Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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1

Most "true" macro lenses (i.e., those that can achieve 1:1 magnification; that is the image on the sensor is the same size as in real life) can double as extremely sharp portrait lenses, since most of them are f/2.8 longer primes. However, they'll cost quite a bit more than "a few hundreds" (most seem to be in the $400-$1000 range). There might be some ...


1

The pragmatic answer is: If possible, you make your aperture smaller to achieve the desired DOF. That way you do not trade in resolution. Stepping back and cropping in is equivalent to choosing a longer focal length and stepping back (apart from the resulting resolution). It probably is an unpractical way to influence the DOF. Mathematically, I think none ...


0

Unfortunately Sony does not give external software access to the focusing. That´s why none of the available software solutions like Helicon Remote supports Sony Cameras. One option to get stacks that you can combine using a software like Helicon or Zerene Stacker would be a hardware solution for the focus shift. Instead of using external software to move ...


1

If you don't want to carry two lenses, you might want to add an Extension Tube to use with your 18-135 STM: http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-S-18-135mm-f-3.5-5.6-IS-STM-Lens-Review.aspx


2

The Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens is the closest to what you desire. It isn't a true macro 1:1 lens, but it does provide .70x as well as a fairly close miniumum focusing distance of 7.9"(200mm). The image quality will far exceed the current zoom lens you have, and the macro quality is very high for a zoom or non dedicated macro. It's a great lens ...


3

Personally, I think you need to bite the bullet and just carry both lenses. Two lenses is not a huge amount of gear, and the 100L Macro is arguably the best macro lens you can get for the Canon mount. You could rent an EF-S 60mm f/2.8 USM Macro for the trip, which is smaller/lighter than the 100L, but it's not going to replace an 18-135 for walkaround use, ...


3

There is no direct relation between focal length and minimum focal distance. Usually a long focal length means a long minimum focal distance, but that is just because a lens built that way also has other characteristics that are preferable, like having a reasonable focus range. If you add extension tubes between the lens and the camera, the minimum focal ...


10

It depends entirely on how the lens was designed, there is no general formula or way of determining the minimum focus distance. Lenses of the same focal length can have completely different minimum focus distances depending on which factors the lens designer chose to optimise.


0

Have you considered Photoshop? I don't know how "super easy" you need it to be, but it's quite easy in Photoshop. Open Adobe Photoshop, go to File -> Automate -> Photomerge. After Photoshop automatically adds all of your photos on each of their own layers, you then select all layers, and go to Edit -> Auto Blend Layers -> Stack Images. A few ...


2

It is really rather simple. The diopter value will tell you how close you must be to the subject of your photograph, the farthest distance you can get a sharp image with the close-up lens on. you divide one metre by the diopter value to get the distance, which is the focal distance of the close-up lens. Hence a +1 lens will give a far distance of 1 m and ...



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