Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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2

When talking about macro lenses I think you'll find that they are most typically referring to using it at its highest magnification, typically 1:1. Simply, 1:1 magnification means your subject will be projected on to the sensor/film at the same size as it actually is. That means that on a full-frame sensor DSLR your subject is about 36 x 24 mm (about 1-1/2 x ...


2

You are right that it is possible to shade the flower but it's not that difficult to work around if that is what you have. You can always add artificial light or buy a lens with integrated LEDs such as the Canon EF-M 28mm F/3.5 Macro IS STM. If you are not using Canon, there are third-party options with light. The Canon is actually quite cheap, around $300 ...


0

The distance becomes a problem if you shoot something very small, close to 1:1. It is less of a problem for larger objects, because you don't have to come so close. You know what to look for and how large your objects are. Try before you buy and you will be fine.


1

I use a 180mm macro myself for insects, but a 90mm macro for anything else. 150mm is better than a 105mm as far as working distance goes, if the 105mm is better er not is questionable, since all macro (1:1) glasses I have ever uses where top notch. I'll would go for the 150mm but 180mm is even better for insects that is.


1

Another way to get an inexpensive extension tube with aperture contacts is to get an old 2x teleconverter and take out the glass. The 2x teleconverters are usually about 50mm, so using one and a 50mm lens will get you to 1:1, if you so desire.


1

Macro lenses are optimized for close-up photography and small f-stops (because depth of field is reduced the closer you get to a subject, so small f-stops (larger numbers) are usually required). They will focus closer than non-macro lenses. They work quite well for everyday photography, too. However, they are usually not "fast" lenses, quite often around f4. ...


0

Different focal lengths will give you more or less working room. The longer the focal length, the further you can be from your subject. Another alternative is to use old enlarger lenses, with an appropriate step up ring to get to M42 size. They actually work extremely well for macro photography, and they have no focusing helicoid, so they are made for a ...


1

I've used these setups on both DX and FX bodies I used to shoot a Sigma 180mm Macro for insect and flower photography. It is an amazing lens but it was pretty much dedicated to tight closeups or long telephoto so in the end it is really jut wastes space in my camera bag. Now I used my Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 with a 2x Teleconverter and a a set of extension ...


0

I think you may be at the limit of diminishing returns. Short of getting a custom-ground meniscus lens to compensate for the different optical paths, the solution looks complex (read a few light-losing surfaces). The way out of this box will be to use two cameras and synchronize the views electronically, after the shooting session. That will give you more ...


0

I think there are two options and they can be combined: Get plenty of light. This will allow shorter exposure to stop the motion and narrower aperture to increase the depth of field to keep the flower in focus. Macro flash, regular flash or passive reflectors can help here Prevent the motion by fixing the flower or by protecting the flower from the wind


0

Whatever your shutter/ISO/aperture settings (and your desire to blur the background helps here) anything you can do to steady the subject helps. An assistant holding the plant is almost always acceptable. They can also act as a windbreak (as can your kit bag close to the ground, a chair...). In some situations (e.g. your own garden) you may be able to ...


2

The only thing you need is a fast shutter-speed to freeze the motion. How fast depends on the breeze and magnification but 1/2000s or around that should be good. Magnification is how big the flower appears in the photo. If you are filling the frame with a flower, then movements will be far more perceptible than if your flower is in the corner at one tenth ...


3

A few ideas: More mirrors to make the path lengths match The first is to use more mirrors such that the path lengths are much more similar, while hopefully not increasing the total by very much. Here's a sketch based on yours. The up and down parts of the extra path in the top beam are each half the lenth of the extra path distance in the bottom beam. ...


0

For smaller objects and larger magnifications manual focus is recomended using live magnification, it is funny that many times it is better to use zoom ring or moving camera backward-forward than turn the focus ring. For flowers and leaves autofocus on chosen point would give good results. If you want better result and not want to use stacking, then tilt-and-...



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