Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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1

Yes, you can use a Macro lens as long as you are able to attach the Nikon CFI Plan 10x microscope objective to the front filter threads and have it close to the front element. If the Nikon 105mm f/2.8 macro has a recessed front element, it may not be possible to get good results. There will be no vignetting with lenses that 100mm or more. Source: ...


-1

It's a microscope objective, so no, you can't use your Nikon 105mm f/2.8 macro lens as a tube lens. Only tube lenses are tube lenses. However, with extension tubes (not lens) and close up filters, you may be able to achieve the same magnification with you Nikon 105mm (10x is possible as in this case, while 100x times require an actual microscope objective). ...


1

You would be able to form an image on the sensor with it focused to infinity but you're likely to have some vignetting - it could be quite bad. It's worth trying, but don't spend a lot on the adaptors! In fact you may want to try a cardboard adaptor first to judge the field of view. The magnification onto the sensor won't be 10x using a 105mm tube lens. ...


0

As the others have alluded to here, the aperture number (aka. f-stop) indicated on the physical aperture ring only indicates the effective aperture when focused in the non-macro range - i.e. at distances greater than perhaps 1 meter or so. The reason why the camera reports a narrower aperture than the lens setting is because of the effective lengthening of ...


0

That sounds like normal behavior for macros (and even some telephotos I've noticed). My Tokina 100mm does the same thing. As you get closer to your subject and focus closer to the lens the aperture will change.


1

Like most macro lenses, the f/2.8 aperture is only for large distances. As you get closer, the actual aperture of the lens changes. It's just how macro lenses work. http://www.kenrockwell.com/tokina/100mm-f28.htm under Falloff shows that this specific lens only does f/5.6 at 1:1.


0

While not exhaustive, these are the terms for lens types I've run into: Prime vs. Zoom A prime lens is a lens with a fixed focal length. A zoom lens is a lens with a variable focal length. Simple as that. Wide, Normal, Telephoto These designations are about the focal length that the lens has: short, medium, and long, respectively. In full-frame ...


-1

First we need to define “normal” as to focal length. This is because wide-angle and telephoto are referenced from this value. All cameras can be fitted with a “normal” lens. Such a lash-up delivers an angle of view of about 45⁰. We are talking about a camera that yields a rectangular image. The 45⁰ angle of view results when the camera is held horizontal ...


2

Think of those as qualifiers, not types because they are not mutually exclusive: Relative to viewing-angle, lens can be called: Ultra-Wide, Wide-Angle, Normal, Telephoto, Super-Telephoto. These terms are not absolute either in that a lens can be wide-angle when mounted on one camera and normal or ultra-wide on another, depending if the sensor is relatively ...


0

Rail Pro: Easy to make fine adjustments without deranging your composition or moving the tripod once set up Good method for focus stacking, moving through the planes is always linear Rail Con: Can move your camera away from the tripod's center of force downwards, increasing risk of low speed oscillation or settling of a light tripod Lens Focus Pro: No ...



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