Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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36

Since there are 3 important variables here: aperture, shutter speed and ISO, I would Google for Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet for example. Here are a few: Manual Mode Cheat Sheet (Muddyboots Photography Blog) Exposure Chart Cheat Sheet (Flickr) My Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet (glark.org) Aperture, ISO, and Shutter Speed Explained (not a sheet, but you can ...


36

I typically use aperture priority as well, but I also work a fair bit in manual mode. The typical case for me is if I am in an environment where the lighting situation is quite static, but the subject may have a lot of contrast. Here I switch to manual mode and shoot a few test frames to pinpoint the exposure (typically I try to spot meter on a white ...


29

The biggest benefit I can think of is consistency between shots. This is normally not much of an issue, but when you are wanting to capture the changing light in a scene for time lapse or do panorama stitching the consistency becomes really important.


28

Following the format you present of "if you want to get this result, you'll need to use this function", here are a couple ideas. I'll try to add to this list in the next day or so, if I think of more -- or perhaps I could be convinced to make this a community wiki answer. Anyway, thoughts: If you want to do some light-painting, you'll have to find and ...


23

I had exactly the same problem when I first tried to photograph the moon: all I ever got was an overexposed white circle. The answer is that the moon is much brighter than you realise. Also, unless you have a very telescopic lens, it's going to be pretty small in your photo. If you use one of the camera's automatic modes, the camera will try to get the ...


20

It is simply too dark for the camera to focus. And by default it will refuse to take the shot unless it has focused. There are some possible workarounds: - Some cameras can be forced to take the shot when you press the button, no matter what. The inevitable result is an unsharp photo. I don't suppose that this is what you want. I assume that you are using ...


19

There's really only one thing you need to memorize and it's easy: a list of standard f-stops in graduations of one f-stop (1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64, 90). Once you notice that every other one doubles (with some rounding starting at f/11), you only need to remember the first two, 1 and 1.4. (Usually you can see this sequence printed ...


19

Yes, professionals do use auto mode. Professional paparazzi use auto mode almost exclusively and will sometimes even tape up the controls on the camera to prevent any settings being accidentally altered. You don't have to know how to shoot manual to make money out of photography, if for example you know which restaurants which celebrities go to... Other ...


18

Shooting manual mode doesn't make you a better photographer, understanding what all the settings effectively do will. Your camera has three basic settings: Aperture: Use this to control depth of field (DoF). This is usually the most important setting to most photographers, as it influences both subject matter and composition. You're not going to be taking ...


18

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


17

What are the basic calculations you're referring to? Other than doubling/having shutter speed or ISO when I open/close the aperture a stop I don't find myself doing any, I just fiddle with the settings 'till the image looks right on the LCD. After a while you get a feel for what settings work in what circumstances and the process becomes much quicker. ...


17

I have taken a few years to perfect my moon shots. Many nights stood out in the cold!! On the months where the full moon is not obscured by cloud!! Here is what I do: You need a long lens! The moon may look large in the sky, but it will still be a dot in your viewfinder! Here is one instance where megapixels still count - as for the same reason above ...


17

It sounds like you don't understand exposure. If you change to an all manual mode, then its expecting you to adjust shutter speed, aperture, and ISO all in concert - 'manually'. If you set a faster shutter speed, you'll need to raise your ISO or open your aperture more to adjust for the fact that you're letting in less light. The same with a lower shutter ...


15

Applying manual controls allows one more freedom to enhance, manipulate and master applied photographic applications. By understanding the interaction of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO speed, photography — identified as "drawing with light" — can be utilized to its fullest potential. Full creativity with the use of manual control can then be used to ...


15

Re. your answer - you don't have to have the focus set to Manual just because you're in Manual mode, but autofocus systems generally don't work in the dark. Therefore the camera will fail to focus and refuse to take a picture. By switching to manual you remove that problem. Switching to Auto mode may allow autofocus because it turns the AF illuminator on. ...


12

Aperture priority can be ideal for a walkaround mode, especially when combined with exposure compensation. I only tend to flip to manual mode when I'm shooting a lot with the same lighting, or rapidly changing lighting -- so things like food photography (where dark meat or glistening glazes can trick the metering), or fireworks where the automatic metering ...


12

I use a program mode the majority of the time that I am not in a studio. An example of that would be aperture priority mode - where I get to set the aperture and ISO that stays consistent, and my camera is allowed to determine the shutter speed to keep the exposure proper. Full Auto mode, which many entry level DSLR cameras have, is great if you hand your ...


11

There are many "truths" in photography, and you'll hear them a lot, variations of: The best camera you have is the one you have on you A great camera does not a great photographer make etc etc. (more variations of how the equipment does not matter) To a large extend, the feelings above are true. HOWEVER, I believe that to be a great photographer you must ...


11

You're not going to get better shots simply by switching to a DSLR. In fact, they may get noticeably worse as you start fiddling with the settings. What you (and everyone else) really need is practice and study. This graph is meant to be funny, but it's also frighteningly true. As for a DSLR: it really comes down to how much money you want to spend, ...


11

Manual mode can give you more consistent metering when you're taking several photos in a scene. For example, suppose that you're photographing a person whose body is fully illuminated but whose face is partly in shade. If you take a full-body image and then a head and shoulders portrait, the metering could end up different because the percentage of the frame ...


10

You might want to try borrowing or renting a camera first. Even the cheapest DSLR will cost several hundred dollars, which can be a lot of money if you aren't sure it is right for you. That being said, DSLRs now are a lot better than they were in pure auto mode, which can make it pretty easy to jump right in. I went from a P&S to a DSLR not all that ...


10

"Auto" can mean a wide range of things. Most DSLRs offer a "full auto" facility that tends to manage shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. But most of the modes on a DSLR that are other than absolute manual mode offer a substantial automated component. And even "Manual" may have auto features lurking in the shadows (literally in some cases). Your friends ...


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


9

If your subjects stay the same but your background changes in luminosity greatly. I was shooting sports indoor with a door to the outside open, so my subjects would have gotten real dark if they went by of the door. Also, if you want to maintain a certain shutter speed (freeze action) and aperture (for subject isolation), and you don't have TAv mode or ...


9

I'll give you one example of when I've used manual, and see if it makes sense. A while back I was shooting my step-son's "little league" basketball games, which were held indoors. The gym lighting provided reasonably even (if not very bright) illumination, but things like glare on the floor or dark color uniforms kept fooling the camera's light meter into ...


9

Using automatic mode in camera is akin to using a automatic car. It works well if you just have to get to work but not when you are racing or if the track gets interesting :).. Just a few examples when you can't do without manual modes: Control the depth of field: Your camera can't read your mind and know that you want to blur the background. Multiple ...


8

I prefer manual mode for a few areas: 1) stage fotografie. Usually, on stages the light has very high contrast. Any automatic mode most of the time will blow the faces because it is trying to get all the dark background to 18% grey. 2) panoramic fotos. Having inconsistent exposure for the frames is a real pain in stitching them together, so I'll use manual ...


8

Exposure is defined as the total quantity of light that hits the film or sensor during the time the shutter is open. Exposure compensation in Tv or Av modes will change the shutter speed or aperture, which in turn changes the total amount of light that hits the sensor, i.e. it changes the exposure. When shooting in manual mode the aperture and shutter ...


7

I found that when I switched to a DSLR from a point-and-shoot digital, the quality of my photos improved dramatically. Not because the camera made me a better photographer, but because the camera was more capable: less shutter lag, better auto focus, etc. It meant that when I started playing with a single setting at a time, I could really concentrate on ...



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