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Time to be with loved ones

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29

There are probably a few things you should look for. Color range is probably the most important factor, and a monitor that is at least capable of representing the Adobe RGB Wide Gamut color space (or color gamut) is important. Most professional cameras will generate images in the Adobe RGB space, while many printers, such as Epson's Stylus Pro line, support ...


21

The 27" LED mac displays are "full gamut" displays, ones that cover around 98% of the Adobe RGB gamut. These are full 8 bit/channel (24bit) screens and offer a full 178° viewing angle. They are much higher quality displays than your average LCD screen, and specifically designed to output high quality, rich, saturated graphics. Additionally, Safari, which I ...


11

There are a three types of flat-panel monitors (IPS, VA, and TN) and IPS will give you the best results for photography. It's often difficult to figure out the exact type of panel a given monitor uses; here's a list. Install it somewhere you can provide consistent lighting, and calibrate it with a hardware colorimeter.


11

The short answer is that yes, essentially all monitors need calibrating if you're going to do photoediting. Apple makes some decent monitors, but they're not particularly different from others, nor (specifically) any less in need of calibration than others. Keep in mind, however, that calibration isn't magic -- it won't suddenly make a really cheap monitor ...


10

Gamut and color count are not really the same thing, although a low bit depth will start to affect gamut to a degree (i.e. a 6-bit flat panel will never be wide gamut, simply because its sampling of the color space is too sparse.) Gamut describes the range of colors, from the total L*a*b* space, that a monitor is capable of representing. Many monitors are ...


8

Some monitors need more calibration than others and their color-gamut limits how close they can actually get to showing accurate colors. For example, if a monitor can only has 80% coverage of sRGB, then even after the best calibration it will at most show 80% of colors right. Good monitors now cover 100% (at least 98%) of sRGB and a good percentage (92%+) ...


8

Probably not the answer you want, but if you have a bad monitor, and a bad printer, you're probably going to get bad prints. A color calibration system (hardware) would help, but that's an investment of money and if you aren't willing to do that for your monitor/printer I'm guessing you aren't willing to spend the money on a calibrator. If you don't make a ...


8

The 27" iMac has a pretty mid-high end LED backlit S-IPS LCD panel. Your low end Dell laptop and LCD monitors probably use TN panels which are inferior in color reproduction, angel of viewing, saturation, etc. Most TN panels are only 18 bit displays, so they will interpolate the 24 bit color your graphics card is putting out, while IPS panels will give you ...


8

It looks like the ZR30W uses a fluorescent backlight. Although it's a cold-cathode fluorescent, the color still changes a little with the temperature. You want to be sure you let the display warm up for quite a while before profiling it to be sure the temperature is stable. The usual recommendation is something like 20 minutes as a minimum, but from what ...


8

It is pretty much impossible, although you can get closer. At the very least you need a color-calibration device. Using that device you calibrate your screen so that the colors it can show are close to how they should be. Most laptop displays sadly only show 60-75% of sRGB color, so there can be up to 40% of colors you cannot see in the laptop. Instead they ...


6

It actually really depends on the software. It is especially important to do some research here because some graphics card have really big power requirements, and your computer might not be able to accommodate any of them. Make sure to compare the specs of your power supply to those of the graphics card. To my knowledge Lightroom is not GPU accelerated ...


6

In addition to what others said about the display quality, I would like to mention that there is no need to switch to iMac to see nice colors. Dell itself manufactures several display models widely considered as good for color-sensitive work. They also have IPS panels and wide gamut at a lower price than the Apple product. See for example DELL UltraSharp ...


6

The reason that you get a black band across the screen is that you are using a shutter speed that is too short. The image on the screen is refreshed at a specific rate. This rate differs depending on where you live but it's either 50 or 60 Hz. There are also televison sets that refresh the image at double the rate; 100 or 120 Hz. The screen is refreshed ...


6

Yes, there is a point. It will let you see your own photos more accurately. Since you do not print them, I assume you look at them on your own monitor. Even if it is only for others, non-calibrated monitors differ widely but they are improving at least in the mid-range with the advent of LEDs (and eventually OLEDs), so over time people will see your images ...


