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Time to be with loved ones

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23

There are several related questions here. Are mirror lenses good at all (opinion) Are mirror lenses good for wldlife shots in daylight. Are cheap mirror lenses value for money. Relevant: I own a Minolta 500mm AF f8 "Reflex" lens- the only model of AF "mirror" lens ever made AFAIK and one of the better quality ones around. I think that as long as you ...


14

Mirrors reflect, there's nothing you can do about that (except spray the mirror with something but clients are unlikely to go for that). All you can do is position the mirror and camera so that what's reflected is as unobjectionable as possible. A good idea would probably be to position the mirror to reflect a plain wall or ceiling. If you get further away ...


11

Simple, it allows you to see exactly what the camera will "see" when you expose the shot. Nir has given you a part of the argument as well which is accuracy. In the "middle ground" of anything around mabye 20-100mm, building a rangefinder is not too difficult and Leica had adapters for longer and wider lenses if I am not mistaken. It takes some effort to ...


10

I do own a 1100D and don't find the mirror noise so loud. In Live View, the mirror is up, so that would explain the lower noise when you take the picture. My advice would be to go to a shop and compare the noise with the 1100D that is on display. IF it is the same, then your ears may just be too sensitive. If it isn't, then head out to the service center and ...


10

The mirror in a DSLR reflects light from the lens into the viewfinder pentaprism, allowing you to look through the viewfinder to frame a shot. At rest, the mirror sits at an angle in front of the shutter and sensor, blocking the light from hitting them. When you click the shutter button, the mirror lifts up, allowing the light to hit the sensor to make the ...


9

Yes, the A77 has a mechanical shutter and it does move at 12 FPS per second. There are a number of cameras with similar shutter-speeds including some ultra-zooms but indeed this is very fast. What it does not have is a motor to move the mirror. This is more problematic for speed then the shutter itself since a mirror is heavy and has to move out of the way ...


7

I'm not entirely sure if @StanRogers answer covers it entirely so I'll add this. When you use compressed air canisters several things happen besides the blast of air which can (as Stan describes) remove things like the thin film coating. First, the gas, stored under pressure expands quickly, this gas expands because its heating up and has room (less ...


7

As Rob said, a tilt-shift lens is ideal. I talked to a product photographer who specifically mentioned it's use. Basically, you position the camera on a tripod just to the left or right of the mirror so it's out of the reflection. With a normal lens it will be obvious that it's taken at an angle but by using the shift function of the lens you're able to ...


7

There are many nooks and crannies in a modern dslr mirror box to hold (and hide) dust. If it's just dust - not fluid - I use a strong blower (like the VisibleDust Hurricane Blower) with the body held lens mount down. As I compress the blower with a quick, strong squeeze, I quickly (but carefully) move the body up, away from the blower in as smooth a motion ...


6

Pretty sure it's not possible with the wireless remote. You can set custom function D11 to ON. D11 is the Exposure Delay Mode, which will flip the mirror up then wait a second and then trigger the shutter. With this turned on, your wireless remote will work in remote mode and you'll get a 1 second mirror up delay.


6

The only disadvantages are that it slows down your shooting (you have to wait a second or two after locking the mirror for the vibrations to subside) and that the viewfinder is black during this time so you can't react to changes in the scene. Having said that, you only benefit from mirror lookup when using telephoto lenses, or when shooting slow shutter ...


5

I would assume that you are correct in that dust has "worked its way in" to the camera and is now dispersing itself around the innards!. You might consider having it professionally cleaned out. I have a D300 and use it regularly semi-professionally, several times a week, regularly changing lenses - it is usually kept in a bag. I have never needed to clean ...


5

Given the age of the OM-1, it's a fair guess that the only way to get a replacement mirror would be to buy a junk OM-1 with a good mirror, and remove the mirror from one body and transplant it into the other. As you've already found, the mirror is quite fragile, so doing this would be fairly difficult. Second, it's easy to find film cameras in good ...


