Evening

by w.hrybok

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

32

Do not clean your lens (too much). Cleaning marks are by far the most common source of damage to lenses. Shooting under normal conditions, it takes a large amount of dust and grime to have any effect. The same approach applies to filters; good filters use the same type of glass and coatings as your lens (though perhaps not the same absolute quality). ...


18

An auto-focus motor is just what it sounds like: a small electric or piezoelectric ("ultrasonic") motor which moves the lens elements to facilitate autofocus. In some camera systems, this motor is in the camera body, and the lens moved by a physical coupling. However, you actually read some misinformation. Canon EOS cameras do not have a motor in the body, ...


17

The answer you found on Yahoo is mostly wrong. The basic statement (same as dpollitt's answer here) is correct — theoretically, image quality shouldn't degrade but a number of factors might make it worse. And the list of things that might go wrong is sound enough. But the mapping of symptoms to problems is very inaccurate. Point by point: One would be ...


15

I have an L lens that is 30 years old and still works fine. It's a fully manual lens however. Basically the glass and metal will not age, the only concern is the electronics. Whilst ICs don't really wear out, capacitors do age, I believe caps failing is one of the common causes for old electronics to stop working. I recently dug out my 1989 Nintendo ...


14

This doesn't quite answer your question, but it's relevant: there is value in using your equipment in the way that best serves your photography, even if it's not ideal treatment for the equipment. So for example the freezing and bumping along on a dirt bike aren't super great for the lens, but it sounds like those things were essential to having the ...


13

A controversial subject! One tip: don't over-clean. There's no need to keep your lens free of minor dust or worry about minor goop spots or even scratches. For an extreme example, check out this lens.


10

Microfiber cloths are pretty much all I've ever used to wipe off things like fingerprints and smudges.


10

I have never sent my camera in for Preventive Maintenance. I tend to prefer the 'if it ain't broken don't fix it' method of camera maintenance. One item that needs constant maintenance is removing dust on the sensor. The 40D, with its sensor dust removal shaking is better than most, but eventually, it needs to be cleaned. From what I have read from others, ...


10

I do it regularly, I don't regard it as difficult. It's not that risky in the grand scheme of things but it's riskier than it used to be, especially with larger full frame sensors. Before the useless "self cleaning" function was implemented, the low pass filter assembly sat right on the sensor. Now there is an air gap to facilitate vibrating the LPF in order ...


10

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


9

Dust inside the lens shouldn't be a problem, as it will always be thrown out of focus enough as not to make a difference. Even on the smallest apertures, the depth of field won't extend far enough forwards to make it visible. If it really bothers you, take it to an independent photo shop and see if they offer lens servicing.


9

Hopefully you have wiped the stuff before turning the camera off, otherwise there is probably some of it inside it. There is nothing self-cleaning here and neither is this camera sealed against dust and particles from entering. It's a great camera you have, so I would bring it to Canon for a cleaning. They will take the camera apart and clean it. Here this ...


9

The residue left behind when your fingers touch the glass of your lens contains several organic and chemical compounds. Normal skin oil has a pH level of around 4 to 5.5, which is mildly acidic. The longer it is allowed to be in contact with materials reactive with acids, the more reaction will take place. And yes, acid will eat through the coatings on ...


8

First off, I don't deeply clean my lenses or filters very often. When I do, I use microfiber cloths or special lens cleaning tissue (a microfiber tissue that is capable of cleaning greasy marks, but does not scratch the glass.) I try to keep this kind of cleaning to a minimum, however, as the more frequently you clean that deeply, the greater chance you run ...


8

Lens longevity is something that is very hard to nail down, as there are countless and often unpredictable circumstances that affect it. Generally speaking, however, there are two major factors that will affect how long a lens lasts: Build Quality Not all lenses are created equal, and build quality matters A cheap entry-level lens uses cheaper parts, and ...


7

There's a great site I recommend to folks trying to figure this out: http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/ (disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with it in any way). it has all of the background info and general instructions. The Rebel XT is a camera that was introduced before Canon started using the automated sensor cleaning, so it's going ot require ...


