Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

There are two other advantages that full frame will give you besides better low light performance. A full frame image is 50 to 60% wider depending on the crop factor on your camera platform. On Nikon, it is 50% wider. This is crucial for landscape photography and makes it a far more compelling case for me. The other important factor is that full frame ...


1

You will need more light and use a fairly fast shutter speed, a tiny bit of blur might be desirable (to show them running, flailing around), opening the Aperture will reduce the DOF. I imagine the lowest cost is desirable, open your curtains on a sunny day. A multi-use alternative is to buy a portable Halogen flood light from the hardware store ($10): ...


0

All of the above answers would be a great choice. If you're able to spend 300-400 on a better lens it will be the best choice for sure. A speedlight will be one of the cheapest solutions. If you have white ceilings just point the speed light toward your roof. Also, taking out noise from high iso is easier to take out than exposure issues in post processing. ...


8

The answer @eftpotrm gave is pretty comprehensive, but let me highlight the single piece of advice that is by far the most likely to give you the desired results: Get a lens with a large maximum aperture, like f/1.8 !! The smaller the number, the better, but f/1.8 is the best that's typically available at a reasonable price. It's going to be a prime lens ...


3

You can't have your cake and eat it. Use Aperture priority mode at maximum aperture (smallest f stop) -that lets in as much available light as possible. The shutter speed you get will then be a function of ISO (sensitivity). Without additional light you just have to juggle these 2 as best you can - but you can't get both. I.e you need to choose between: ...


12

Your exposure is a function of - The amount of light reaching the subject (with the quality and direction of the light allowing you to control the effect) The shutter speed (too long leads to blurring as you've seen) The aperture (wide lets in lots of light with shallow depth of field, narrow the reverse) The ISO (like an amplifier dial on a hifi - ...


0

Increasing the ISO is the obvious choice, since you can't lower the shutter speed or use speedlight. So grainier pictures are inevitable, but at ISO 800 - 1600, it may not be so bad in real viewing distance.


1

Personal opinion only: I find that a sharp but noisy picture is usually preferable to a less noisy out of focus picture. Exceptions may be in situations where artistic aspects make the achieved degree of blur acceptable. Your findings may differ. (1) Lowest speed - SSL : Shoot at as low a speed as you can and still tolerate the target's & your motion ...


1

Your best approach when exposure time is fixed (and practically limited) is record RAW images and use as high ISO as possible without loosing necessary highlights. This graph shows how to select the best ISO setting for lowest SNR. You drop diagonal onto the graph and pick the ISO which is closest to it. In this graph the ISO settings closest to ideal are ...


2

We all see things differently. People who complain online are likely to outweigh the people who write to tell you how happy they are. In that case, just be aware that complaints are far more frequent and can distort the real picture significantly. 'Walk around' is a term that suggests you want a lens that you would prefer to keep attached to your camera ...


4

None of these lenses are going to approach L series lenses in terms of build quality and the ability to take punishment and just keep working as they should. There are reasons they offer near the same optical quality at 1/5 to 1/15 the price of an "L" prime lens. I've had an EF 50mm f/1.8 II "nifty fifty" since 1997 or so and it still works fine for what it ...


2

If you are considering a Canon 50mm lens, you should really consider the new EF 50mm 1.8 STM as it is much much better than the old plastic mount EF 50mm 1.8 II. The new STM version has much more accurate STM AF along with a metal mount, closer min focus distance, 7 blade aperture, better focus ring, and new coatings which improve the optics. It is so ...


2

You seem to have some confusion about the different lens designations. The "nifty 50" is the EF 50mm f/1.8. I don't think Canon offers a 50mm f/2.8. generally build quality is very important to me so the 50mm f2.8 "nifty 50" is out. Then step up to the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM. At $350, it costs more than the f/1.8 that I think you're referring to above but ...


2

Well the 40mm is a better focal length for walk around in my opinion, however if you are into portrait then the 50mm is certainly more flattering and it's a tad bit sharper and faster.


0

It's because you are in Manual mode. Change it to Av or Tv or simple push it to P mode. Good luck


1

If you want something that does low light and fast autofocus, chances are good you'll need to double or triple your budget and get a substantially different type of camera. The bridge cameras you're looking at are built to be low-cost versatile superzooms, where most of the money has gone to getting you super long reach. But it gets there with a combination ...


3

If you are serious about fast autofocus and low-light performance, you will have to consider cameras which can satisfy those needs. You cannot decide between models when neither distinguishes itself for your needs. Low light performance requires a larger sensor. Incidentally, more sensitive cameras often autofocus faster too. The other major factor is the ...



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