Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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9

I disagree with some of the things MikeW said. No matter what is between the subject and the sensor (or film), there will be light loss relative to what you would otherwise expect by considering only the f-stop. This is basic physics. The additional light loss relative to f-stop is 1/(1 + M)^2, where M is the magnification from the real subject to its ...


7

You can use this calculator to play around... http://www.eosdoc.com/manuals/?q=jlcalc I got close enough on a 1.3x crop just adding all three kenko extension tubes behind my Canon 100L macro. According to the calculator, that gave me a magnification of 1.45 (and then multiply by 1.25 to give 1.8). That's at .25m. Keep in mind the lens plus body ...


5

Depth of Field Reversing a lens will produce a very shallow DOF. You may also get distortion and vignetting and have difficulty focusing, as you can only focus at a very narrow range of distances. From memory extension tubes have less DOF than a macro lens, but I am not certain of that. Light Loss You will lose 1-2 stops of light using extension ...


5

You attach both lenses by their filter threads. So you need to find a reverse rings where one filter thread is for tele and another is for prime lens filter thread (so in your case 62 -> 52mm). Just be careful not to buy one with bayonet on one side and filter thread on another, as that's quite different type on mounting than what you need. And be careful ...


4

Extension tube (ET) versus reverse adaptor (RA): A RA is cheaper, but you will probably have a "fixed focus" and therefore, fixed reproduction ratio -- at least on your 50mm. On some zoom lenses, the zoom ring can change the focus distance when reversed, but image quality may be poor. Reversed lenses often exhibit a notable lack of flatness of field. This ...


4

The answer to your first question is answered here. Both are good low-cost ways to get started in macro photography. Autofocus is not very effective as you near 1:1 magnification. Most AF systems will struggle to find focus, you have such a narrow DOF anyway that holding focus is very hard. With anything that is not moving, you are far better to set up a ...


3

I see two major flaws with your "test". As noted in your blog post that you linked to, this view is at 1:1 or 100% magnification. Any image is going to look near terrible at that magnification. Be reasonable in your analysis, and zoom out to fill your screen or similar. You are taking an image of a rubber nub. A rubber nub that is meant to be pushed and ...


2

By reading the other reviews on Amazon, it sounds like you aren't the only one that has issues with this device focusing. Some people use it as a paperweight for example. One user did mention that they use a standard kit 18-55mm zoom lens and at 35mm only about 25% of the image is in focus. That sounds very similar to what you described as "can not get ...


2

I also don't have an special macro lens, so I use macro filters as well. My experience, as well as the opinion of thousands of others is, that generally in macro photography, manual focus is the state of the art anyway. Because of the close distance of the camera to the subject, the depth of field gets really tiny, so the use of a tripod is mandatory. Often ...


2

Closeup filters have a tendency to make the phase detect sensor go "insane", as they are operating effectively with distances well beyond the lens working range. Usually closeup filters are used in manual focus, and - really - it's usually better to focus by moving your position slightly rather than by acting on the focus ring (specially if it is a strong ...


2

Two solutions to your dust question, Tape, it does a pretty good job with repeat application to remove dust and debris. Apply remove, repeat. Post processing Don't forget the advertising guys will have a pile of brand new gear to shoot and not a (not so) lovingly used handset.


2

You can use any lens from any manufacturer. I use a 40 year old PK-mount Rikonon 50mm 1.7 lens on my Nikon (manual aperture rings are a great help when reversing). The wider the angle the bigger the magnification. Lens filter threads do vary in size, so make sure the ring you buy fits the lens you plan to use. Check out the Photo SE blog post on reversing ...


1

You'll need a lens with a minimum focus distance small enough to accommodate your rig. (See also How close can a lens focus?) There are several ways to accomplish this. Your secondary macro lens, which mounts on the front of the existing lens, is one way to accomplish this, but won't necessarily be sufficient and certainly won't give the best image quality. ...


1

The Nikon V1 does know what to do. While this camera is equipped with both Phase-Detect and Contrast-Detect AF, both these work with a feedback loop. The camera measures, takes action and repeats until it detects that it has achieved focus. You have added an unknown element in the optical path and the autofocus cannot determine what to do in all likelihood. ...


1

You have a powerful combination with the 180 macro and the 550d. I am impressed you need more! Note that if you go to a full frame body such as the 1DX or 5D Mk3 you will have less magnification. With the crop sensor you actually get about 1.6:1 magnification, and this will drop to 1:1 with a full frame sensor. Your options to increase power include the ...


1

With a macro converter like the DCR 250 you are going to be trying to balance between getting a workable depth of field (creatively interesting, but challenging) with longer lenses, and getting rid of vignetting when shooting wide. I've found similar setups require a lot of care in setting up, but your stock lens should, especially when racked out, be able ...


1

The Ricoh GR-II is not an interchangable-lens camera. So the only alternative/additional lenses you can use with it are the conversion lenses GW-1 (wide, 21mm) / GT-1 (tele, 40mm) and the GH-1 hood adapter. I'm not sure which other lens adapters will fit the GH-1. Perhaps your camera manual specifies the thread size for the GH-1, which will allow you ...



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