Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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26

There is a disadvantage due to the sensor size, everyone will say that. While true, it is actually quite minimal. Obviously, it varies between models but a recent m4/3 camera compares to a recent one with an APS-C within one stop in terms of noise, and it is rarely visible until ISO 800+. Here is how the differences looked last year. All these models had one ...


25

The first technical difference is the fact that the sensor is smaller than the most common DSLR sensor sizes (APS-C and larger), whilst it's going to be less optimal than an APS-C, full frame or medium format (very expensive) sensor, it's still going to be far better than compact sensors. Noise will be comparable to APS-C (1.6x), though probably not quite as ...


22

Keep the camera as cool as possible! High temperature increases the thermal noise in your images. That's why certain astrophotographers actively cool their camera!


21

You can reduce noise without lowering ISO by slightly overexposing your picture, especially if you shoot RAW. From the Expose (to the) Right article at Luminous Landscape: A 12 bit image is capable of recording 4,096 (2^12) discrete tonal values. One would think that therefore each F/Stop of the 5 stop range would be able to record some 850 ...


14

A few options for reducing the noise other than lowering the iso or increasing the light: Keep the camera's sensor cool. Take a burst of photos, then average them. Lower the resolution.


14

The basic answer is that Canon's 50mm f/1.8 is an exception even within Canon's lineup. It's an old, simple design with nothing fancy, and made to be mass-produced cheaply. Compare the Canon 85mm f/1.8, at AU$360. Basically, almost no lenses are as cheap as the one you're using as your reference point, so your perception is skewed. The Olympus lenses aren't ...


12

Let's say I have a micro-4/3rd camera and a full frame camera, both set to 1/60 at f/2.8, taking a picture of the same scene in the same lighting. Will the exposure be the same across both cameras despite the different sensor sizes? Yes - if it's the same lens or both lenses have the same transmission, and assuming that by saying "same exposure" you're ...


12

Just a clarification: the size of a Micro 4:3 sensor is the same as a normal 4:3 sensor (what changes is the distance from the focusing elements to the sensor plane). Of course the 4:3 itself is a little bit smaller than an APS-C, but not much. So do not expect worse sensor performance than in any Olympus or Panasonic DSLR. ...


12

The problem with your prerequisites is that you've painted yourself into a corner. First you asked for a single lens suitable for landscape (generally wide) and wildlife (long or very long). This restricts you to the few super-zooms around. Then you've asked for that same lens to be good for fast actions and low light, both of which require bright lenses. ...


12

Have you seen a gallery showing decades old photographs from 35mm film? All mirrorless cameras do better, much better. Do you think those pictures would get rejected today on the grounds of being to grainy, unsharp or lacking contrast? Gallery quality has much more to do with with content of photographs than anything else. Light, color, gesture says Jay ...


11

I'm not sure if you are asking about the micro four thirds standard or the 4:3 aspect ratio, so I'll answer both: Why do mirrorless cameras use micro four thirds? They don't, only Panasonic and Olympus build micro four thirds cameras, there are a lot of other companies making mirrorless cameras (for example: Sony, Fujifilm, Samsung, etc.) that have other ...


10

Nobody mentioned the fact that micro four thirds cameras are very good for experimenting with old manual lenses. The micro 4/3 system is mirrorless, and has a very short falange distance (distance from sensor to lens), that allows it to use most lenses on the market, with an adapter (and there are lots of types of adapters). the slow focusing speed is not ...


9

The 40-150mm is optically better and lets you open to F/4 at 40mm, while the 14-150mm is already F/5.6 by that focal-length, so you get more light in until you get close to the end of the zoom range. For sharpness, it depends which side of the 40-150mm range you prefer. At 40mm, the 14-150mm is noticeably sharper than the 40-150mm. At 150mm, the 40-150mm is ...


9

No.* The micro four thirds to four thirds adaptor is basically a tube which mounts the four thirds lens further from the sensor. In order to do the reverse you would have to mount the micro four thirds lens closer to the sensor, which is not possible as there is stuff in the way! *at least whilst preserving the ability to focus at moderate distances.


9

Ignoring for the moment aspect ratio, from a theoretical viewpoint there is will be no visual difference, provided you maintain the same subject & camera position / orientation the same angle of view the same resolution (number of megapixels) the same size entrance pupil (focal length divided by f-number) the same lens characteristics The first two ...


