Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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0

during your day light shooting for the Race,both the Lenses would be fine,and you won't need any External Flash as well,At night try Focal lengths accordingly,see that the shutter speed ,F/Numbers and Iso Matches the best to desired Focal Length,Lets say for Eg,you are shooting at your mid Range Focal Length of 18-55mm.that would be 24mm or around ...


0

You should not use flash (on-camera or external). Unless you're at high ISO, it's not likely to be effective anyway, and it's likely to be a nuisance to the drivers if you're close to the track, and to your fellow spectators regardless of where you are.


0

With night shooting, you typically need more light for a good exposure, so you'd actually want different lenses--ones with a larger maximum aperture so you could open up the aperture setting (use a smaller f-number) to gather more light, a higher ISO setting, or a slower shutter speed. When you're at 1/80s, though, you can't really go much farther down or ...


0

Probably Fujis X-M1 and other X-Trans sensor Fuji cameras. They have impressive low-light performance (not the autofocus, but the image result), even better then DSLR and even Full frame sometimes - check out image comparison on dpreview for high-iso. Colors are nice as well. But they force you to use JPEG at high iso, and I think you might have to do manual ...


1

2 seconds, f4.0 and ISO 6400... You must be in a really dark environment, there. I'm not sure if there's anything that'll be bright enough for that type of lighting environment when in live view, anyway. However, the Olympus have something called a Live Time feature. It only works in bulb mode but might be something you're after. Both the OM-D E-M5 & ...


0

Bulb Mode means now it is upto you to hold shutter release button how long you want. Ideally in long exposure more, do this Mount your camera on a tripod attach a shutter release cable keep ISO max upto 400 f stop 11 is good with Nikon D90 and kit lens 18-105 Keep it on Bulb Mode Use stopwatch to time (1 minute, 90sec, 120sec) Now Just shoot and analyse ...


0

One factor not mentioned is that your light meter may be wildly misleading in this scenario. Light meters basically assume that your subject is averagely bright... the classical example is the 18% grey of a grey card; in most cases this will be reasonably correct but for a night-time cityscape consisting of a number of very bright light sources on a quite ...


1

The answers so far don't seem to talk about bulb mode, which I think should be mentioned: If you want f22 as the aperture, and you want a reasonable ISO so the image isn't too noisy, then the solution to me is to go over the 30 second exposure available with the built in settings, and going into Bulb mode. You can experiment with it without one, but I ...


2

Cities aren't that dark even at night, you equipment should be able to take the picture just fine. Your first problem is that f/22 is a tiny tiny aperture, it lets very little light into the camera - so, to compensate the camera needs a very long exposure and the built in timer only goes up to 30 seconds. I also think you might be mistaking about the ...


8

I guess that the kit lens is a 18-55 mm f/3,5-5,6 and together with a D90 there is no reason to buy a full-frame camera. It wont solve any of your problems and you'll be able to take this photo with the gear you have without any problems at all. Firstly, you would want to stay away from shooting at f/22. It will not give you sharp images nor the light that ...


0

Every single DSLR will have an Auto mode that's good enough for your needs. Yes, Sony A58 got slightly more elaborate auto mode than the competitors (in a matter a fact it actually has two auto modes: green and orange) but for a vast majority of photographs - it won't make a difference you'd ever notice. A58 got one advantage from a perspective of someone ...


6

I didn't have enough "reputation" to address some of these answers as comments. AJ Henderson is wrong, 30 1s exposures will (for the most part) be identical to 1 30s exposure. If it shows up in a 30s exposure, then stacking 30 1s exposures will also show it. I am actually the author of the article that Trengot linked (thanks!). In fact, unless you are ...


4

Fundamentally you're capturing the same amount of light in either case so the results should be the same. Practically, there are 2 differences between stacking 30 one second exposures and shooting one 30 second exposure. The first is the light lost between each one second exposure after the shutter closes before it reopens for the next exposure. This can ...


1

No, 30 one second exposures is not equivalent to a single 30 second exposure. You do gain a lot of information from doing 30 1 second exposures, but you are not able to detect anything that is too faint (which might have shown up on a 30 second exposure, but still registers as 0 on the 1 second exposures). It is a good technique to avoid noise, but does ...


-4

i don't think it is possible. amount of light on every photo is the same, it means no additional information in details you can add, so it's like you have only one photo


0

Yes it is possible. Put all images as layers and choose Add to on every layer in Photoshop. For night sky images, there is a software called deepskystacker. DeepSkyStacker is a freeware for astrophotographers that simplifies all the pre-processing steps of deep sky pictures. http://deepskystacker.free.fr/english/index.html This image is stacked from 4 ...


2

This explains how to merge multiple short exposures to mimic the effect of a longer exposure. It's aimed at emulating ND filter photos but the principal should be the same. The basic premise is to take multiple shorter shots and then use a tool like Hugin to align and ImageMagick to convert them into in a single image. The result is effectively the same as ...



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