Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

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0

I just called Nikon on this topic, my manual modes were not working. The camera showed eveything was overexposed but shot them underexposed. The camera's meter would not move no matter how much I tried to adjust the settings. The solutions was to turn off the camera in automode. turn it back on and hold down the 2buttons by the green dots, mine were the +/- ...


0

Another trick, which avoids changing settings but is easier with a tripod is to autofocus, release, flick the switch on the lens to set manual focus, then recompose and shoot. I sometimes do this, or occasionally change focus point, but I prefer a half press to lock the exposure as well as the focus (if the background is lighter than the subject it's often ...


3

Your camera is locking both focusing and metering with shutter button half-press - focus lock is called AFL, metering lock is called AEL. It will be most convinient for you to setup your camera to not lock metering with half-press. You do not need to use additional buttons for that at all despite other suggestions.


9

It sound like your camera is locking the exposure in addition to the focus when you perform a half shutter press. This would explain the overexposure when moving from a dark river to the bright sky: the camera is set to expose a dark scene properly, but it then gets pointed at a brighter scene, and subsequently over exposes. The converse is true as well, ...


3

This happens because (by default) a half-press on the shutter not only sets the auto-focus, but the auto-exposure as well. If you don't want to set the exposure or focus manually, you can set one of the function buttons to activate auto-exposure lock ("AEL"). With this setup, you would point the camera at the object you want to expose for first, push the AEL ...


3

is this as simple as metering off a standard 18% gray card every few photos (or say every 30 minutes)? Could this be accomplished in post-photo editing software? The issue here is white balance, and there are basically two options: you can take steps to make sure that the light is always the same color, or you can adjust the white balance to compensate ...


1

You could kill the ambient light and light the scene only with a flash unit or strobe. See: What does it mean to "kill the ambient"?



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