7

I would suggest taking your camera into a professional for camera cleaning. Who knows how serious the issue is - plus, I mean....termites...are you sure it isn't some other bug? Either way, I definitely wouldn't use any harsh chemicals or substances on my camera - I would rather spend a little money not to ruin such an expensive device...hence the advice to ...


6

Lens life isn't measured in exposure time. Camera bodies will fail before a lens will, if properly cared for. It sounds like your lens was abused a bit too much for it's quality-level. A more rugged lens would have likely fared better. I'm a Canon shooter, so I can only speak to Canon lenses, but their L lenses are made to take some abuse. You can find ...


6

I use a lens pen most of the time, just to keep everything clean when it needs it. If I do need to give anything a more thorough clean, which happens maybe once every six months at most, is to use Eclipse fluid and Pec-Pads. I also carry a microfiber cloth attached to my camera's strap, so I've always got it with me, for getting rid of the worst of anything ...


6

Since the question is a bit too broad to "fully answer," I'll just volunteer some tips. Hopefully with everyone's ideas combined, you'll come up with a good idea of how to maintain your camera. I've had a similar camera (Canon t1i), and it's survived two years of intense use by me and a handful of teenage students working with these guidelines... Get a ...


6

"Clean, Lubricate, Adjust", as Maxwell said. It is usually encountered when discussing Leica camera bodies, those things need a checkup every two decades or so. But, yes, lenses can be CLA'd too. For lenses, it basically means dismantling the thing, cleaning dust and other deposits from the lens surfaces, replacing the goop that lubricates the focus and ...


6

Practically speaking, digital cameras do not lose quality over time. Some factors can come into play such as: Equipment can wear causing it to be out of spec Environmental factors such as dirt, sand, dust, moisture can degrade quality Heat or excessive use(causing heat) can cause all electronic devices to experience wear Other regular use issues from ...


6

Spots like this are due to something on or very, very near the sensor. See Dust-like speck visible every few pictures — is it dust, or worse? for another example. Dust in or on the lens can't cause this problem, because, like lens scratches, they'll be so far out of focus that the effect is undetectable (in the same way a window screen becomes invisible when ...


6

Assuming you're just talking about the front element - I use these disposable Zeiss wipes. They do better than a lens pen (which handles dust ok, but doesn't do smudges nearly as well) and a box of 200 will last a long, long time with hobby level use. My local Walmart sells the box of 200 for under 4 dollars in the camera and the optometrist section. They ...


6

Nikon cameras and lenses are covered by a 1 year warranty. Lenses have a 4 year extension of that warranty. If you have an issue under warranty it doesn't matter if it's in the 1st year or the 5th, the coverage will be the same. If a lens is repaired under warranty, there will be no charge for the repair - you will have to cover the cost of shipping the ...


5

Try taking a picture will a reall small aperture, like f/22, this will show you if the speck is on the sensor or not. When the aperture is wide open, dust is blurred so much that it is hard to spot. If it's not on the sensor, it's on the mirror or on the focusing screen, and those are much easier to clean, as you don't have to be just as extremely careful ...


5

I always leave the ball head attached to my Manfrotto tripod. It does have three little retaining screws holding it in place but even if it didn't I wouldn't be inclined to remove it unless I had a particular reason for doing so. My tripod mostly lives under the cargo net in the back of my car fully assembled and ready to go as and when I need it. This ...


5

I am quite positive the AF/MF switch is broken. This has happened to a few friends of mine as well and can be fixed easily. If your lens is still under warranty, take it to a Canon service center. Though the other similar cases I have heard were mostly third party lenses (2 Tamrons and one Tokina) and it's a bit unusual for a Canon L glass, but, as I said, ...


5

Ensure that the padding is still in good condition and positioned to stop the camera / lens from moving around to much. To clean the outside of the bag a soft brush and some water should do the trick. As for the inside depending on the material type, a damp cloth or a can of compressed air should clear out any dust. If you have a small attachment you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible