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41

The Canon Rebel or EOS XXXXD Series Beginner/Intermediate models for hobby photographers who are transitioning to dSLR's, and looking to start, but within a moderate budget. The difference between the different Rebel cameras you've listed are just subsequent upgrades, and features: more megapixels, HD video, faster burst rate, etc. These camera's are quite ...


19

Canon have different names for cameras in different parts of the world, so let's start with a translation table for those: EOS 1100D = EOS Rebel T3 = EOS Kiss X50 EOS 1000D = EOS Rebel XS = EOS Kiss F EOS 600D = EOS Rebel T3i = EOS Kiss X5 EOS 550D = EOS Rebel T2i = EOS Kiss X4 EOS 500D = EOS Rebel T1i = EOS Kiss X3 EOS 450D = EOS Rebel XSi = EOS Kiss ...


15

I believe this is for the simple reason that many people buying "pro" bodies will have been DSLR/SLR customers previously and will thus have an existing lens collection so are unlikely to need as many different options in terms of bundled lenses. The digital rebel end of the market is still capturing new DSLR customers who are upgrading from ...


13

As a fairly generic answer, I'd go for an older higher level camera every time. To me, higher spec cameras tend to have a longer life span (in terms of shutter actuations), and more solid build than entry level ones. Although saying that it is more likely that they have had heavier use before getting to you. I reckon also that features and specs of high end ...


12

Raw numerical stats don't tell the whole picture. The differences between the 7D and the D7000 are a lot less than they may seem from the comparisons you posted. Here is a basic analysis of the listed benefits of the D7000 over the 7D: IQ of 80 vs. 66 The larger pixels of the D7000, along with being a newer sensor design by about almost two years, do ...


11

Note that I cannot make a statement for Nikon but I have been reviewing digital cameras for 7 years, including all of Nikon's latest cameras. Speed is the driving factor and so the D4 is primarily aimed at action photographers. It can shoot considerably faster than the D600 or D800. Not only that, its greater sensitivity range lets it use faster ...


10

In my opinion it boils down to two factors (assuming you mean DSLRs in the low- and mid-range): Higher level cameras give you more features and more control than entry level cameras. Newer cameras have better low-light capability than older cameras (and generally better image quality due to technological advancement). Given an amount of money you balance ...


7

The Canon range is loosely in ranges aimed at entry-level (the Rebel series in North America, and Kiss series in Japan, and three or four digit model numbers elsewhere), "Prosumer" (those with 2 digit model numbers, such as the 50D) and professional (with single digit model numbers such as the 5D) At any one time, there may be more than one model in a ...


7

Canon has an odd numbering system and they adjusted it over the years too, so it not entirely consistent (no manufacturer is but Canon is one of the bigger offenders). All Canon DSLRs actually have a model number which is used in Europe. In America these are replaced by letters such as XS, XSi T3i, etc. Asia uses a different naming system (Kiss). For ...


7

Another aspect not frequently discussed is the number & type of auto focus (AF) points present. So, while the 600D & 60D may be very similar, the 60D has better AF points (all cross type vs 1 cross type for the 600D), while higher end bodies like the 1Ds are even better. In addition to this, some of the AF points only work when you use a lens with a ...


7

There are lots subtleties and each manufacturer has its own selection of things they like to exclude from lower-level models but a few key specifications explain most differences: Sensor size. A bigger sensor cost more and offers an advantage in terms of image quality. In most cases, it also forces you buy heavier and more expensive lenses. 100% ...


6

I have owned both the d200 and the d3000 (very similar body to the d5100). The d5100 has a better sensor and a better LCD but the d200 has a much better body. The d200 is more durable, has a ton of body controls, and has a 2nd display. You can change all of the important exposure settings very quickly with just a glance down at the body. This can't be ...


6

Well, some actually do: Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera with EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM Lens For example. But, I think the primary reason is that people who buy pro cameras probably have specific needs and desires and predicting that they'll all want "this lens" is certainly wrong. Not only that, most people that buy pro ...


5

You can take amazing photographs with any camera. The trick is to know and understand your equipment. An older professional camera might be more rugged and durable, but might have lower resolution or light sensitivity. It really depends on the specific cameras you are comparing. A few years ago I was dead set on buying a used 5DMk2 because I wanted a ...


5

Of course — there has to be. Are you aware of the saying "Fast, cheap, good: pick two?" Any design has compromises. This isn't a "marketing reason" — it's a basic fact of making products which the market researchers must work from. And when you add the additional constraint that it must be compact, well, something else has to give. Take a look at my recent ...