5

Apple is not the only manufacturer who provides the option of glossy monitors. Because you see rows of iMacs in the Apple store with glossy monitors does not mean Apple is the only manufacturer who provides them. Also, not all Apple monitors are glossy. Pros for Glossy Monitors Higher perceived contrast and saturation. This is a two-edged sword. The ...


5

Pick a monitor with an IPS panel. Suffice it to say these monitors offer far superior viewing angles and colour performance for photographers and anyone working in visual arts, over the inferior TN panels that are more common in budget monitors. Like you I have a 13" macbook and I recently picked up an HP ZR24W after a few recommendations and favourable ...


5

Jerry Coffin's answer was excellent, and I can't add a whole lot more. One other possibility may be the calibration hardware itself. There are two fundamental types of calibration devices: Colorimiters and Spectrophotometers. A Colorimiter is a "scientifically subjective" device. It uses an approach to calibration called "tristimulus", and is designed to ...


5

If it was me, I'd invest in something like a Huey, use it to calibrate my monitor as best as possible, and then use the photo editing software's color profile to control the printed output and not the printer's default. This tends to get the best results. One more note. Your printer has certain expectations that you'll be using their specially formulated ...


5

I would say that a wide-gamut display is NOT really necessary if you only intend to publish to the web. As you know, sRGB is pretty much the lowest common denominator for presentation on the web. Unless you expect the majority of your viewers to be using color-managed web browsers capable of properly rendering images tagged with AdobeRGB, there aren't really ...


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


5

Considering that an average monitor has about 6-bit per channel color depth (8 bit minus the dithering), I guess 10-bit is for color proofing/professional DTP/digital cinema. And higher than 8 bit per channel has another challenges: Video card: the video card needs to support color outputs more than 8 bits per channel. Considering that DVI supports only 8 ...


4

The graphics card can be very important when it comes to editing photos. Most current photo editing programs e.g. Photoshop CS4/5 use the graphics card to do some of the processing, taking the load off the processor. You don't need a monster gaming card, most low to mid range consumer cards will give you an advantage. If you plan to use Photoshop it's worth ...


4

The cheapest color-calibratable display which has a wide-gamut which is essential to seeing colors accurately is the NEC P221W and it falls very close to your budget. This is an excellent monitor, I own two of them, along with a larger 30" model which costs a lot more. The wide-gamut aspect is truly important as it lets you see most colors in your images ...


4

Another factor to consider is the type of panel that you purchase. IPS or in-plane switching panels are better at all viewing angles and are also very good at reproducing colors. Typical inexpensive monitors will use TN(twisted nematic) panels which will not produce the same colors and have a smaller viewing angle. To answer your question yes all monitors ...


4

First I want to make sure that the importance of proper hardware calibration is understood. Your eyes are not perfect(mine especially) and you can certainly give it a shot to determine the best brightness, tint, gamma, etc. but you are not going to be nearly as spot on as a dedicated piece of hardware. In reading you will find that as the display gets older, ...


4

Actually, #E58C4E, if you mean the web color, is defined to be in sRGB. However, if you didn't mean that particular convention but rather "red:229, green:140, blue:78", it's a different matter, because the extremes (the "primaries") of each channel are different in different color spaces, so those numbers actually do represent something different in each ...


3

As you observed, laptop display colors tend to shift a lot with viewing angle, even more noticeably than desktop LCDs. You can't do anything about the screen's inherent shift, so you just have to keep your line of sight as perfectly perpendicular to the screen as you can. Try sitting back further (reduces how much a slight motion of your head affects the ...


3

There are several reasons why you're pictures might look better. As a few answers have pointed out, iMac screen's are pretty decent for general color rendition. Also, by default Mac's have a different gamma than Window's PCs. Mac's had a gamma of 1.8, and PC's have a gamma of 2.2--however since 10.6 snow leopard, Mac's now have a default gamma of 2.2. ...



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