The Sleeping Giant's Sea Lion

by Jakub

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I've recently undertaken a similar project and found that the Nikon ES-1 slide copying attachment is a great piece of equipment. It screws on to the front of a lens and holds a slide parallel to the sensor/film plane, and also provides a diffuser to help adequately light the slide. I'm using a D800 (full frame) and 60mm AF-S G lens and mounting the ES-1 to ...


1

If you can find a way to make your composition work with limited DOF, then that's great, and this is often the key to good macro photography, but if what you have in mind really needs more depth, read on. If you can get enough depth of field with a small aperture, then that's the way to go. If you are buying a macro lens, pay attention to how far you can ...


3

"Close focus" is very vague, but many zooms can focus close. However, the greatest magnification ratio isn't always at the longest focal length. For almost every zoom, "macro" has been a marketing term. "Real" macro means the ability to get a magnification ratio of at least 1:2. "Macro" zooms get down to ~1:4. The exceptions that I know of are Nikon's ...


0

I am not a specialist in macro photography, but... I would recommend a macro lens. Try and do it somewhere with bright natural sunlight (outdoors, or by a door or window). Have a low ISO to keep noise to a minimum, the lower the better. If it's sunny, don't do it in harsh sunlight - this will give harsh shadows. I'd recommend late afternoon. If it's cloudy ...


0

Firstly, focus stacking is generally used for macro photography. So, you'll want to keep the camera in the same position to have consistent framing. As mattdm has commented, you get different background compressions. The same thing when you use the same focal length, but different sensor sizes and subject distance. Invariants in subject size and depth of ...


1

You are simply making the wrong assumptions. Just "playing around" and thinking you see a correlation doesn't mean that it actually exists. You've just fixed the sensor format at APS-C, aperture at f/22 and tried varying the focal length and subject distance a bit and thought that you saw a correlation. However if you try these settings for example: f/2.8, ...


0

It wasn't a "switch", it was a mechanical latch that allowed you to use a different helicoid path for focus. So yes, it was essentially a built-in adjustable extension tube, but it could only be accessed when the lens was in a limited range of configurations. Often it was just one configuration; on some lenses, it was engaged beyond the long end of the zoom ...


3

I used to have a Nikon 28-105mm lens with macro capability and a switch for it. The switch could be moved only when the zoom was in the 50-105mm range. When in that range and switched, the lens focus ring could turn further into a designated macro focus range. So simply, within that 50-105mm focal range some of the lens's groups of elements have moved far ...


1

I managed to dig up the answer, at least for Vivitar's 70-210: "But in macro mode, three groups of elements move as a unit to shift the lens's optical center further from the film plane" From ...


1

Modern lenses also have this, usually zooms in the 70 - 300mm range that have a pseudo-macro (say, 1:2) function. The switch stops the autofocus 'hunting' throughout the entire focus range. Say you're photographing birds in a forest with the focal length at 280mm. They are 30 yards away. The trees are making the AF work a little. Rather than the AF trying ...


2

Focal Length controls the field of view in front of the lens. A longer focal length has a narrower field of view than a shorter one. Behind the lens, it is designed to project this image to a certain size and distance, as given by camera mount specifications. So we perceive this narrower field of view as having more "reach" as you can see farther into the ...


0

I think the photo you're trying to imitate is a composite, for the simple reason that the face of the closed bolt in a M1911 sits a bit further away from the muzzle than the trigger guard. There is no way the muzzle, the face of the bolt, and the entire bore could be in sharp focus, while the front of the trigger guard is not.


1

So of course we all know that when we zoom in on something, it appears to get bigger and takes up more of the viewfinder/camera sensor. However, I believe this question is asking about what is called magnification factor. You most commonly see on this macro lenses where the whole point is to enlarge something that in real life is very small. The ...


0

Some reasons off the top of my head: Lenses are full of flaws, designers try very hard to reduce these flaws using different glasses and groupings of elements. This correction varies by focus distance and will be optimal at just one distance, most people shoot not-macro therefore most lenses are corrected for far away and not up close. Lenses at their ...


0

A given lens's optical formula can shift groups of elements in the lens around only so much to achieve focus. If you wear corrective glasses or have a magnifying glass, you can simply see how this works: you need the corrective/magnifying glass some specific distance from your eye for it to be able to focus on your subject. Move the corrective or magnifying ...


3

Yes, a bellows set should be able to give you 1:1, unless it's too deep when collapsed. In that case, it's not that you can't get up to 1:1, but that you won't be able to get down to 1:1 with the lens nominally adjusted to infinity focus; your magnification will always be greater than 1:1. In both cases (the dedicated Adaptall extension tube and the bellows) ...



Top 50 recent answers are included