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10

Summary: The 18-55mm kit lens is better than many kit lenses and is worth buying. (This is based on an extensive body of information available for both lenses. See below) While many old Minolta Full Frame lenses are very good optically, and better than typical entry level A-mount Sony lenses, in this case the 18-55mm kit lens is noticeably superior ...


10

Minolta, like Canon, changed their mount when they moved to AF in the 1980s. Only Minolta AF lenses can be used on Sony's Alpha mount. The field of view will be cropped due to the fact that the sensor in your camera is smaller than the imaging size of film. So a 50mm lens will have the field of view of a 75mm lens, as the crop factor is 1.5. Here's a good ...


7

Yes and they should all work. All of mine certainly do. The first thing Sony did when acquiring Konica-Minolta's camera division is release DSLRs with the same mount. These were named Alpha which is the same name Minolta used in Japan, they used the Maxxum name in North America and Dynax in Europe. In other words, Sony Alpha mount IS the Minolta Alpha/...


6

First of all, this leaves only .5 mm for the adapter, which isn't a lot. With a mount that's a lot smaller in diameter most of the adapter could sit inside the EF mount ring, and you could probably do it. From what I recall of the diameters, they're similar enough that this would be extremely difficult, if possible at all (and I'm leaning toward "probably ...


6

Consider getting a lens reversal ring. Screw it on the filter end and then you can mount the lenses on your D7000 in reverse for some macro shots!


6

I am not familiar with this exact lens and camera model, but with similar questions related to Sony Alpha cameras and manual focus lenses. I assume your camera gives an error message similar to the following: "Check the lens attachment. If the lens is not supported, you can permit use of the lens in the custom menu." I suspect the reason for this is that ...


5

Sorry, but no -- a Konica FS-1 uses a different mount than either the Minolta MC/MD or the A mount. Konica did buy out Minolta, but this was quite a while after the FS-1, FT-1, etc., had been discontinued. They also sold the Minolta camera division off to Sony quite soon after acquiring Minolta. As far as I know, there was never any work done on creating ...


5

Depth of field calculation depends on multiple factors: captor size focal length aperture and last but not least: subject distance Using a Depth of field simulator (http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html) with your camera, you will get the following result: Distance to subject: 5 meters 50mm f/1.7 => Depth of Field of 0.67 m 70 mm f/4 => Depth of Field ...


4

No. Do not buy an adapter. Any adapter for Minolta MD lenses to Nikon bodies will either sacrifice the ability to focus to infinity or require a (usually cheap, low quality single) lens element for infinity focus. This is a simple consequence of the Nikon lens mount sitting further away from the body than on the manual Minolta MD system. Short of ...


4

No. The six SLR mounts that you can easily adapt to Canon EOS with simple ring adapters are Leica-R, Nikon F, Contax/Yashica, Pentax K, M42, and Olympus OM. But Minolta AF lenses work just fine on Sony Alpha (A-mount) dSLRs and dSLTs without any adapters. And you can, of course, adapt these to mount on the Sony E-mount (NEX). But not for Canon EOS. When ...


4

It seems I was able to locate the problem, I found an answer on Flickr. There is a mechanical problem with the camera. When taking of the objective and looking on the camera from the front, there is a ring with a small hook on it which is called the MC Coupler. When the objective is set on the camera, this hook 'tells' the setting of the aperture on the ...


4

That means that fake lens data is transmitted to the camera. The camera therefore records that it took a photo with a 50mm F/1.4, probably always at F/1.4 regardless of which lens you actually have mounted on the adapter. Some adapters do not send any data and show Unknown Lens instead. Now since you are asking this, I am guessing you do not look much at ...


4

Consider Sony A-mount Your Tamron lens is Minolta AF mount. This is, in fact, the same lens mount that Sony's A-mount SLT cameras use, so if it's absolutely imperative that you use this lens, Sony's A-mount cameras would not require an adapter and would give the highest level of compatibility (including autofocus). However, to most of us, a third-party ...


4

It reminds me of one of my FD mount lenses where you pull\push to adjust focal length, rotate to adjust focus, and then there is the aperture ring for...well adjusting the aperture. I don't quite understand what you mean when you say 'swipe' through the aperture settings. It is a variable aperture so, when it is at 205mm it has an aperture of 4.8 as ...