4

Take a look at the catalog pictures of any major store like target.com or walmart.com. The seem to have covered the reflective area with paper ( gradient might have been added in post processing). After covering the reflective area, you can just shoot it as you would any other product. You can also do some green screening by covering the reflective area ...


4

For the price some of them aren't bad. You can get good reach at a cheap price. However, they have many disadvantages The out of focus background will be poor. Horrible donut-shaped bokeh Many of these lenses have poor contrast and color Fixed aperture, so can't control depth of field You will find good images online taken with these, but I think ...


3

Man, this is definitely a serious overkill. First of all, you need a good quality laser AND good quality mirrors. I mean laser-quality mirrors, to have predictable results. Second of all, you cannot simply "stitch" resulting images, as only standing waves will show a time invariant pattern, all others will be time varying (varying with phase from source, ...


3

I've had a few Canon DSLRs, one being the Canon Rebel XT. It does have a distinctive sound, one that I could pick out of a blind lineup against other Canon DSLRs. The biggest reason that it is louder is that it was a very early model in the entry level digital SLR camera arena. The Canon Digital Rebel was the only other predecessor in the line. Therefore ...


3

Mirror lock up is effective if the camera is held in place (by a tripod, resting on a place...). If the camera is hand held, or on a monopod, its benefits are reduced or completely lost. In short, when using mirror lock up, first you compose, then the mirror flips and the camera waits for some short time before taking the picture. This gives time to dampen ...


3

Several answers have recommended a tilt-shift lens. If you don't happen to have access to one, note that you can get a very similar effect by correcting the perspective digitally. Panorama stitching programs like hugin are very handy for this, as long as the picture includes suitable guide lines (see e.g. this tutorial). If not, you could always add some ...


2

Note that although the A77 does have a mechanical shutter, it also has an adjustment to pre-open the mechanical shutter, and just use an electronic shutter to start a picture. This reduces shutter lag (by a large percentage, but it's already normally short enough to be mostly imperceptible) and noise, which can be handy if you're shooting things like ...


2

Background Information I will share the information from the Nikon page on Live View shooting on D-SLR cameras here. Traditional D-SLR phase-detection AF sensors are blocked whenever a camera raises its reflex mirror to expose the imaging sensor, which is what happens in Live View's Handheld Mode. Since the imaging sensor constantly streams data ...


1

Its tradition. When we had film cameras, a mirror system was used to give the photographer an accurate image of what the lens was seeing irrespective of which lens was attached. Obviously one could have a system with a live viewer. Old time photographers are used to looking in a view finder and composing an image.


1

In my point of view it has nothing to do with focus detection capabilities since you are in manual focus mode. It more likely that in single shooting the processor can handle live view function with single shooting but for continuous shooting the live view will be taken on hold to empty the buffer, focus the processor on image processing and provide the ...


1

To complement it with some videos to see the mirror in action please have a look at the following ones among many more... http://youtu.be/tU-ZHadg3Jo http://youtu.be/ptfSW4eW25g


1

Something not mentioned so far: vignetting. I'll go out on a limb and say all mirrors exhibit a certain amount of vignetting -- certainly more than a comparable refracting lens. This might be a problem, or it might not. Shooting a bird or a plane in the sky makes it quite noticeable; shooting a bird in a bush, not so much. Beyond that, I'll say the bokeh ...


1

I have an old Nikkor 500mm F8 mirror lens, and I've loved it for 30 years. Yes, its a fixed F8. Its fine for sports and I would expect long distance wildlife. Its light and easy to hand hold, but you have to be shooting at 1/250 or faster. I find the color and contrast to be more than acceptable. I use it on my Canon 50D, the Canon doesn't seem to notice ...


1

It doesn't look good (I'm jumping in because nobody else has answered) Short answer: I would be very surprised if there were a feasible way to fix this at home. To be fair, I am not a repair technician, so I could be wrong, but I don't think many photographers would want to risk it. So, if you don't want to take it to an approved repair shop, I ...



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