Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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31

There are a couple things you need to get great super-close macro shots of insects. The first, and supremely most important, is patience. You are going to fail to get the shot FAR more than you will succeed when trying to get 1:1 or better insect macros. Over time, two things will happen: As you hang around a location, insects will become adjusted to you, ...


30

The best way is to use the lowest ISO possible (100 is often the best), and slightly overexpose (without clipping highlights), then post process it back down. This will help to decrease noise in the shadows. Also shoot raw, so that any adjustments can be made before the conversion to jpeg.


26

True macro lens gives you a 1:1 magnification -- that is a ratio of size of the subject and its image on the sensor. With 1:1 magnification on APS-C sensor (22×15 mm), you can fill whole picture with area of this size. Other properties of macro lenses include that they have fixed focal lengths, usually very low distortion (see distortion figures of ...


25

There's so many nice Pentax primes — why pick just one when you can collect a whole set? That's why we have Lens Buying Addiction, after all! In seriousness, based on what you've said, I think the smc PENTAX DA 35mm F2.8 Macro Limited may be the place you should start. But, I've used quite a few Pentax primes, so let me give you the whole tour, as it were. ...


21

They're a tube that fits between the lens and camera body to help with macro photography. its sole purpose is to move the lens farther from the image plane. The farther away the lens is, the closer the focus, the greater the magnification There is also loss of light so your aperture and/or exposure time will be affected. You can buy ones specific to ...


21

Long macro lens Patience Ninja training Camp out a flower bed Most wild things in general (birds, animals, insects) will let you take better pictures if you just hang around the area long enough to become a normal part of their environment. Edit: Ninja skills or not, I don't recommend camping out some areas...like say...wolves dens...


21

The macro lens is capable of focusing on things that are really close. How close? (Magification ratios explained) A 1:1 magnification means that a lens can focus on something so close, its image on the film/sensor is the same size as the subject itself, so you can imagine that's probably about as close to the lens as the lens is long (depending on the lens ...


20

For macro of reflecting things you need a as big as possible lightsource. Best would be a macro tent, but you can improvise with a few pieces of paper and light sources. Just cut one piece of paper in half, form a ring from the two pieces, put them on some other papers and put light sources outside the paper: If the stuff is really reflective, put another ...


19

The Canon 100mm f/2.8 is a great lens for macro photography. It is indeed possible to use it on the 450D, as I do so myself. However it should be noted that due to that camera's 1.6x cropped sensor, you get an "effective focal length" of 160mm. This is due to the fact that the 450D has a narrower field of view than a full-frame camera like the 5D or 1D ...


19

You're close on what 1:1 means but slightly off. A 1:1 macro lens means that the size of the subject is projected onto the sensor (or film) at the exact same size it is in real life. You can blow up the print as large as you like :) The ability to go to 1:1 is just a metric and there are a lot of compromises that come with being able to enlarge a subject ...


19

The answer is here, from Nikon: Minimum Focus Distance The minimum focus distance is the shortest distance at which a lens can focus. In the case of digital SLR cameras, the distance to the subject is measured from the focal plane mark on the camera body, not from the front of the lens. Since the lens has a minimum focus distance of 18.5cm, and is ...


19

Here's a really good case for the application of Okham's Razor. The simplest explanation is that the image was shot outdoors, under the midday sun. The blur was not added in post but is the result of the close shooting distance and relatively wide aperture of f/4. The fast shutter speed was required otherwise the shot would have been overexposed due to the ...


16

Q: I'm interested in food photography. That's actually a broader statement than you may realize. Are you interested in professional food photography? Taking pictures of food that you've made? Taking pictures of food objects (say, a tomato or a carrot), or prepared food products (say, a gumbo, or a ham sandwich)? Q: What lens are best for food photography? ...


16

The DoF Preview button is on the front of your camera, just below the lens release button.


15

Focusing rail is a type of camera mount that allows you to move the camera forwards and backward on a very small scale. (image taken from article at Earthbound Light) The reason for using them is that in macro photography you have such small depth of field that it's easier to focus lens to given distance and then move the camera to get the parts you want ...


15

The 1:1 designation means that the image of a subject projected onto the sensor (or film) is the same size on the sensor as real life, and is the minimum magnification to classify as true macro. There are lenses that do magnify more, such as Canon's MP-E 65 which can magnify images between 1 and 5 times their real-world size. The benefit of 1:1 ...


15

Depth of field decreases rapidly as you focus closer, what you're experiencing is common to all macro lenses. It can only be remedied by stopping the aperture right down, or by using focus stacking. Autofocus is also commonly unreliable with macro photography the best approach is often to set the lens to its minimum focus distance and then move the camera ...


15

These are known as Chromatic Aberrations or Colour Fringing. These predominantly occur around areas with high contrast such as sharp edges in photographs or around the white water bottle and dark background in your case. A wider apeture can affect the lenses sensitivity to aberrations although certain lenses can see this "effect" vary depending on focal ...


14

To minimise noise get as much light down the lens as you can. As you have a static subject using a longer exposure is probably the best option. Setting the ISO to the minimum value will help you let in more light. Select the aperture based on sharpness, I'd go for something in the middle like f/5.6 For the ultimate noise reduction, consider taking multiple ...


14

Yes - if you took the same shot using the same lens on two cameras, one with 6 megapixels and one with 12, you would be able to crop the larger image, effectively zooming into the image. There are a few things to bear in mind: 12 megapixels is not twice the size of 6 megapixels - it's only 41% bigger along each side. The image quality at the pixel level ...


14

I think step number one is to find something more interesting than crumbs on your keyboard to shoot. And I don't mean that in a flippant way. Get away from the computer and stop taking test shots — start taking real photographs which you find interesting. Take those photographs back and do exactly what you've been doing: play around and make them look as ...


14

"What are the different types of macro lenses"? There are "Macro" lenses and there are Macro lenses. As others have mentioned, a true Macro lens will magnify the subject to a 1:1 ratio which is generally a desirable feature. Many lenses will be marketed as 'Macro' lenses even though they don't magnify down to 1:1 so be careful to check the actual ...


13

As far as I know there should be no real difference. The extension tube have no lens elements but is merely (as the name suggests) a tube. The Kenko extension tubes feature the same electrical connections as the Canon one (judging from reviews and images on the net). According to this review, there are two versions of the Kenko tubes; an older one that is ...


13

Yes there are a couple of options for doing macro on the cheap. The most common is extension tubes which are hollow tubes which basically just move the lens further away, decreasing the minimum focussing distance in the process. If you're really stuck you can in fact just hold your lens in front of the camera focus and composure are a bit hit and miss with ...


13

In this sort of situation, the normal approach is to use a focusing rail which allows fine and controlled adjustments to be made. There are several available on the market, with some under £50, but it would be possible to make one yourself, if you have the right tools.


13

This is called Minimum Focusing Distance. It is measured from the film/sensor plane. Usually it's printed on the lens ( next to a flower icon ).



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