Serene Life

by garik

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27

I format my card every time I stick it in my camera and start a shoot. I do this for a couple of reasons. First, it means every time I start a shoot, I don't accidentally leave the previous shoot on it (and it also means I don't delete it until I start the next shoot, by which time those images are safely on various backup disks; gives me an emergency ...


27

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system ...


23

Professional cameras such as the Canon 1D Mark IV have dual memory card slots for a variety of professional use cases. I will break them down into three main groupings: Mirroring of the image across multiple cards for redundancy Automatic switching to a second card after the first one reaches capacity Ability to write different file formats to different ...


21

I believe this has to do with Long Exposure Noise Reduction. To cancel out noise the camera will close the shutter and take an equally long exposure again, this time capturing a black image with only the electrical noise on it. This information is then used to reduce the noise on the original exposure. In the camera settings you can disable the Noise ...


20

Fundamentally they are the same thing in a different package but they work differently. SD cards use their own protocol which was extended to go beyond 2 GB up to 32 GB with the introduction of SDHC (there were a few 4GB SD cards but not very compatible) and then to support up to 2 TB with the introduction of SDXC. The SD to SDHC transition if you remember ...


19

I can't speak for Linux, but on Windows I've used the excellent "Recuva" product from Piriform to recover deleted files. Recommend giving that a go to see if the content is still retrievable and as Reid said - if there were more photos taken afterward then she's almost certainly up the creek.


19

Initially the reason was performance and capacity. A lot of the pro-level cameras went CF because you needed the performance and, usually because a pro shoots RAW, the capacity which the original SD couldn't match. Not to mention there was a point in time where SD was more expensive as a result of volume sales differences. SD is now cheaper thanks in a big ...


18

The funny thing about memory cards is that cost to size isn't always linear. For example, you might buy a 4GB card for $50, but the 8GB might only be $75 or it might be $150. That's just an example, the threshold for where the big price shift happens changes as technology and capacity improve. So, in terms of price, it will depend on the capacities you want. ...


17

They're formatted with FAT16 or FAT32 (FAT32 is required for card sizes >2GB), and have a fairly specific (though simple) directory structure something like this: ROOT --- DCIM -+- ###ABCDE | +- ###ABCDE | ... ### is from 100-999, and need not be consecutive. ABCDE is free text. This structure ...


16

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


15

That is normal. The camera doesn't know how many images there is left, as images take up different amount of space depending on how much detail they contain. So the camera displays a guesstimate based on the free space on the card and an average size for images taken with your current settings. If you take images with large areas of sky or other smooth ...


14

Check out TestDisk or the associated PhotoRec tool from CGSecurity. TestDisk will allow you to scan the file system and look for deleted files. (See How to Undelete files with TestDisk.) Provided the data hasn't been overwritten it should be possible to recover the files. You can also use TestDisk to take an copy of the underlying file system to stop any ...


14

Its for non-image data that may be used by the camera when processing, storage for user settings (i.e. 1D series...maybe 5D as well), and from what I've heard, storage of temporary audio streams when recording video. Its kind of a catch-all folder that stores anything that doesn't belong in the DCIM folder, and I think most (if not all) of it is temporary ...


14

Did you use the CF card in your computer and either store non-picture files on it, or delete the files without emptying the trash / recycle bin when you were done? A bunch of hidden files can fill up the card's space pretty quickly (happened to me a couple weekends ago; luckily I always carry a spare). It could also be a corrupted card, and some sectors ...


13

There are two utilities from CGSecurity that might help. TestDisk - Allows direct access to disk data and file recovery from corrupt partition tables. PhotoRec - Specifically targeted at recovering photos by identifying byte patterns in images (& video) files. Depending on what has caused your card to fail will depend on which of these tools will ...


13

The symptoms you have describe indicate a card you shouldn't trust any more. Bin it and buy a new one before you lose something important to you. The price of memory isn't high at the moment really so you might as well replace it.


13

Reasons to use the memory card: A good card reader will be faster than your camera's data cable (a cheap card reader - not so much) When you use the camera data cable you also use the batteries, I had an old camera that really drained the batteries when using the data connection (a set of batteries lasted a few days of shooting or about 30 minutes of data ...


12

It's transfer speed. 100X means 100 times faster than a 1x CD-ROM (whose data rate is 150KB/s). So a 100x card is 100 * 150 KB/s or 15,000 KB/s or 15MB/s (note that this is data rates, not storage). These are, of course, theoretical max writes, and real world, average case performance is not that high. You just need to get a CF card that can keep up with ...


12

A class 6 card in theory should be more than enough bandwidth for HD (1080) video for the 550D (48 MBit). Unfortunately some manufacturers do not not produce as high quality consistent memory as they should and thus most HDSLR folks prefer to use class 10 cards which should have enough headroom that you'll never see the buffer bars. I recommend not ...


12

Mostly because CF has faster read/write speed than SD card. SDHC has a higher capacity (more space) but not necessarily faster read/write speed. Some high-end CFs allow parallel read/write (the interface allow this), but not SD/SDHC. So some high-end camera usually take advantage of this in combination with their buffer. Now Rob Galbraith did lots of test ...


11

I successfully recovered all the files from a formatted card by copying it using dd and then using the sleuth kit under linux. Fortunately no pictures had been taken since the card was formatted. I used the fls and icat commands as described in test image results from Sleuthkit Informer Issue #14 and the TSK Tool Overview


11

If I'm feeling paranoid about backing up, I use a Nexto DI, which can backup a card directly to its own internal drive. It reads CF/SD/SDHC, doubles as a USB2/external SATA drive, and is much faster than most of the other similar products I could find. (There are a bunch of similar products available, but this one had the best reviews at the time, about 6 ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


10

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


10

Camera reviews on dpreview mention writing speeds (example: EOS 550D). If there's no documentation it should be possible to derive actual camera+card write speed by switching to RAW and shooting in sequence until your buffer fills up (then shooting fps should go down significantly). Then writing_speed = raw_file_size * fps_with_full_buffer.


10

CompactFlash came out in 1994, while Secure Digital came out in 1999. Five extra years of adoption helps explain why higher-end cameras support CF over SD (and vice versa). Pros tend to standardize; they buy a lot at once, have supporting equipment to match, and don't want to switch frequently. Thus professional standards have higher market inertia, and end ...


10

This is really a case of read your camera manual. If your camera did not come with a full one, there will be one on a CD. The behavior greatly varies. Usually cameras use filenames which gives them 4-digit numbering (some use 5 numbers), so you could in theory have 9999 photos in a single folder. However, cameras can break down these images in folders ...


10

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


9

I would see no reason to format the card on a regular basis, simply erasing all images on the card is sufficient. Bear in mind that most flash based media have a limit on the number of writes and so formatting is going to help you reach that limit a little bit faster. The only upside to formatting, which is probably where this idea came from, is that it can ...


9

The main reason for this option is commercial - it allows the camera to be tried out in a shop and see the result of their test. Without this, you wouldn't be able to properly try out cameras. Normally, cameras allow just a small number of test shots to be stored.



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