Incense

by Bart Arondson

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5

If the exposure is correct, then it is not an exposure problem. The problem is that you are working in difficult conditions, with low light and people moving. There is really no good solution. You either push the ISO until you have an acceptable aperture (for depth of field) and shutter speed (for avoiding motion blur), or you use the flash. For these kind ...


0

There are many ways your camera might try to create a smaller image file, among them higher JPG compression. What exactly is going on inside of your camera is the manufacturer's secret. My assumption would be that the camera takes a raw image as usual and then just downscales it using a cheap (in terms of processing cost) rescaling algorithm. This is ...


1

Your conclusion is partially correct. You will get some noise reduction as part of the downscaling process. But it will come from the same image and camera settings (shutter, aperture, ISO) won't be different for the S and L modes. It's also likely that the S mode is using a lower quality setting on the JPEG encoder, which will negate some of the gains ...


2

I do not know your specific camera model, but I think in general that the S-to-L scale refers to the size of the compressed jpg image when stored on your camera memory card. In other words, your camera takes a raw picture at most of its possibilities and then compresses it in jpg format to save space on disk. Jpg is a lossy format, it means you can compress ...


2

The contrast in this photo is very high - the light in the background is obviously very bright, but the face is pretty much in shadow. To get the face lighter by only changing settings in the camera can be done 3 ways: Bigger aperture (smaller 'f' number): you were already at the biggest your lens can do at f/1.8 and from what I've seen, that's generally ...


0

Lets assume in the next scenario you are shooting wide open at the slowest feasible shutter speed. Take home message don't be afraid to use a high ISO in this situation. Prepare a couple more things before composing the photo. Set up a spot meter rather than average meter. This will mean that any intense lights or extreme darks don't skew the EV reading. ...


1

It's not so much sensitivity as coverage. The AF Assist beam is not particularly wide (even when your fingers and the lens itself aren't in the way), and on the D80 there are a lot of lenses (anything wider than about 30mm) that will put the not-centre AF points outside of the beam's coverage area. (Of course, if you're using a large-enough lens, the AF ...


2

Set the shallowest acceptable DOF (this will depend on your distance from subject as @Philip mentions) Set the slowest acceptable shutter speed. Resting the camera, leaning against a wall, or using a monopod or tripod can help lower this speed. The movement of the subject also has an impact of course, but for a portrait type of shot in your example it can ...


0

Raising the ISO, opening the diaphragm, and increasing the shutter speed are the only ways to go, as said above. But be careful with the aperture and the shutter speed: your bright objects will be burnt. Typically, for the picture above, I would have shot it that way, and then post-processing it. On the pictures you take, you should have a look quickly at ...


1

You might want to try and use the spot meter setting instead of the average. In the picture you posted there is a bright object on the right side that is throwing off the rest of the picture.


1

A few things I would consider are: How close to the original exposure is the photo and what determined the 3 main factors: shutter speed, aperture and iso? If you shoot in manual mode you will have chosen these settings yourself (if you set these yourself I would suggest increasing the iso to at least 3200 and your shutter speed to about 1/30th (tell the ...


2

Ignoring the white balance issue which is easily fixed in post, there's a couple of technical things you could look at to improve sharpness: Shutter speed. The general rule of thumb is that you want your shutter speed to be 1/effective focal length. In your case, that would be 35mm * 1.5 ~ 50 and therefore you'd want a shutter speed of 1/50s - but you've ...


0

With RAW, you don't worry about the white balance when shooting. The ISO is misunderstood and overused with RAW: if the image is too dark, turning up the ISO is no different than fixing it in Lightroom (but explainaions I've read don't consider quantization of the A-to-D step). However, the extended range or whatever that brand calls it can help if the ...


2

Improving the lighting would be the first thing to do. On your shot, the face of the person is practically unlit, as well as the background, resulting in too much contrast with blown whites on the right. The fact that the brightest light is facing the camera creates lens ghosts, which is probably not what you want. If you're unable to change lighting, then ...


0

In general, here are a few things that help in your situation. I'm not sure which features are available for the Samsung S1050, but if you search your User Manual for the italicized terms below, you should be able to determine which features your camera offers. Use a tripod to eliminate camera shake and allow slower shutter speeds. Focus manually if the ...


1

There is nothing wrong with that picture. :-) Gives back the feeling and the artistic intention. Anyway, potential improvements can be achieved by using a camera with high dynamic range sensor and using a strong dynamics compression curve (any new cameras know this, just do some test shots...) and/or zoom on the face, use center-weighted exposure ...



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