4

The D4 and the EOS 1Dx are aimed at a few working pros. They are built for the needs of less than one percent of the DSLR market. They are faster, can shoot more frames per second for longer periods, and are built like tanks. They will get beat up by a pro shooting many hours per day, for year. The next tier down are aimed at pros who work in nicer ...


4

I had to decide the same thing a short time ago, whether to go for a D7000 vs any other camera. The only restriction was that it had to be Nikon because I owned a couple of Nikon fit lenses that I wanted to reuse. First of take a look at: http://snapsort.com/compare/Nikon-D5200-vs-Nikon_D7000 http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d7000.htm The D7000 is ...


3

This is why they offer the body only option. Kit lenses are kind of like the crackerjack prize. It's not actually why you buy the camera, but it is a necessary piece of gear to make the camera work. They sell kits so that they can sell a workable package to someone who doesn't know what lenses they want. It's rarely if ever a good lens because it isn't ...


3

In the broadest sense, the higher up the range you go, the more durable, and the more "custom" you can set the cameras up. Things like the material that the camera body is made out of and the shutter improve as you go up the line. They also add a great deal of custom functions that allow you to customize the camera for your purposes and situations. Many of ...


3

Alan has alread covered the general differences between the ranges in his answer but here's some more detail about the lower end models. Entry-level: Canon Rebel XS or EOS XX00D Series (e.g. 1000D) 0.81x viewfinder The Canon Rebel or EOS XX0D Series (e.g. 550D, 500D, 450D, 400D) Slightly larger viewfinder than entry-level (0.87x for the 450D-550D, ...


3

Have you looked at Canon 60D? Same sensor as 7D, with fewer AF-points, and a tad slower (not as good for action photography). It has an advantage with the flip-rotate-screen over the 7D. The 60D is overall slightly better / easier to use for video. I got a 60D, and a friend have a 7D so I've used both quite a bit. I have no idea if the 60D have a funky ...


2

I barely know anything about the two cameras, but what you should consider here is that the D200 has features not available in the D5100. If these features are important to you, and you are good with the (supposedly) lower image quality, then you may be willing to pay the price difference. For example - if the D200 is considered a "semipro" camera, you can ...


2

Quality, features, price - pick any two. You can of course build a camera without any compromises; that has the best quality and is full of features, but it would be much more expensive than the cameras it had to compete with. It would not sell very well, as the segment that actually want quality and features at any price is quite small.


2

The biggest questions are what are your required features, and what are the generational differences. Feature requirements can help make it easy to decide what to buy. Deciding between an old pro camera and a new entry-level camera, but want an integrated vertical grip? The pro camera is the only sensible choice. Require a camera the other half won't mind ...


2

The new, entry level camera will likely have better hardware and software than the older, higher level camera. But the higher level camera will likely have a bigger sensor. The higher level camera will be built with a professional or pro-sumer in mind. It is not easy to find an older higher-level camera (new OR used) at a price that is even close to a new ...


2

My first DSLR was a used Canon 30D. I was considering something like this vs. a new Rebel, and I'm convinced I made the right decision. The 30D was so much better in build quality and durability, and it had extra controls for all the settings I found I needed to change regularly (vs. finding a setting in a menu somewhere). It served me well until I traded ...


2

The quick and easy answer is "pointless and too expensive". Matt's answer also covers a part of it. Pro-bodies are, as Matt points out, mainly bought by people who have spent some time with photography and hence already have lenses. They will not necessarily want a new lens. Wes also correctly points out that the 5D MK III is sold with a lens as a kit - as ...


1

It is in the nature of design to make compromises. In the context of Camera selection, your purchasing potshot is at a moving target. Until now, the buyer was always forced to compromise - even with the currently "top-rated" camera - and that kept them coming back for more. But first things first. Beyond the drip-drip of advancing specs, there's the ...


1

As others said, speed is basically the biggest difference. Everything about the D4 (and any of the Dx series) is simply faster than any other model. Frame rate is the obvious one, but the built-in AF motor is also much stronger than lower-end models, for example. In terms of bare specs, the D4 exceeds the D600 by a level or two in numerous areas, but the ...


1

Canon 60D: That bigger grip and the top LCD actually are worth it. I was in the same boat after my camera got jacked. I don't regret it at all. It just feels so much better than the rebels. That flip out screen is quite usefuly. I sometimes flip it out during portraits or events so that the subject can see what's being shot. If I was gonna switch, I might ...



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