, and ...


6

Not sure how this fits in with e-ink, but there is a product category called "trail camera" that might do what you need. These are cameras designed to take pictures in the dark or light in response to motion and most should easily meet your one week power requirement. Although most of these cameras store the images on a local card, there are models that ...


3

It's not clear why you are asking, but the question strongly hints what you are trying to do isn't the way to solve the problem. It's been many years since I last worked with lith film. I have used it for exposure masks for other photolithographic processes like making circuit boards and silk screening T shirts. In all cases I experimented with the ...


3

While shooting in B/W with RAW mode might give you a preview of how would it appear in monochrome, but when you shoot in RAW no matter what effects you have applied during shooting, it will show the raw data from the sensor.


2

You don't need to go to the extremes of attempting your own demosaicing, doing so would be a lot of work for no real benefit — all good raw converters use an algorithm that attempts to identify and exploit regions where the hue doesn't change in order to maximise the amount of detail recovered. In any case unless you are reproducing images at 1:1 ...


2

The filter you're thinking of is a Wratten #90. They used to come as gels, so you'd have to get a gel holder or just hold it and operate the camera one-handed. (Or just hold it in front of your face and don't bother with the camera.) Both of your cameras have a mode that desaturates the image before storage, which would let you chimp it on the LCD after ...


2

Record Menu -> Photo Style -> Standard (Change from Monochrome) Can be seen here: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicdmcgf3/5


2

Could I save power by using a camera with only grayscale detectors? No. You couldn't. Sensors are greyscale right up into the IR range and only become 'colour' with the application of a coloured filter array. The number of pixels in a sensor does not have an appreciable difference on power requirements and so switching to a monochrome camera is ...


2

As I understand it, your thinking is: e-ink displays save power by being monochrome. Therefore, it seems logical that one could also save power with a monochrome sensor. But, this is based on a false assumption. E-ink is low power because it is an entirely different technology, one which requires power only to change a pixel from light to dark (or back ...


1

There would be a legitimate question if you were looking at inkjet (giclée) printing, where the choice of paper surface is largely a matter of taste and preference. In this case, though, you're looking at "lightjet" printing, which is an optical printing process (just like in the film days) except that it uses a scanning laser instead of a projected image to ...


1

Almost all in-camera settings that affect image adjustments are irrelevant when shooting raw. With raw, all image adjustments need to be controlled in your raw software instead of in-camera. The file basically contains the raw readers from the camera sensor without any adjustments. What this means is that if you're shooting raw and want monochrome, you ...


1

Higher tech solutions :-): It requires extra equipment and cost, but any camera that provides live view (or even post-view) video output can be used to drive an external monitor of your choice. You could use this facility to either drive a monochrome display or a colour display that is able to desaturate the image. I have not (yet) done this with a DSLR ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible