Serene Life

by garik

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0

The best way to focus at infinity is by using a so-called Bahtinov mask or a Hartmann Mask. A problem you will have to deal with is tripod motion during the long exposure. Also, if you photograph the sky, the rotation of the Earth will cause the stars to become small trails. It is almost impossible to take perfectly sharp pictures without using remote ...


2

You've pretty much figured out your three options. (Something else). f/2.8 zooms are the preferred choice for many event-shooting professionals for the reasons you state. So, this is probably the most effective route, but also the most expensive. Flash (and many pros will do this in combination with f/2.8 zooms) can also help immeasurably with this type ...


0

We ran into the same type of issues with our indoor shoots. We ended up getting a "faster" variable lens, f2.8 17-55, and that has helped. Also getting a lens with IS (image stabilization) can help reduce vibrations and allow for slower shutter speeds, as long as your subject isn't moving too much. A decent flash is also an extremely valuable tool. ...


0

I had a similar problem a few years back and I purchased the Tamron SP AF17-50mm F/2.8 XR VC Di II LD Aspherical (IF) (Canon Mount) for £346 in UK. The extra stops really helped me at ISO 1000 and less. I also developed a new style of holding the camera indoors. I would bring my left arm across my face and rest the hand on my Right Shoulder creating a rigid ...


3

This is a complex answer, so feel free to ask more questions. Basically, one major difference between the images is that your noise sources in the image is vastly different. Because the noise is different and because its contribution is different with regard to exposure, the obtained images are quite different. Think of your camera detector as a well that ...


0

A long exposure increases the possibility of blur due to camera movement (even tiny vibrations). You're also more likely to get noise in the image from the sensor if the exposure is very long (seconds rather than some fraction of a second).


0

If your using any cheap model P&S camera trying to do this that is non DSLR and a basic zoom lens please try using ISO 200 and max zoom with tripod. My camera is a Fujifilm Finepix T500 and sucks kinda for "IS" so a tripod is mandatory for this and many other shots. The camera doesn't have manual mode for adjustments on f-stops or a ring, just white ...


2

There are basically two ways to approach this. In both cases what you are doing is increasing the amount of total light that enters the camera so that the random nature of photon shot noise is minimized by the increased amount of total data (photons striking pixel wells). Long exposure images shot at lower ISO when combined with dark frame subtraction. ...


2

I'd say highly detailed because a) noise in low detail areas stands out, and b) where there's detail, noise can actually make an image appear sharper. This only applies if the size of the detail is larger enough compared to the size of the noise pattern.


0

If you're shooting in low light, the noise is mostly caused by the randomness of the number of photons hitting each sensor sight. So in one sense what you're shooting doesn't matter. But... you can reduce the noise a good deal if you take multiple exposures of the same scene and then stack and average them in post-processing. So my answer is a static subject ...


1

Nikon D3200 I have had the same problem except i was trying to photograph lightning and wanted to leave the shutter open for longer than 30 secs, using the remote control. When i set the Release Mode to Remote, the Bulb changes to Time, but when i clicked the Remote it simply took a quick photo, like 1/30 or something. I then tried this: switch dial to M ...


1

The manual (M) mode only means the light metering is manual. Focusing is still automatic unless you toggle the MF/AF switch on the lens. In your case, there's simply too little light available for the AF system to find focus, and by default the camera will refuse to take a picture in this situation. How to Force my Nikon D5000 to take a photo in low light? ...



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