4

The Minolta Hi Matic 9 has a fixed 45mm lens. It is not possible to switch lenses. Source: oldcamerareview Lens variety and interchangeability – Nope, you won’t get that either. But, if you are the person that had to save up and finally got your Leica and lens, you probably can’t afford another lens for awhile anyway.


3

Sony no longer makes DSLRs but they do make cameras, which they call SLT, that directly accept A-mount lenses. Those lenses will work fully with any such camera. If you go with the full-frame SLT-A99 (high-end model), they will show exactly the same field-of-view as with a film camera. Otherwise, you can get a cropped-sensor model with a focal-length ...


3

No adapters on DSLR bodies support autofocus. On mirrorless bodies, there is an autofocus adapter for Sony/Minolta AF lenses on Sony NEX cameras. Nikon F-mount in general is notorious for not being able to adapt any other 35mm lenses, and retain infinity focus.


3

Donate them to your local high school. Both my kids took several semesters of photography in high school. Old school film bodies, lenses, enlargers, darkrooms, great stuff... Whenever my daughter went out shooting with me I'd make her use the Canon nifty-fifty to make her work even harder, the high school kids today are the photographers or tomorrow, help ...


3

I hardly believe that this camera is still in production, so the "new" camera is probably a new old stock one. Hence I wouldn't consider this $99 as the list price. If the sellers can convince the buyers that the Japanese one is better than the Chinese (it's not really important if it's true or not) then the price of the Japanese will be higher. If they can'...


3

The Sony A3000 utilizes the Sony E-mount. Looks like the Minolta lens uses the older Minolta / Sony alpha mount. It's slightly confusing because the body is called a "Sony Alpha" but the mount isn't an alpha. You can get the Sony LA-EA3 adapter which will allow you to utilize all the functions of the alpha lens on the A3000 except autofocus. It looks like ...


3

Yes, there are. Any digital camera with an A-mount will accept them directly. The Sony A68 is the latest such model and uses an APS-C sensor so it will crop the field of view by 1.5X, meaning all your lenses will become less wide but they will still work. To preserve the field-of-view, you can use a full-frame model such as the Sony SLT-A99V. There is ...


2

As long as the lenses are real Minoltas, you should be fine. Oh, unless you have a 200 f/2.8, a 100 f/2 or the 3x-1x Macro zoom. If you have any of these, don't even try to mount them to the camera -- just send them to me, because they really, really won't work! Honest! Just send them to me. Really! :-)


2

One place I would suggest looking is KEH, an online used gear dealer. A search for MD fisheye on their site currently (as I write this post) yields nothing in the price range you're looking for, but they do seem to have 4 16mm/2.8 lenses in stock, at higher prices. Another option would be to go and check thrift stores or street/flea markets in your area... ...


2

There is no such things as "should" here. "Should" indicates you feel that you're the one who should determined the business policy and pricing of the companies involved rather than the companies themselves doing so. If you feel there's no additional value in the Japanese built camera, go ahead and buy the cheaper Chinese model. Enough people (including the ...


2

You should consider buying an adapter that makes it possible to use the Minolta lenses on your Nikon. Many old Minolta lenses are of good quality (I have owned some of them). You will have to set the focus and aperture manually. Lens mount adapter Maybe you do not get the best optical quality, but if you are looking for creative ways to use your lens this ...


2

There is different way to adapt lenses designed for one brand to fit another brand of DSLR. If the flange focal distance of the lens brand is bigger than the one of the body, you can use a lens-less adapter ring (as an example Contax C/Y mount lenses on Canon) Doing the same with shorter flange distance (as exemple Contax C/Y mount lenses on Nikon) has ...


2

Okay, after some digging, I found a Flickr discussion that partially answers my question: http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikon_d300_users/discuss/72157624796707182/ Someone claims that a ~50mm M42 wearing a thin glassless Nikon adapter can have a max focusing distance of 2.5m. The question of what can be achieved via more invasive modification, such as ...


2

It sounds like everything is fine- some cameras don't rewind the film all the way back into cartridge, and yours must be one of them. When you get the film developed, you won't see any problem.



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