Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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16

The good news - all medium format gear is ridiculously cheap now that everyone switched to digital. Cheapest hardware is probably 645, Mamiya was always cheapest and is lens compatible right upto their most modern digital models. Although most people used them as eyelevel SLRs you can get a waistlevel finder for $10 My favorite 6x7 was always Mamiya RB67 ...


14

Firstly there's reproduction size. Yes you can get good results on screen with an iPhone and properly lit photo, it wont look good printed in a glossy magazine, or on a 10 foot advert! I see this time and time again when someone produces an attractive image from an otherwise maligned camera such as a phone camera and uses it to argue that more expensive ...


12

"Format" refers to the size of the recording medium in a camera. I say recording medium because the term originated in the film era and has continued to the digital age. There are no hard limits but medium format is typically anything larger than 35mm film up to 6cmx7cm film. Large format is typically everything from 4"x5" up. In addition to the size of ...


11

I don't know medium format cameras, but in general shutter latency is the time that it takes from when you push the shutter to the time the shutter actually activates. The lower the latency, the more responsive the shutter, but the less time the camera has to make last minute adjustments or changes in hardware state. A higher shutter latency will allow the ...


10

I think you are talking about the 4x5 Graflex Speed Graphic that David Burnett was shooting with. http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2012/08/09/david-burnett-an-analogue-view-of-the-olympics


10

Matt Grum has it right: micro-contrast, lens quality and reproduction size are the main reasons, but I wanted to add a couple more points: High-end MF cameras are outrageously expensive for amateurs photographers, they aren't for people who treat photography as a business. If you're a hobbyist or you use a computer for office work, the price of a ...


10

Advantages of Hasselblad medium format compared to the best 35mm systems (applies to most medium format systems): Larger lenses means sharper optics (when measured across the whole image circle). Higher resolution sensors currently available. Modularity, backs, viewfinders are interchangeable allowing you to upgrade independently. Hasselblad offers a few ...


8

Phase One says the sensor is put to sleep to save battery, and is given a wake-up signal when you press the shutter release button. This wake-up process they call Shutter Latency and recommend to keep it set to "Normal". The other setting is called "Zero" latency, and suggested to use it only when working with technical large format cameras, or certain ...


7

Price: Not everyone can afford the price of a medium format camera and back. High end studios can afford them and their clients will pay for the quality. Price: Not everyone can afford the lenses that medium format cameras use, which is often far more than a comparable lens for a DSLR. Ditto about the studios. Sensitivity: I asked the Phase One rep ...


6

Basically - Medium format cameras are generally big, and designed primarily for studio environments, therefore designed to be used in a "controlled environment" where lighting can be set up with enough light for perfect exposure. There is really no need for digital medium format cameras to have extreme high ISO performance. You don't see many night club ...


6

The "telecompressor" you mentioned is a focal reducer, a device that concentrates the image in order to project it onto a smaller sensor. This approach reduces the backfocus distance (the distance from the back of the lens to the sensor). So it only works on mirrorless cameras using lenses designed for DSLRs (which have sufficient backfocus distance to make ...


5

Larger formats exist mainly to increase the level of detail in the photographs produced. This was certainly true in the film era as film resolution was pretty much fixed (per unit area) but a larger negative could always produce more detailed prints. It is also largely true in the digital age as the highest megapixel sensors available are all larger than ...


5

I'm mostly going to address one point raised in Matt Grum's answer and (especially) the comments on that answer. On average, a MF camera/back does give more control over depth of field than a smaller format camera can. With the larger format, you don't need as fast of a lens to get just as shallow of depth of field. A "full frame" MF camera has a sensor ...


5

$20 is very reasonable. Consider this: Digital >> Shoot >> Cull >> Edit >> Prepare >> Deliver (takes A LOT of YOUR time depending on project size) Film >> Shoot >> Send >> Receive >> Review >> Deliver (takes few hours, if that, you go spend that time, shooting, with family or whatever) If you are looking for quality lab, then look no further than ...