8

Micro 4/3rds has a slightly smaller sensor than crop DSLRs, has slower autofocus, is more likely to get dust in the sensor, and depending on the camera, might not have a see-through lens. This would make taking picture outdoors very difficult. With help from Wikipedia


8

All SLDs, other than the Nikon 1 J1, have a mechanical shutter. This is most likely what you hear each time a shot is taken. Most of them use the mechanical shutter at the beginning of the shot and all of them use one at the end. The latest models omit the front curtain to improve shutter-lag but that is because they found a way to reliable discharge the ...


8

I have an Olympus body (E-PL1) and a Panasonic lens (100-300mm zoom), and haven't noticed any special problems. It feels kind of silly to have 'paid' for in-lens stabilization that I keep turned off, but even when I've accidentally knocked the switch into the on position, it doesn't ruin the average shot (it makes for odd effects during long exposures on a ...


8

Breaking down your question: Is it worth the effort? If you already own lenses and don't want to spend money on digital lenses, you could say it is worth it. If you don't want to fiddle with the manual focus, it's not worth it. If you have to use this in an environment where fast focusing is critical, then no, it's not worth it. This is a bit subjective. ...


8

My advice goes for no, don't switch. You always have the backup camera in your phone; do you currently even try capturing pictures with that when your big DSLR is away? If not, I suspect the real reason why you're not taking pictures now is not the size of your camera. It's probably either lacking time or dismissing opportunities to actually take some ...


8

Sorry, no; the magnification designation of a macro lens is the ratio of the physical size of the object to the size it appears on the sensor, meaning at 1:2 magnification, the image of the object would be half life size on the sensor (so e.g. a 2cm diameter coin would have an image 1cm wide on the sensor). Of course being a smaller sensor, the image would ...


8

You will crop away the outer edge of the image and this will cause you to lose the highly distorted edges of the photo. this is particularly obvious when you are dealing with a very very wide angle where normally a circular image would be seen but due to the crop you see a square image. This review of the Canon 8-15mm fisheye contains a picture how the ...


8

Camera and lens designs are full of compromises and certain decisions have knock on effect throughout the system. Olympus decided on a particularly thick filter stack when specifying the micro four thirds system. This and the short backfocus distance of a mirrorless lens mount necessitate a telecentric or near telecentric lens design where rays exit the ...


7

Generally speaking, the smaller sensor is its biggest disadvantage. The smaller the sensor, the higher the noise. The smaller the sensor, the larger minimum DoF. There's nothing "holy" in DSLR (FF or APS-C) form factor either. In terms of sensor size, these types are just two points in the continuum from digital medium format cameras to cellphone cameras. ...


7

Since this question was originally asked, the Micro Four-Thirds system has advanced and some of the earlier answers have become outdated. The latest generation of cameras has fast auto-focus although they still lag behind DSLRs for low-light and continuous tracking (eg birds in flight and sports) due to lack of phase-contrast autofocus. The lens selection is ...


7

First, the only Micro Four-Thirds macro current is the Leica 45mm F/2.8. The easiest thing to adapt to Micro Four-Third are Four-Third lenses, since they are designed to work in exactly the same way with an all-electronic interface. When you adapt other lenses, you will usually lose features like autofocus or stop-down metering. Here are all current ...


7

Well many a camera bag has interchangeable dividers that allow you to custom fit the interior compartments - so any of those can be a micro four thirds bag. Since you're going to be throwing the whole kitchen sink your bag ("a camera, a bunch of lenses and some accessories (like extra battery / charger) plus a MacBook Air 11") there's little use in ...


7

I will present the "quick and dirty" version of my answer, because I could talk on this topic for pages and pages. Essentially the 14mm f/2.5 "pancake" is a prime lens, which means it does not zoom, it has one fixed focal length. So instead of zooming in and out to frame your subject, you have to move your feet along with the camera! The fixed focal length ...


7

The Four Thirds standard for digital SLRs was designed by Olympus and Kodak to be the first system specifically made for digital, with high standards for telecentric lenses and other design choices for a modern era, rather than adapting a film lens mount. At the time, full-frame sensors were really out of reach in terms of cost, and the smaller sensor ...


7

Our very own Itai runs Neocamera, which has such a list.



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