Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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1

If I understand your example correctly, the focal plane changes with color. I think what you show here is axial (longitudinal) chromatic aberration. APO lenses are not necessarily a solution here. Canon does not mark any lenses as such and as far as I know none of their macro lenses are perfectly corrected for axial CA. The lens you have is pretty good. ...


3

The camera lens is a converging lens. Light rays from the subject enters the lens and the lens, due to the shape and density of the glass lens, emerge tracing out a revised path. This path resembles a cone of light. We focus the camera by moving the lens forward or backward. This action adjusts the position of the apex of the cone. We want the apex to just ...


11

You are seeing chromatic aberration — a prismatic effect which, as you nicely illustrate, reduces sharpness even in black and white photography. A lens which has greater correction for this is called an apochromatic lens — often something like "APO" in the lens name. Note that in lenses for telescopes and microscopes, you'll often also see achromatic ...


4

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


3

This image appears to use a single wide diffuse light source above and slightly forward of the subject with a white reflecting card below the lens, so as to not show in the shot, tilted slightly toward the subject to fill the shadow area under the subject. You might have to "play" a bit to find the optimal location and angle. But, that's what it's all about. ...


0

In the Fuji X100 line, the main purpose of Macro mode is to switch you to the electronic viewfinder, rather than the optical one. Basically, you can't use the optical viewfinder on macro shots without misframing, due to the parallax caused by the viewfinder being offset from the main image-taking lens. At macro distances, the brightline shift in the OVF ...


2

It's a little more complex than the question seems to indicate. Intended display size also comes into play. This is because the Diffraction Limited Aperture (DLA) of a sensor is only the beginning of the effects of diffraction and the image must be viewed at full size (1 image pixel=1 monitor pixel) for the effect of that diffraction to be seen. Unless you ...


1

Yes, you can use a Macro lens as long as you are able to attach the Nikon CFI Plan 10x microscope objective to the front filter threads and have it close to the front element. If the Nikon 105mm f/2.8 macro has a recessed front element, it may not be possible to get good results. There will be no vignetting with lenses that 100mm or more. Source: ...


-1

It's a microscope objective, so no, you can't use your Nikon 105mm f/2.8 macro lens as a tube lens. Only tube lenses are tube lenses. However, with extension tubes (not lens) and close up filters, you may be able to achieve the same magnification with you Nikon 105mm (10x is possible as in this case, while 100x times require an actual microscope objective). ...


1

You would be able to form an image on the sensor with it focused to infinity but you're likely to have some vignetting - it could be quite bad. It's worth trying, but don't spend a lot on the adaptors! In fact you may want to try a cardboard adaptor first to judge the field of view. The magnification onto the sensor won't be 10x using a 105mm tube lens. ...



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