Serene Life

by garik

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40

Macro shooting. The depth of field is so shallow that there is no way for a camera to know what exactly would you like to show to the world. Studio shot. You know where exactly the things are and already focused. You don't want the camera to focus back and forth every time you press a shutter release. Portrait with the open aperture with a very long lens. ...


34

Split-prism focusing depends on your using fairly fast lenses. When the normal "kit" lens was a 50/1.8 (or 50/1.7, or something similar) that worked well. With slower lenses, one side or the other (or both) will be "blacked out" nearly all the time, and it provides no help in focusing. A typical kit lens nowadays is a zoom with a maximum aperture of ...


19

The most obvious reason is to be sure that you can reach the spot where it focuses at infinity. It would be hard to make the lens stop at exactly infinity, and any little change (temperature, humidity, filters, et.c.) might move that point slightly, making it impossible to focus exactly at infinity. On a prime lens you would need only a small margin, so ...


17

Check if your viewfinder has a dioptric adjustment knob - this is a little adjustment on the viewfinder that allows you to adjust for your eyes. It might be set for someone short sighted. If it is there then make sure the in-viewfinder display is visible, and adjust so that the display is sharp. Then try focusing on other things. You could also see if ...


17

Poorly lit social events Often times at a party or wedding reception, the lighting is too dark for the autofocus to work properly, so an AF-assist lamp is needed. Shining a light on someone distracts them and makes them aware of the camera / self-conscious, and the shot can be ruined.


17

When AF is hunting because of low light or lack of contrast in the subject. When you're doing intensive macro shooting. When you don't have enough time to change focus point. When you want to fine tune your focus.


16

here's a couple of potential disadvantages: blackout: Split-prism focusing screens tend to turn black in the center with slower lenses (usually f/5.6 or slower, depends on the screen). Unless you're using a slow lens, or setting the aperture manually, this probably won't be a major problem. effects on metering: Focusing screens can affect the camera's ...


13

You'll have a hard time focussing a wide aperture lens wide open without a live preview with magnifying option. Here's why: Your viewfinder has a fixed depth of field that you perceive when viewing through it. It's the matte screen that poses a limit. In general, it's close to F/2.8 in terms of the depth-of-field that you see here, so if you use a wider ...


13

While you can obviously manual focus with an autofocus lens, manual focus lenses are catered towards manual focus users. Some possibilities: Longer focus throw (Autofocus lenses typically have short focus throws in order to focus faster.) More distance markings or depth of field markings (DoF markings are particularly useful) Wider focus ring Better ...


13

Absolutely! And especially in street photography or low-light situations, you don't even need to be quick. Say, you are shooting people walking along the sidewalk while you are sitting at a cafe across the street, you can pre-focus once and just snap away as interesting people walk by. Autofocus would try to refocus every time you took a shot, and that lag ...


13

This is a classic use-case for continuous autofocus (AF-C). Nikon uses that term, Canon refers to this mode as AI-Servo. This does not guarantee anything though, just improves your odds depending on: Which camera you use: Advanced cameras have predictive-autofocus which calculate the speed at which a subject moves and keeps moving the focus in that ...


13

Pixel peeped images aren't likely to look sharp unless you're viewing from a distance... Something to bear in mind. However, for manual focus improvement, you may want to consider a custom focussing screen such as the Katz Eye split prism screen. The basic idea here is much like a rangefinder camera, the prism splits the image when it is out of focus and ...


13

When using manual focus you have to adjust the plane of focus using the focus ring to acquire correct focus. You will have to choose this yourself and if I understand you correctly you have not done this. Of course there is a slight chance that the lens will already be set to focus at the depth you want but they are slim indeed. Using a wide aperture will ...


12

The auto focus points visible in your viewfinder approximate the key areas that the AF sensor is able to measure. The resolution that the AF sensor processes at is pretty low, and how it processes is not exactly how our eyes see focus, so what it "sees" as being in focus may or may not be entirely sharp in the final image captured by your sensor. As such, ...


11

The manual focus lenses I've handled (M42 Takumars) actually have stopped right at infinity; it's the AF lenses that have slush beyond. My understanding is that there's two reasons for this: Conditions (mostly temperature) can move the focus point slightly The autofocus system needs to be able to "miss" infinity a bit without slamming into a mechanical ...


11

Manual-priority allows the lens to auto focus but still allows you to adjust the focus manually. Many other lenses lock the focus ring when using auto focus to prevent damage to the internal motor. This lens is designed to allow full time manual override which is very useful to tweak focus without switching out of auto mode.


11

How can I tell when the flame is in focus? When and how do I detect where to leave the focus ring in order to get a crisp and sharp photo? In general you know that the flame will be in focus when the wick is in focus, so I would tackle this as follows: Set the candle in the location you plan on taking pictures of it. If possible set it in a location ...


11

If there are, I've never seen one. They do not offer the same comfort for focusing. On cheap lenses, I noticed you have to turn the front element to focus which does not give much grip and also rotated the front element which is not good if you have a polarize filter. Better lenses have a nice texture focus ring to let you easily change focus. There is ...


11

Yes, manual focusing is more accurate than phase detect AF (except for the combination of very recent Canon camera + lens). Over at LensRentals blog Roger performed AF tests back in July / August 2012. For almost any combination of camera and lens, manual focus can (given enough time) be better than phase detect AF. Read the whole blog series if you want to ...


10

In sports/action photography, especially in good light conditions, the autofocus will (probably) manage to focus on the action much faster than you could. Thus manual focus would then make you miss shots. Basically any type of photography that requires you to be very fast.


10

Yes, the D5000 has a Rangefinder option. When in manual focus mode, this replaces the exposure meter in your viewfinder with a rangefinder meter. If the markings appear to the left, focus is in front of the subject. If the markings appear to the right, focus is behind the subject. To focus, you simply turn the focusing ring in the direction indicated by the ...


10

You'll never regret buying the focus confirm adapter once you forget how much you had to pay for it :-). "Auto confirm" is akin to "poor man's AF", and allows you to achieve, in many cases, close to AF results with far less effort or thought or concentration than pure MF takes in extreme conditions. With auto-confirm you have to "think" a lot less and can ...


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


9

I propose some tricks that can be used with lenses that have mechanical coupling with the focus ring (Anything in this answer does not apply to focus by wire lenses like Zuiko Digital lenses that require power from camera body to focus): Rock the Focus Step 1: I Just try to focus quickly as best as possible, then, re locate fingers on the focusing ring ...


9

Having taken quite a few self portraits lately, I'd recommend the following... If you're trying for a shallow DoF to blur out the background, increase your aperture to 2.8-3.2 and move further from your background - it'll be it alot easier to nail the focus on your whole face. If you have a face detection in Live Mode, try that. Try setting just the ...


9

Focus and recompose will work just as well in most cases; the exception is when the aperture is so wide that the object being focused on actually leaves the plane of focus when you recompose (most likely in macro photography). If you are able to select AF points manually, then choose the one that's closest to the item you are focussing on to minimise this ...


9

You will want to use an automatic continuous/servo mode to photograph birds in flight (BIF). Most modern cameras support some kind of servo mode, even entry-level cameras. Using servo mode is only part of the solution to tracking BIF, however. More advanced cameras offer additional AF features, such as multipoint AF Expansion or Zone AF that will use more ...


8

Because auto-focus doesn't work for what you do, or simply because you don't use it. Then you can get a better quality lens for the same money. Auto-focus works fine when some part of the image is exactly in focus, but if you for example want to put the focus between two objects so that they end up at the front and back edge of the DOF, auto-focus is ...



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