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by Jon

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37

Since there are 3 important variables here: aperture, shutter speed and ISO, I would Google for Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet for example. Here are a few: Manual Mode Cheat Sheet (Muddyboots Photography Blog) Exposure Chart Cheat Sheet (Flickr) My Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet (glark.org) My Exposure Triangle Cheat Sheet (glark.org) link has been ...


19

There's really only one thing you need to memorize and it's easy: a list of standard f-stops in graduations of one f-stop (1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64, 90). Once you notice that every other one doubles (with some rounding starting at f/11), you only need to remember the first two, 1 and 1.4. (Usually you can see this sequence printed ...


18

What are the basic calculations you're referring to? Other than doubling/having shutter speed or ISO when I open/close the aperture a stop I don't find myself doing any, I just fiddle with the settings 'till the image looks right on the LCD. After a while you get a feel for what settings work in what circumstances and the process becomes much quicker. ...


7

You mention second hand, and I commend that choice, however I think it's worth noting that there are some at-least-relatively quite inexpensive (though perhaps over £30-40; I don't know the exchange rates off hand). One is the Vivitar 285HV (or I guess now these are the Cactus KF36) (or an old higher-voltage 285 or 283, and perhaps other models, second hand ...


7

Check out Nikon speedlights from the 1990s: SB-24 and SB-26. The lower the number, the cheaper. The higher the number, the more features. The SB-26 has a broader manual range, and the SB-28 has a built-in optical trigger. They have manual control, hotshoe and PC sync sockets, and are broadly compatible with Canon and Nikon DSRLs. Strobist on the Nikon ...


7

Yes, but only with extra gear like radio triggers or an external optical slave. The built-in slave can only operate in Nikon's CLS mode.


7

To me, a "manual flash" means a simple non-TTL flash. When shopping for those, the five essential things to look at: Hot-shoe compatibility. Sony/Minolta systems use one layout, all the other manufacturers use what's considered a "standard" hot shoe with central triggering pin. Guide Number. This will tell how much light the flash can spit out in a pop. ...


6

Your test button should firing at whatever power you select manually. I can't speak to that specific model, but it has on a few different flash brands I've tried. Its pretty easy to tell if it does. Just set it to high, take a picture and press the test button. Set it to low, take a picture and press the test button. Is there a big difference? ...


6

Yes, it will work, or at least, it's worked in the case I've tried (canon flash on a nikon body). You're right that the specific TTL metering and the like doesn't work, but the flash definitely triggers. I remember it distinctly, because both of my flashes went down while shooting a large wedding and the primary had a spare canon flash. She lent it to me, ...


6

For the exposure, you can try an analog light-meter, like the Gossen Lunasix. Yes, I know it sounds like I did not understand your question. But I did, please keep reading. This kind of light-meter is made of two parts: A proper light meter that displays the luminance of the scene with a thin needle on a logarithmic scale (the scale with a yellow ...


6

"Magic" automatic flashes, whether TTL or using a built-in sensor, are relatively recent. Before that, a handy system was developed for getting correct flash exposure manually. This is the guide number system, which is used for calculating the right mix of lens aperture, subject distance, and flash power. The guide number itself is given in terms of ...


5

You used to be able to buy them -- I found one in my mini camera museum earlier today: You could make something up similar?


5

A difference of one stop means halving (or doubling) the power/amount of light. -1 stop = 1/2 power. -2 stops = 1/4th power. -3 stops = 1/8th power. -4 stops = 1/16th power


4

+-EV is used to measure compensation of automatically determined flash power (using either TTL or light sensor on flash). Fractions are used in manual mode and refer to how much of maximum power the flash is using. Since these measures are used in different modes and there is no easy way to determine exactly how much power your flash uses in auto mode, you ...


4

Have a look at Alien Bees. I have 4 of the B800s and they're fun to work with, can be triggered remote, and are very nicely priced. All manual, but as you say, it's not really an issue. Anyways, I very much like mine, so they come recommended from me at any rate. :) As a side note, they're probably less than a regular hot shoe flash as well given the ...


4

Automatic modes are for when you want convenience and fast setup; manual mode is for when you need precision and repeatability. Therefore, automatic modes are preferred when moving around, the scene is dynamic or you don't have time to tweak the lighting; manual mode is more suitable for studio or location setups. Having a manual flash on-camera vs. having ...


4

By saying "manual flash gun" I assume you mean a speedlite kind of electronic flash with manual controls. Modern flash units pack a lot of goodies and provide excellent chance for customizing your lighting setup. I am familiar with the Canon lineup so the examples below are of Canon flashes but they apply to other brands as well. The first factor to ...


4

A few quick thoughts cost It's first on the list because if you can't afford it, well: you can't afford it ;) power How much light does it put out? Is that enough to light your subjects at the distance you want to shoot? reliability It's worth hitting the reviews for this one, but in this day and age, your strobe should trigger every single time ...


4

There are many flashes across many brand lines that exhibit what you have discovered concerning your 430EX II. Although I don't think there is a great conspiracy amongst the flash manufacturers, the "Truth" is that the manual minimum setting is actually the minimum manual setting. In other words, many flashes that can be controlled both manually and via TTL ...


4

The guide number is inversely proportional to the power squared. This is due to the way that light intensity diminishes with distance, at twice the distance light is spread over four times the area, so each bit of that area receives 1/4 of the light. So the actual formula needs to take into account the square root of the power level: Guide Number = ...


4

If you're setting up the lights, and they're a fixed distance away from your subject, then use manual. Other than if you fire your flashes with insufficient power, your exposure will be consistent from frame to frame. That's the boring example. Nothing is moving. TTL doesn't gain anything over manual. If the distance isn't fixed, then it's still ...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


3

If you understand exposure and the relationship between shutter speed/ISO/ and f-stop. You can follow this. If not, you'll need to learn that. You'll also need to understand how much a "stop" is. SB-24 has an advertised Guide Number of 118 (ft) @ ISO 100. Calculate settings for proper exposure and use that as a base. You can find TONS of info on the net on ...


3

If all you care for is the ability to control flash power (i.e, no zoom or fancy digital games like stroboscope), then there is another alternative to manual flash: use the cheapest flash you can find with ND gels! You can buy these gels in sheets and cut to the size of your flash head, and if the reduction is not enough, then stack a few of them. This ...


3

I don't think that data is available. However, I've found that you get a feel for good starting point just by using your gear. Once you get to know your gear you can look at a situation and say to yourself, "OK, I'm going to have my flash about 6' away, ISO 400 and f/5.6... I'll start with the flash at 1/8th power and adjust from there". That kind of ...


3

One way to see this is to use manual (M) mode when using a flash. As you adjust the aperture and shutter speed, the exposure metering will be displayed in the viewfinder. If you are using ETTL, then the flash will make up for the difference between the metered exposure and the "Correct" exposure. If you know what the difference was you can calculate when ...


3

Yongnuo YN460 You have to look out for build issues with these, but they should be available second hand for your budget. There is a newer version, the YN560, which is a slight upgrade, and slightly more expensive (GBP 55+ new).



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