5

Normally I would recommend a geared head for precision work, particularly for a heavy camera, but I assume $1000 is your total budget. So, instead, you should look at a Hydrostatic head. This will prevent shifting while tightening the ballhead but you still need to support the camera's weight while adjusting its position. Carbon Fiber legs are awesome but ...


5

Size, weight, speed and price. If you are going to carry equipment with you for the entire day you want it to be small and light enough to carry (and a price that won't bankrupt you if the camera is damaged is a big plus when you take a camera into dangerous areas). Also, for sports, event photography and photojournalism the shooting speed is very ...


5

Prestige, legacy or resolution: To show you can own something so expensive. In some market this will give you an edge to get clients to pay for the prices you ask for. To use your legacy cameras and lenses. This could be for sentimental reasons more than practical, I suspect, since if you can afford a Hasselblad, you can probably afford new gear too. The ...


5

Theoretically if you keep the size of the entrance pupil and field of view the same then you will capture the same total amount of light regardless of the format. If your medium format sensor in 1.6 times larger (which is the upper end available today, the Leica S2 you mention is only 1.25 times larger), then to match your 35mm DSLR and 85mm f/1.2 lens ...


4

DSLRs are generally regarded to be very unforgiving of clipped whites. With digital people generally recommend that you aim to underexpose with digital a little. If you do shoot in RAW you will have a better chance of getting some detail back in the whites. Various RAW converters support highlight recovery which can work very well. The idea is that the ...


4

Even though I did not overexpose them by at least 2/3rds of a stop, the pictures lacked a lot of details in high key Can you clairfy that? Particularly the first part. Yes, a MF camera will capture more total dynamic range than a FF, but light is light. If you underexpose and pull the shadows, you should get more detail than you're describing. The MF ...


4

I would say a TLR (Twin Reflex Camera) body is probably the most affordable medium format system available. You can find a Rolleiflex and Seagull Camera bodies for under $300 USD. Check out the TLR tagged images from flickr.


4

It's actually easier to make sharp lenses for a larger format. A good example of this is the Gigapixel project that used a large format film back from a spy satellite to produce images on film that can be scanned at a resolution of one billion pixels. The frame was 18" x 9" with a diagonal 19 times larger than a standard APS-C frame. The custom made 215mm ...


4

It really depends on how you define image quality. Currently medium format digital cameras and backs off higher resolution (up to 80 megapixels) than 35mm cameras (up to 36 megapixels). In good light with equally "good" lenses more megapixels will result in a sharper picture. Additionally a larger format makes it easier to design sharper lenses (in terms ...


3

Back before digital cameras, studio enthusiasts were used to 6x6 (6cmx6cm) (or even 6x8) camera which have about 4 times the surface area of 35mm film (24mmx36mm). If you look (for example) at the Zeiss lens for such cameras (as example for Hasselblad body) you can see that the same optical formulae are also used for 24x36 lenses (Zeiss optical formula is ...


3

At a distance this dual camera arrangement from here used by Getty Images to capture 3D footage may have looked large and/or strange. The article talks about a single system but seems to also include footage without any real discussion of a robotic camera which appears far closer to what you described. This appears to be a 35mm DSLR (probably 5D MkIII ...


3

Also a good alternative is to use slide film and a good film scanner. That way you can still have some benefits from both worlds (analog film and digital). If i wanted color pictures I would take this route. But if you want to print pictures your self, then b&w is much easier. If you haven't done anything in darkroom before i would suggest b&w. When ...


3

Welcome Tim, Yes, the Super CoolScan 9000 ED is the best medium format scanner out there w/in reason, I owned one 2 years ago for my 500CM Hasselblad shooting and it was awesome (I since gave up MF for a Leica and changed to a CoolScan 5000 ED). If you're looking to improve your scanning, and you haven't tried it already, get the fluid mount carrier for the ...



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